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Why are riding pants so tight? (Bear with me)

This is a discussion on Why are riding pants so tight? (Bear with me) within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        10-19-2013, 01:28 AM
      #61
    Super Moderator
    BSMS, the flared breeches served two purposes. First, the flares kept brambles from contacting directly on the skin. It allowed the fabric to be pull away from the skin so that thorns didn't tear the cavalry/foxhunters up. Secondly, they were loose because there was NO stretch in these fabrics. So, if you wanted to be able to bend over, you had to have a baggy seat. I wore more than my share of flared breeches and still have some of them.

    Now, with the addition of lycra to fabrics making them stretchy, the breeches can be snugger. Especially since most riders are not riding in real rough territory. Trust me when I say that today's breeches won't last a moment in real rough terrain. It will just be a bunch of pulls.

    So yes, yesterday's breeches were baggy because of fabric and function. However, they DID rub. I know this well.....Todays fabrics are so comfortable with the stretch, you almost feel like you have very little on (if you know what I mean....)
    Kayty, Golden Horse, Clava and 2 others like this.
         
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        10-19-2013, 01:46 AM
      #62
    Super Moderator
    The first cavalry division doesn't wear flared breeches much anymore.





    I guess the modern cavalry has learned how to avoid rubs!!
         
        10-19-2013, 02:07 AM
      #63
    Green Broke
    Maybe some of it has to do with posting? Like if a person posts the trot or not? Or maybe it's the style of saddle that has something to do with chaffing?

    For instance, I ride western and I can do 5 hour trail rides in stretchy jeans or basically whatever pants I want to sacrifice to the trees and brush and I never have chaffing problems from the pants. Sometimes I will get bruises from scraping into trees and sometimes I have mystery bruises on the insides of my knees, but basically, I can ride 5 hours in the mountains, up and down hills, some trotting and cantering, but mostly walking, and my pants never give me a lick of trouble. I am overweight too, so I think my chubby legs would be more prone to rubbing than most.

    On a western saddle, the stirrup fenders kind of move with your leg, but on an English saddle, you have a thin stirrup leather moving over a leather flap that doesn't move with your leg, could that be a part of the problem? That and posting the trot?

    This reminds me of some of the threads I've read in the past about gloves. How some people can't hardly ride without gloves and I never use gloves unless it's winter and my hands are cold. But I don't need them to protect my hands.....probably because I ride western and generally ride without contact. But even that doesn't always hold true, because my Fox Trotter can be a real handful coming home sometimes, and I still never feel the need to wear gloves to protect my hands.

    I'm sure breeches are comfy. But as I ride western I've never felt the need to try them. All summer long I ride in stretchy jeans. All winter long I ride in sweat pants. If I need more grip or protection from the brush, I wear chinks over the top of them. Now that is a fashion statement........chinks over sweatpants!
         
        10-19-2013, 02:12 AM
      #64
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Allison Finch    
    The first cavalry division doesn't wear flared breeches much anymore.





    I guess the modern cavalry has learned how to avoid rubs!!

    *swoon* can't wait till I'm part of this unit!
         
        10-19-2013, 03:24 AM
      #65
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsms    
    Hmmm...90% of my riding has been in an Australian saddle which is a variant of an English saddle, always in blue jeans ($15.88 at Wal-Mart). Nope, no rubs, burns or scuffed saddles, including my Bates English saddles. And no, I don't need to worry about "underwear lines" in my Wranglers.

    We also have forum members who ride endurance in baseball pants (kind of like baggy sweatpants). And the Cavalry rode in uniform pants, and I doubt they had to many men on sick call due to 'friction burns'. My wife uses sweatpants for riding without complaint.

    Looks. Or fashion. But NOT because looser pants result in burns, chaffing, etc.
    I think we ride in different ways, no? I ride with leg and hand contact, and you ride with no hand contact until you want something to happen. I would get an eyebrow raised if I dropped the reins on a trail ride.

    I ride in jeans from time to time and I always regret it afterwards, as it carves into my skin.

    I don't think that makes your riding any better, it's just different. I feel that I am engaging my horse while you might be just sitting there. You might feel that you are not forcing tour horse into anything, while you perceive that I mist be forcing my horse. To me it's just different, and I would suggest that I am working harder for jeans to not bother me.
         
        10-19-2013, 09:35 AM
      #66
    Green Broke
    I have ridden in breeches ever since I "discovered" them when I was in my late twenties. There were still some "elephant ear" jods around back then-not the best look when one is around 5' tall! I do still have my first pair that I took lessons in back then. Now, almost 40 years later-I wear English style riding pants while trail riding-whether I'm in my Western or Aussie saddle. I haven't been in my English saddle in a long time. I just got my first pair of chinks yesterday-I need to clean & recondition them, but they will help me deal w/the cactus & other trail issues that are rampant here in Arizona. I also wear tall boots-Sometimes English ones, sometimes Western ones & I also have some insulated ones for winter riding. I may be in my 60's but I still look pretty good in my riding attire!
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        10-19-2013, 09:42 AM
      #67
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Allison Finch    
    The first cavalry division doesn't wear flared breeches much anymore.





    I guess the modern cavalry has learned how to avoid rubs!!
    Those are pre flared breeches era uniforms from the last half of the 1800's when they were still "trousers" (so not "modern" Cav...technically speaking ). They're wool (as is the jacket) so you better hope you don't have a skin reaction to them (silk PJ pants underneath work great in Winter). Wonderful in the Winter. Brutal in the Summer, but they do wick sweat really well and you do get use to it. Also, they are heavier than jeans, but looser than jeans. Mine didn't have the yellow stripe though (I rode for the "both" sides so I kept it neutral to cut costs....just had to swap jackets )
    And note that they are NOT wearing the phony yellow neckerchief that Hollywood loves to put on them (it's a standing joke about Hollywood vs accuracy)
    Flared breeches replaced those trousers, but had a relatively short era mostly in the first part of the 1900's due to horse cav being replaced by mechanized cav). Although officers of certain branches of various countries still wore the flared breeches (because they were "officers") as late as the 1940's even though they weren't part of a mounted unit. Many traditions die hard.
         
        10-19-2013, 09:46 AM
      #68
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Allison Finch    
    The first cavalry division doesn't wear flared breeches much anymore.

    I guess the modern cavalry has learned how to avoid rubs!!
    They are not wearing skin-tight breeches, though. The men in the picture you posted will not walk around wondering about their "underwear lines".

    As I've said repeatedly to ears that refuse to hear: If you LIKE wearing breeches, do so! The only justification you need is "I like them".

    But it is just silly to say that if you do NOT wear breeches, then your pants will cause your leg to go forward, or that you will lose contact with your horse, or that you will be off-balance, or that you will have legs covered in cuts and bruises after an hour of riding. That simply contradicts the experience of countless riders riding in a variety of styles, including English.
         
        10-19-2013, 09:57 AM
      #69
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Allison Finch    
    BSMS, the flared breeches served two purposes. First, the flares kept brambles from contacting directly on the skin. It allowed the fabric to be pull away from the skin so that thorns didn't tear the cavalry/foxhunters up. Secondly, they were loose because there was NO stretch in these fabrics. So, if you wanted to be able to bend over, you had to have a baggy seat. I wore more than my share of flared breeches and still have some of them.
    Well.....not quite
    Cav went from trousers to flared breeches and "trousers" were just the old term for "pants". They were simply loosely fitting pants and they worked great for over 100 years. I've worn them (a LOT) and they are just as easy to move around, bend, do whatever in as any other pare of pants or flared breeches. In many respects they're easier to deal with than flare breeches once you're off the horse and about the same when mounted. The old trousers tended to be pretty heavy (heavier than jeans) and I don't recall any problems with briars or brambles. If that had been the case the Cav would have been in chaps before flared breeches . I'm not sure why they ever went to the flared breeches (which I've always thought wore horrible looking), but it was very fashionable for a time and I will concede that they are comfortable for riding
         
        10-19-2013, 10:08 AM
      #70
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by bsms    
    I'd love to hear how you know this. My jeans seem pretty inanimate, but maybe that is because they are the $15.88 ones...
    I don't know it is my opinion. It may just be me but whenever I wear my jeans while my jodphurs are in the wash my leg sticks out infront of me and no matter how hard I try it will not come underneath me. My mum and my instructor both declare a visible different from jeans to trousers made out of strechy material like leggings not necesarily jodphurs. I will post pictures just a day apart and you can decide. Please note it is the same saddle. And if you argue that it was a different pony I will shoot your head off as we own around 14 ponies of all shapes and sizes and I have to ride them all at some point. I am used to changing my style of riding to suit the pony with out changing my position. Also please note that I am not an especially amazing rider. One more thing that every one keeps saying is that jodphurs are made to prevent "pinching". Yes that is one of the sale points now a days but It is your position that prevents that no matter what saddle or stirrups you have. If your leg is in the right position you should not feel a thing even in the thinest material.
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