Who would you hire?
 
 

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Who would you hire?

This is a discussion on Who would you hire? within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Hirer a horse trainer
  • Hiring a trainer for an equine business

 
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    03-12-2011, 07:38 PM
  #1
Foal
I am wanting to go to college to become a horse trainer. Yet I met some one the other day who said it would be a bad idea to go to college as most people would not be willing to hire people who went to college because they'd have to retrain them their way. That got me thinking about whether or not it would be a good idea to go to college for this. So that brings me to ask if you were looking for a trainer would you hire one that has a college degree in horse training or just some one who has hands on experience? And why?
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    03-12-2011, 11:22 PM
  #2
Yearling
It would depend. I would look at the methods of the trainer I was looking at hiring before I looked for a degree, or lack there of. I think going to college, and getting experience at the same time is your best bet. Do the work and get the degree, but also get experience doing training on your own. Good luck!
     
    03-12-2011, 11:42 PM
  #3
Green Broke
I didn't know that you could go to college to be a horse trainer. That's just awesome.
I think education of any kind is never a bad. So I would definitely go with the college thing. You can always do internships with different places & trainers during breaks to get experience. Plus you will probably make connections with horse people in college that you might not normally meet which will only broaden your experience.
Learn as much as you can then find you owe style.
     
    03-13-2011, 12:09 AM
  #4
Foal
Do the college thing. As mentioned, you'll develop horse contacts and get plenty of experience. Plus, if being a horse trainer doesn't work out, you'll still have a degree. It may be in horse training/barn management/etc, but for a lot of places, they don't care so much what degree just that you have a degree at all.
     
    03-13-2011, 01:47 AM
  #5
Trained
I agree wih Opus: if the trainer thing needs ti be put aside, most employers onky look at the piece of paper, not what's written on it. They could care less what you have a degree in, just that you have one.

Plus, in college, you can develop some training methods of your own that you can add to yiur bank of knowledge.
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    03-13-2011, 03:46 AM
  #6
Banned
If you're serious about working with horses for a living, the best route to go IMO is to go to a school where you can major in business and minor in equine studies and then also apprentice yourself to a trainer or find a working student position in your discipline.

Here's my reasoning:

Many horsepeople give up on making a living as horsepeople because they're terrible businesspeople, not because they're poor horsepeople.

A degree in Equine Studies, without customer service skills, people skills, computer skills and business skills will only get you a job saying "Would you like fries with that?"

People chose trainers based on reputation, word of mouth, results in the show ring and with problem horses. Your brand new Equine Studies degree won't give you any of that, and your new diploma won't bring you training clientele.

The college education, combined with the real world experience is the better way to go.
     
    03-15-2011, 02:55 PM
  #7
Foal
Thanks for all the replies, I am really thinking I'm going to go to college for this. Now I just need to decide wether or not I want to go and continue in the Equine Business Management program that I was accepted into. Or try and get into the Horse Training and Management program after the first semester like we planned. Both courses have an internship for the 3rd or end of 2nd semester with well known ranches and people in the field I'd be interested in working with. I am also working on developing my own style of training and reputation, I know I need that the most. Thanks for the advice, its been helpful.
     
    03-15-2011, 02:58 PM
  #8
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by gaelgirl    
I would look at the methods of the trainer I was looking at hiring before I looked for a degree, or lack there of.
Totally!

Quote:
Originally Posted by maura    
If you're serious about working with horses for a living, the best route to go IMO is to go to a school where you can major in business and minor in equine studies and then also apprentice yourself to a trainer or find a working student position in your discipline.

Here's my reasoning:

Many horsepeople give up on making a living as horsepeople because they're terrible businesspeople, not because they're poor horsepeople.

A degree in Equine Studies, without customer service skills, people skills, computer skills and business skills will only get you a job saying "Would you like fries with that?"

People chose trainers based on reputation, word of mouth, results in the show ring and with problem horses. Your brand new Equine Studies degree won't give you any of that, and your new diploma won't bring you training clientele.

The college education, combined with the real world experience is the better way to go.
What Maura said.
     
    03-15-2011, 03:03 PM
  #9
Yearling
I think go get your degree and on your breaks do as much work experoence as possible get your name out there and develop contacts
     
    03-15-2011, 03:44 PM
  #10
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by maura    
If you're serious about working with horses for a living, the best route to go IMO is to go to a school where you can major in business and minor in equine studies and then also apprentice yourself to a trainer or find a working student position in your discipline.

Here's my reasoning:

Many horsepeople give up on making a living as horsepeople because they're terrible businesspeople, not because they're poor horsepeople.

A degree in Equine Studies, without customer service skills, people skills, computer skills and business skills will only get you a job saying "Would you like fries with that?"

People chose trainers based on reputation, word of mouth, results in the show ring and with problem horses. Your brand new Equine Studies degree won't give you any of that, and your new diploma won't bring you training clientele.

The college education, combined with the real world experience is the better way to go.
Agree. I'm majoring in business, and actually, I am helping a trainer tonight on the business part of the training. She has troubles communicating to clients and is trying to expand. She also works independently and has troubles budgeting, saving and keeping steady clients. Which is, what I assume, probably the biggest problem with a job like training.

Plus I'm sure any college that offers equine degrees have many many connections to get you equine related jobs during breaks. Right there would be a huge deciding factor to go for me.

But to answer the question, degree or not, I'm judging you by word of mouth and by watching you ride and handle several different types of horses. But that all can be traced back to your experience.
     

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