What is an "inside" rein or leg? - Page 2
 
 

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What is an "inside" rein or leg?

This is a discussion on What is an "inside" rein or leg? within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        08-01-2013, 04:46 PM
      #11
    Trained
    I LOVE this short book

    Http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Training-Horse-Rider-Podhajsky/dp/0879802359/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1375219035&sr=1-1&keywords=the+complete+training+of+horse+and+riderShould explain these terms to you. =D
         
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        08-01-2013, 04:52 PM
      #12
    Showing
    Red face

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tinyliny    
    keep in mind that you can be moving toward the left, such as sidepassing, or leg yielding, but your inside leg is your right leg because that is on the inside of the arc created by the horse's bend in his body.
    Going along the trail, you can bend the horse right or left, and thus create an inside leg that is left, then right, then left, all depending on what direction the horse is bent in .
    Exactly what I was getting at when I mentioned lateral work :) Thank you for clarifying that
         
        08-01-2013, 04:57 PM
      #13
    Super Moderator
    This highlights one of those 'Well I'm only a trail rider so it doesn't matter' things
    Cherie trained trail horse for a living so she speaks with a lot of experience and the better the training the better the ride you get. Things that seem like 'dressage maneuver's' will help when opening gates, avoiding bumping into things and a horse that turns and moves to legs aids is a lot handier than one you have to haul around by its head
    The position of the leg also makes a difference in whether you're turning the horse around that inside leg and/or asking it to not swing its butt too far over with the other leg behind the girth or asking it to step over sideways when you need your other leg 'open' to allow the horse to step into it
         
        08-01-2013, 05:02 PM
      #14
    Trained
    In most cases, the inside leg is the one you want your horse to either move away from or bend around. Let's say you're on a narrow trail and you have one of those horses with a sense of humor who likes to smack your knees into trees. In that situation, you would need to your inside leg, (the one your horse is about to slam into the tree) to move your horse away from the tree. Any horse should know how to move off a leg.
         
        08-01-2013, 05:04 PM
      #15
    Showing
    Most riding maneuvers are useful to any discipline, trail riding included.
    Cherie likes this.
         
        08-01-2013, 08:43 PM
      #16
    Weanling
    I absolutely agree about different riding maneuvers being useful in all sorts of situations, that's why I'm asking. :) I have a good horse and I want to become a good rider for him.

    Quote:
    In most cases, the inside leg is the one you want your horse to either move away from or bend around. Let's say you're on a narrow trail and you have one of those horses with a sense of humor who likes to smack your knees into trees. In that situation, you would need to your inside leg, (the one your horse is about to slam into the tree) to move your horse away from the tree. Any horse should know how to move off a leg.
    This is exactly my horse. He is very mischievous around trees!

    I am understanding the responses to this thread a lot better now and I have been wanting to get somewhere with lateral movement. I don't think I quite realized that the two things were related. Thanks for the info everyone!
         
        08-01-2013, 09:52 PM
      #17
    Banned
    Didn't have time to read all the responses.

    If you are riding in the arena, the inside leg and hand are the ones inside the arena, outside would be at the fence, the outside edge.

    To teach a horse to leg yield is actually super easy. Open your left rein wide, give a few gentle pulls while kicking, kick, kick kick until they move over.

    Put up a line of cones and weave in and out of them at walk to do this. After your horse responds every time to this, then just open the rein while giving a few kicks. When he's got this. Remove the open hand and just use leg aids.

    Then switch to a squeeze over a kick.

    Then when you have it all the time in walk, as in trot. If not getting it in trot, add back in the open hand or the hand squeeze, as needed and work through it again. Then same again in canter.

    I think it's one of the easiest things to teach a horse, most get it quickly, like in 5 mins at the walk.
         
        08-01-2013, 10:11 PM
      #18
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tinaev    
    I am understanding the responses to this thread a lot better now and I have been wanting to get somewhere with lateral movement. I don't think I quite realized that the two things were related. Thanks for the info everyone!
    You can teach basic yielding on the ground when they're tied up or in crossties or in the stall. Any sideways movement is considered a yield of pressure.

    Someone already mentioned teaching it under saddle. Get it right at the halt and walk (helps to face a wall) before you do the trot.
         

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