When learning to Trot should it be something to be nervous about?
   

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When learning to Trot should it be something to be nervous about?

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    12-19-2012, 01:55 AM
  #1
Foal
When learning to Trot should it be something to be nervous about?

Hi im Shenee and was just wondering if I should get soo nervy when the horse gets into a trot?? And how long it should take for me too get used too the bouncing with it and going with the flow of the trot and just get used too it... Is cantering easier or scarier orrr?? Thanks heaps.
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    12-19-2012, 02:00 AM
  #2
Super Moderator
Just try to relax, don't force yourself into doing anything you're not ready for, and listen closely to what your trainer/instructor tells you to do. Both trot and canter can seem a bit scary for a beginner during the first tries, but you will learn to love it. ;) Personally I prefer cantering to any other gait, it is so energizing and more comfortable than trot when you're in sync with the horse, but that's a matter of how the horse moves and of riders' preference.

Also, it might be a good idea to share these feelings with your trainer/instructor, so that you can work on your confidence and balance - there are numerous good exercises for that. ;)
     
    12-19-2012, 03:58 AM
  #3
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saranda    
Just try to relax, don't force yourself into doing anything you're not ready for, and listen closely to what your trainer/instructor tells you to do. Both trot and canter can seem a bit scary for a beginner during the first tries, but you will learn to love it. ;) Personally I prefer cantering to any other gait, it is so energizing and more comfortable than trot when you're in sync with the horse, but that's a matter of how the horse moves and of riders' preference.

Also, it might be a good idea to share these feelings with your trainer/instructor, so that you can work on your confidence and balance - there are numerous good exercises for that. ;)
thanks Saranda do you have to do the bouncing with the horse type thing with cantering or is it different ? Can't wait till I can start cantering I find trotting fun even tho I can only do it in small amounts its fun but nervy at the same time.. Lol where bouts are you from ?
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    12-19-2012, 04:14 AM
  #4
Super Moderator
Usually you will sit out the canter - no bouncing at all (that's called the rising trot, if you rise and lower your pelvis in sync with the horses' rhthm, but if you "bounce" like "are being thrown all over the horses back", you should consult your trainer for sitting out the trot better and balancing yourself ) :) However, you can also ride the canter in the two-point, but you will have to think about it only later, and I've seen something like rising canter in some riders - I'm not familiar with it, but, if I remember correctly, it is meant to save the strenght for the horse and rider for more challenging races or courses, mostly in English riding - I know nothing of Western. And, as you ask - I'm from Latvia.
     
    12-19-2012, 04:42 AM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saranda    
Usually you will sit out the canter - no bouncing at all (that's called the rising trot, if you rise and lower your pelvis in sync with the horses' rhthm, but if you "bounce" like "are being thrown all over the horses back", you should consult your trainer for sitting out the trot better and balancing yourself ) :) However, you can also ride the canter in the two-point, but you will have to think about it only later, and I've seen something like rising canter in some riders - I'm not familiar with it, but, if I remember correctly, it is meant to save the strenght for the horse and rider for more challenging races or courses, mostly in English riding - I know nothing of Western. And, as you ask - I'm from Latvia.
yeh it is more of a rythm thing and syncin with the horse.. Oh yehh cool sooo you stay more in the saddle with cantering?? Oh yeh cool wheres that? Im in australia
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    12-19-2012, 04:56 AM
  #6
Super Moderator
Yes, exactly. This is a good example and explanation of how cantering works - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fbbm_U9MdPc

Latvia is a small country in Eastern Europe. However, if you'd like to engage in private conversations about general topics with the forum members, I'd suggest using the private messaging option or joining/creating discussions in the General Offtopic board or others that seem suitable for your questions of interest, outside the topic of horses. :)
     
    12-19-2012, 05:23 AM
  #7
Yearling
Is it possible for you to take a few English riding lessons? If you learn to post the trot it is not so bouncy and you will be more balanced. It isn't fun for the horse to have a person bouncing about on it's back either so... learning to post the trot will help immensely. Also, if you are doing a slow jog trot like in western it is very smooth.

You really shouldn't try a Canter until you can trot easily. In fact, my students never cantered until they were posting without the irons.
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    12-19-2012, 07:21 AM
  #8
Green Broke
If Shenee is in Australia chances are she is going to be taking English lessons already.

As the others have said, it can be a bit tricky getting used to the trot. Ideally you won't be "bouncing" around but either sitting the trot (where you stay in the saddle) or rising (also known as posting) which is where you stand up a little one stride, and sit down the other. If you're not used to the rhythm it would probably seem a bit bouncy!

A lot of it is just time. You have to ride and practice and then you get it and it becomes pretty natural. A lot of riding is done at the trot so you should get used to it :) Cantering is hard in its own way, and bouncy in its own way.

Where in Australia are you?
     
    12-19-2012, 07:54 AM
  #9
Green Broke
"Should" you get nervous? In my opinion no. You might though.

Some people find the canter to be scary, mostly because of the speed. Personally I like the canter more than the trot but the trot is very very useful for training both me and my horse.

Relax. If you get scared don't panic. Some people make their situation bad or worse because they panic and stop using the reins because they've got a death grip on the saddle, which ends up letting the horse think he's free, which often makes them act stupider. If you feel like you need to grab the saddle that's ok - just make sure its only with one hand and use the reins with the other.
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    12-19-2012, 09:25 AM
  #10
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inga    
Is it possible for you to take a few English riding lessons? If you learn to post the trot it is not so bouncy and you will be more balanced. It isn't fun for the horse to have a person bouncing about on it's back either so... learning to post the trot will help immensely. Also, if you are doing a slow jog trot like in western it is very smooth.

You really shouldn't try a Canter until you can trot easily. In fact, my students never cantered until they were posting without the irons.
yes and I don't literally bounce on the horses back it just feels bouncy cause im not used to it... What is a post trot...? And Qld whys that?
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