What questions I need to ask upon purchasing a horse AND ???
   

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What questions I need to ask upon purchasing a horse AND ???

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    • 1 Post By WickedNag

     
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        04-11-2011, 08:54 PM
      #1
    Weanling
    What questions I need to ask upon purchasing a horse AND ???

    Couple of questions for you guys. I am getting my area ready and hopefully will be able to start building the stable and pasture stuff within a month at the latest. I went and looked at a 15 yr old Paint mare yesterday and she was beautiful. I didnt go up to her though, only from the house I looked and just met the guy for the first time as I heard he had some Paints.

    My dad has messed with horses in his younger days but it has been awhile since he has been around them like he used to so for my knowledge I want to know what things I should ask and look for. If you guys want to compile a little list that'd be fine lol. I know the basic stuff like how old , take a look at their teeth, look at the hoofs, overall body, has the horse been riden, any bad tendicies. I guess those are the general stuff and yeah also is the horse registered or not . I'm sure I might be leaving out alot of stuff though lol.

    2nd question is can Oats and Rye grass be planted together? The guy said his field was Oats and Rye grass but I didnt specifically ask him if it was a mixture as in mixed seed or rather part of the field was Rye and part Oats or what. It did look the same throughout though.
         
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        04-11-2011, 09:15 PM
      #2
    Weanling
    Will Oats or Rye even grow in the shade areas too? I put Expert weed and feed saturday over the area that I cut with the mower last wk. I was wondering if I could put Rye or oats or both on top of that? I do want to give this possibly a month though to see how it will grow with what I put down saturday morning.
         
        04-12-2011, 07:33 AM
      #3
    Started
    I always ask what makes the horse worth what they are asking. Surprised as some of the answers I have received over the years.... Color being a big one anymore YIKES!

    So I am a beautiful buckskin in color but my confirmation stinks and I buck occasionally...but since I have the perfect buckskin color, you won't be ashamed of your horse as you are hitting the ground... LOL
    MouseZ likes this.
         
        04-12-2011, 07:53 AM
      #4
    Showing
    A first horse is a fantastic experience. Looking at their teeth, hooves, etc are good places to start but only if you know what you are looking at and for. If the horse is registered, you will know it's age without trying to figure it out from their teeth - but, checking their teeth for signs of cribbing is a very important thing.

    The very best advise I would give a first time owner, is to take someone very knowledgeable with you; a trainer, not just someone who has been around horses for a time. A trainer will best be able to judge the horse's movement and attitude. Secondly, have a vet check your prospect over and talk to the horse's farrier.

    Lastly, buy with your head and not your heart. I've seen so many buyers end up with a nut case because the horse came over to them and put his head down for you to scratch or follow you around like a puppy - but then the horse became a terror when he got to your home. Go to the appointment at least 1/2 hour ahead of time which will prevent the seller from injecting the horse ... one last thing, insist that the horse be brought in from the pasture (or out of the stall) when you get there - you want to see how the horse behaves when being caught and saddled.

    Good luck!!
         
        04-12-2011, 08:38 AM
      #5
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by iridehorses    
    Secondly, have a vet check your prospect over and talk to the horse's farrier.
    ...and take good note of the horse's diet (simple grass/hay or some special diet). Medical problem, hoof problems, and diet are the three biggest areas that will make a huge difference in your ongoing costs. I've always made 'low maintenance' a very high priority when looking at a horse.
         
        04-12-2011, 08:51 AM
      #6
    Banned
    On what to plant in your area for pasture; contact your local cooperative extension. They are very helpful and know the ins and outs of your area and what will work best there. You should probably get your soil tested before you plant, so you know if you need to add anything.

    I agree with iride on this one. Take some one very knowledgeable with you. Not just someone who had horses once many years ago.

    A PPE (pre-purchase exam) is never a bad thing. No horse is so cheap that a PPE is not needed.
    If nothing else a good PPE exam gives you a baseline to work from if something goes wrong in the future.
         

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