When learning to Trot should it be something to be nervous about? - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Talk

When learning to Trot should it be something to be nervous about?

This is a discussion on When learning to Trot should it be something to be nervous about? within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

    Like Tree1Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        12-19-2012, 10:28 AM
      #11
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Saskia    
    If Shenee is in Australia chances are she is going to be taking English lessons already.

    As the others have said, it can be a bit tricky getting used to the trot. Ideally you won't be "bouncing" around but either sitting the trot (where you stay in the saddle) or rising (also known as posting) which is where you stand up a little one stride, and sit down the other. If you're not used to the rhythm it would probably seem a bit bouncy!

    A lot of it is just time. You have to ride and practice and then you get it and it becomes pretty natural. A lot of riding is done at the trot so you should get used to it :) Cantering is hard in its own way, and bouncy in its own way.

    Where in Australia are you?
    oh ok yeh it does feel bouncy lol so if I keep practising and doing the trot ill get used too it and get better at it?? And im in Queensland whys that?
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        12-19-2012, 12:26 PM
      #12
    Trained
    I post this video a lot because I think it applies to both trotting and cantering, and the idea is the same in English and Western riding, although the style varies a little. It helped me to see how my body needs to respond to the horse, even if I have a hard time doing it:


    With a slow jog, you can let your weight hold you in the saddle. As the trot gets faster, your back will need to flow more with the horse. The canter has a lot more power behind it. If you try to let your weight keep you in the saddle, you will end up flying in formation with your horse. The photo below shows me about 30 seconds into my first attempt at cantering. I was using my weight to keep me in the saddle and it wasn't enough. It is ugly, but you can learn from my mistake - your weight will NOT keep you in the saddle, and sitting the trot using weight alone is really just 'bouncing the trot'. Learning to sit the trot will help you when you canter. [Note - it was also Trooper's first canter in several years - he was unbalanced too!]



    I'd recommend trying to loosen up your lower back and flowing with the horse at a trot. It will help when you go to a canter, although the rhythm and power changes. Posting is a good skill, but don't use it to escape learning to sit the trot.

    However, here is a thread I found very helpful when I started cantering. My lower back is stiff from an injury 4 years ago, and I found a half-seat or my *******ized version of it allowed me to canter balanced and without fear. With time, I found it easier to relax back and settle into the saddle with the motion of the horse, because I had learned the rhythm and balance in my untrained half seat. It is easier to learn to canter if you can relax on YOUR schedule, rather than needing to get it perfect the very first time:

    Riding the canter in half seat
         
        12-19-2012, 01:27 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Hahaha..... yes, I was VERY nervous when I was learning how to trot. I have a relatively large draft and I had never EVER ridden a horse before... First couple of months (until I found my seat), she would step from a walk into a light trot and I'd be like....WOAAAAHHHHH we're WALKING... lol, I didn't want to trot at all.

    Once I figured out how proper length stirrups gave me a triangular/tripod base (for lack of a better explanation), I was stuck on her like crazy glue and we were trotting with no problems and even worked into a few canters. Although, I haven't cantered enough yet to figure out how to quickly/easily get into sync with her body movement. It'll come though... :)
         
        12-19-2012, 01:31 PM
      #14
    Started
    I used to be terrified to trot, but now I can't stop loping. To me, loping is better than a trot. Once I got into a lope, I couldn't stop. Now every time I do lope, I giggle the whole time!!
         
        12-20-2012, 11:27 AM
      #15
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by DraftGuy    
    hahaha..... yes, I was VERY nervous when I was learning how to trot. I have a relatively large draft and I had never EVER ridden a horse before... First couple of months (until I found my seat), she would step from a walk into a light trot and I'd be like....WOAAAAHHHHH we're WALKING... lol, I didn't want to trot at all.

    Once I figured out how proper length stirrups gave me a triangular/tripod base (for lack of a better explanation), I was stuck on her like crazy glue and we were trotting with no problems and even worked into a few canters. Although, I haven't cantered enough yet to figure out how to quickly/easily get into sync with her body movement. It'll come though... :)
    Lol very True I havent gotten a horse as of yet looking at the moment tho! Haha I wish I could stick too the horse like crazy glue 247 that way id never fall off and stop hurting myself lol but I guess that's just apart of riding hay!
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        12-20-2012, 12:00 PM
      #16
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by amberly    
    I used to be terrified to trot, but now I can't stop loping. To me, loping is better than a trot. Once I got into a lope, I couldn't stop. Now every time I do lope, I giggle the whole time!!
    what exactly is loping?? Never herd of that before
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        12-20-2012, 02:23 PM
      #17
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Shenee    
    what exactly is loping?? Never herd of that before
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Cantering is the English term and Loping is the Western term for relaxed running (not quite full out gallop)
         
        12-21-2012, 07:48 PM
      #18
    Foal
    Ohh ok cool
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        12-21-2012, 11:54 PM
      #19
    Weanling
    I was scared too when I first started trotting. Going in short bursts helps build confidence. At first I could barely handle 50 feet and now I can keep going for ages. :)
         
        12-26-2012, 12:29 PM
      #20
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tarpan    
    I was scared too when I first started trotting. Going in short bursts helps build confidence. At first I could barely handle 50 feet and now I can keep going for ages. :)
    oh heaps cool hopefully it works out that way for me.. Lol sure hope so
    Posted via Mobile Device
         

    Quick Reply
    Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
    Message:
    Options

    Register Now

    In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

    Already have a Horse Forum account?
    Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

    New to the Horse Forum?
    Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

    User Name:
    Password
    Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
    Password:
    Confirm Password:
    Email Address
    Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
    Email Address:

    Log-in

    Human Verification

    In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


    Old Thread Warning
    This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Learning to post the trot. HighonEquine English Riding 2 10-09-2012 12:23 AM
    To trot, or not to trot? That is the question... Griffith361 Endurance Riding 16 09-08-2012 09:45 PM
    Learning to trim Hooves, nervous! DoubleS Horse Health 4 07-15-2012 12:59 PM
    Learning to Trot SpiritJordanRivers Horse Training 19 06-18-2010 06:33 PM
    Is it correct to sit trot over trot poles? pcmum Horse Riding Critique 5 04-23-2009 10:24 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:43 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0