Why start them so young? - Page 18
 
 

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Why start them so young?

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        07-09-2014, 02:59 PM
      #171
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by rbarlo32    
    Clava we don't even get price money up here and when we did it was 1 when it coasts hundreds to get everything needed for the show and I was just shoeing in hand, the royal highland show o think you get 160 price money but it would have cost us wells over 2000 to get our stallion their we were about to book the ferry and enter then the car ate all the money we saved up he had a huge chance of winning championand all. You don't tend to show in the UK for money as there is no money in it.
    It's no different here in the states. Unless you're high level, even then there is hardly any money unless you win
    COWCHICK77 and GotaDunQH like this.
         
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        07-09-2014, 03:39 PM
      #172
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by .Delete.    
    It's no different here in the states. Unless you're high level, even then there is hardly any money unless you win
    Agree. Sometimes there will be "added" money to those payback classes. I was at the Mass QHA show in May, and they had a $500 added non-pro WP class, had to show all days in it (2 times). They were begging to get entries....finally got 5 of them so they could run the class. I was amazed they were announcing they needed entries! And this wasn't a small show....there were 37 in my showmanship class. There doesn't seem to be a big interest in them.
         
        07-09-2014, 03:43 PM
      #173
    Super Moderator
    I've noticed that prize money in showing/competing in general is a lot higher than in the UK, not sure how much of that is down to how far people have to travel to compete and the costs of staying at that place for several days or longer so people expect to at least cover some of those costs.
    Sorry of topic.
         
        07-09-2014, 03:47 PM
      #174
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GotaDunQH    
    Agree. Sometimes there will be "added" money to those payback classes. I was at the Mass QHA show in May, and they had a $500 added non-pro WP class, had to show all days in it (2 times). They were begging to get entries....finally got 5 of them so they could run the class. I was amazed they were announcing they needed entries! And this wasn't a small show....there were 37 in my showmanship class. There doesn't seem to be a big interest in them.
    37 in a showmanship class is small to me, I can understand why they were begging for entries. In my experience I mostly traveled to shows that had 70-100 people for trail, SMS, etc. All the pattern classes are usually packed. However I've seen consistently 20-30 people per pleasure class. Usually 1-2 splits.
         
        07-09-2014, 06:16 PM
      #175
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dbarabians    
    The profits are not made from showing the horse. The horses value increases but the big money is from breeding those winners. A proven show horse can command a good stud fee and the value of the foals increases. Starting a colt and showing him early then retiring him or her to the breeding shed is the goal.
    Also those collts from a promising sire or dam need to be shown as early as possible. The sooner you can prove your stallion passes on his abilities the sooner the mares start lining up for breeding. Since the first colts wont be shown for 3 years after the stallion or mare is bred and you need several foal crops to prove your stallion. Shalom
    I agree with you that showing and campaigning along with LTE makes a stallion desirable to fetch the higher breeding fees. If you look at the million dollar sires in the NRCHA only a very small amount actually won the Snaffle Bit in their three year old year. Most of the them showed big in the derbies, super stakes, etc. AND passed on their talent to their offspring like you said. In my opinion it takes quite a bit of money and risk to get to that point where the foal crops are winning and proving that the talent is being passed on. I think it's a tough row to hoe to have a top quality stallion bringing the big breeding fees. I worked with a horse that has +$350,000 LTE in the NRCHA, AQHA, NRHA, won the World's Greatest and the Magnificent Seven, yet his breeding fee is only $2,500. I will never claim to be an expert on breeding but for all the years in training this horse has been, advertising, show fees, etc. I don't see it as being lucrative. Correct me if I am wrong.
    However, if it was High Brow Cat at $22,500 a straw, your making money .


    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SlideStop    
    It might not makes sense for the average Joe to go out and try to to buy a yearling to turn into a futurities, but for a trainer who's trying to make it big.. Yeah!!

    Don't forget to tack on all the fame and popularity out of this! He or she can get many of those expenses (transport, entry fees, possibly tack, etc) covered by sponsors. Then there will be the increased in clients between buying and training. Also, endorsement deals and an increase in the sale of any product the trainer might be selling (ie Stacy westfall and her halter). They maybe be able to increase they amount of money they ask for training or doing clinics.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    It does make sense!
    Last years Snaffle Bit is a perfect example. When we moved back to NV from TX we were supposed to winter some cattle on a ranch in the middle of nowhere. Looking at the NRCHA directory for a nearby trainer the closest one was a guy named Nick Dowers in Dyer. Nick who, where? (we ended up not going down there so I never rode with the guy)
    But just a year later guess who wins the 2013 Snaffle Bit, Nick Dowers on his stallion Time For The Diamond. And now people have heard of him. That is getting your foot in the door for getting the higher end clients that have the money to send you several show prospects upping your chances for a winner.
         
        07-09-2014, 06:27 PM
      #176
    Yearling
    Delete the 160 is the top price money you will find anywhere for my breed and apart from the breed show is the biggest show for Shetlands it's a 4 days long and holds the record for the most visitors in the country as it is an agricultural show. This is for in hand as I have yet to show a shetland ridden as I don't know anyone small enough to ride at a show the biggest show for that is the horse of the year show but that is a mixed dartmoor, exmoor and shetland class so shetlands rarely win.
         
        07-09-2014, 06:32 PM
      #177
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by rbarlo32    
    Delete the 160 is the top price money you will find anywhere for my breed and apart from the breed show is the biggest show for Shetlands it's a 4 days long and holds the record for the most visitors in the country as it is an agricultural show. This is for in hand as I have yet to show a shetland ridden as I don't know anyone small enough to ride at a show the biggest show for that is the horse of the year show but that is a mixed dartmoor, exmoor and shetland class so shetlands rarely win.
    You're not speaking English to me I have no clue about breed or showing standards for ponies. I am an AQHA person to the fullest. We don't have to deal with people breaking out ponies like that. 90% of our pony shows are in-hand or driving here.
         
        07-09-2014, 06:39 PM
      #178
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by .Delete.    
    37 in a showmanship class is small to me, I can understand why they were begging for entries. In my experience I mostly traveled to shows that had 70-100 people for trail, SMS, etc. All the pattern classes are usually packed. However I've seen consistently 20-30 people per pleasure class. Usually 1-2 splits.
    Funny because this particular show is the only show Mass QHA puts on and it's always huge by our standards. Two years ago I went to the VA QHA Spring show, the one that used to be called the East Coast Champ show. There were 14 in Nov Am SMS....that's it. The Amateur and Select even smaller. The only classes that were quite large with splits were the Youth classes. For one of the "big" AQHA shows....the VA QHA was small in comparison. But I've heard that show has gotten smaller every year.
         
        07-09-2014, 06:41 PM
      #179
    Yearling
    My grammar and spelling suck too which really doesn't help.
         
        07-09-2014, 09:01 PM
      #180
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GotaDunQH    
    Funny because this particular show is the only show Mass QHA puts on and it's always huge by our standards. Two years ago I went to the VA QHA Spring show, the one that used to be called the East Coast Champ show. There were 14 in Nov Am SMS....that's it. The Amateur and Select even smaller. The only classes that were quite large with splits were the Youth classes. For one of the "big" AQHA shows....the VA QHA was small in comparison. But I've heard that show has gotten smaller every year.
    They all seem to be getting smaller except the congress
         

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