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Worst Examples of Conformation

This is a discussion on Worst Examples of Conformation within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • +falts in a foals eye for the show ring

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    05-13-2013, 02:18 AM
  #81
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by toto    
Conformation Tutorial

^ that's actually educational. If you want to learn conformation I suggest havin a read.

Seeing extreme falts and medical conditions that people are calling 'faults' aint doin much for ya-- how can you point out a fault if alls you seen is extreme cases of it? It will look flawless to you.


I mean this in the most respectful way- but its not your business to stop someone from breeding their mare to anyones stud.. if they can't see the stud is flawed they probably shouldnt be breeding- period. Not to mention the mare is probably just as flawed..
As for that last part of your post, there are a ton of people who don't understand the finer points of breeding. They see a pretty color and want it in foal form. Seeing this may show people what happens when two conformationally challenged are bred. It results on a horse that may be so badly conformed he can't comfortably carry his own weight.

And I agree with the person who said she needed extreme examples as a reference. I am that way as well. If it jumps out at me, then I can understand less dramatic variations of the same thing.

And of course that thread is educational, but does that mean this one isn't honestly you guys, this arguing is pointless. Post and learn from this thread or unsubscribe. Simple as that.
Posted via Mobile Device
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    05-13-2013, 02:25 AM
  #82
Started
I will post two of mine with severe lordosis. We have never been ashamed of these horses in the 20-something years they have been in the family. Neither were bred for these faults, they just happened as a result of very traumatic baby-hoods. The bay was an orphan whose mother died giving birth to him. The chestnut was born straight backed, but suffered an injury so terrible it shut his immune system down. Both were wonderful show horses. The chestnut was showing in 10 and under classes when he was three. There is a reason we have kept these two their entire lives, and it is not because of their backs. They are family.

Edit: it seems the wrong picture came up. That is just of the bay's back. The chestnut's is just as bad.
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    05-13-2013, 02:30 AM
  #83
Yearling
Wow, this has gone downhill.

I believe this thread was started as a discussion/show and tell of bad conformation. It has been turned into an argument because of certain people.

So how about those that disagree with the purpose of this thread leave it be and let the mods make the decisions about whether or not it is suitable?

I, too, find it interesting to see these examples of extreme physical faults, whether they be a result of medical problems or conformation. Yes, some people seem to be taking it too far and bashing.

Actually, I do suggest deleting this thread, but having it reposted as something more specific - as a discussion of undesirable physical flaws. I'm a visual learner, as many people are, and seeing these flaws 'in the flesh' makes them a lot easier to understand. This thread offers many different examples of each, or at least it could, if people would sit back and let it be what it should.

So how about this - those with problems with this thread can totter off and complain to mods about it, whilst the rest of us who want to learn can share photos and opinions on what is/could be wrong with the horses shown.
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    05-13-2013, 02:32 AM
  #84
Yearling
Oh wow, LadyDreamer. I've never even heard of lordosis, and your post shows exactly what this thread should be about! Learning about new faults, conformational or otherwise.

I am now off to do some research on the matter!
     
    05-13-2013, 02:48 AM
  #85
Yearling
Just a thought, but it might also help to post a picture of an ideal/ normal horse next to a picture of a horse with a certain flaw- for instance, an ideal hind leg compared to the horribly posty horse above. I know that really helps me to see that visual, with maybe an explanation as to what to look for, like what angle is ideal for the hock and such.
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    05-13-2013, 02:53 AM
  #86
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by LadyDreamer    
I will post two of mine with severe lordosis. We have never been ashamed of these horses in the 20-something years they have been in the family. Neither were bred for these faults, they just happened as a result of very traumatic baby-hoods. The bay was an orphan whose mother died giving birth to him. The chestnut was born straight backed, but suffered an injury so terrible it shut his immune system down. Both were wonderful show horses. The chestnut was showing in 10 and under classes when he was three. There is a reason we have kept these two their entire lives, and it is not because of their backs. They are family.

Edit: it seems the wrong picture came up. That is just of the bay's back. The chestnut's is just as bad.
I can't see the pictures. :(
Out of curiosity, how does being an orphan and having a shut down immune system result in lordosis/ sway back? I'm not being snippy, I've just never heard of that. Can lordosis result from stress?
     
    05-13-2013, 02:58 AM
  #87
Trained
Subbing for ejumacashanol purposes.
     
    05-13-2013, 03:27 AM
  #88
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by GamingGrrl    
I believe that the owner of the third horse in that post posted him....not sure why.....
Posted via Mobile Device
i posted miover because it is apparently rude to take random horses offline so I did miover instead.

But I just don't understand how this thread can go downhill like seriously there is nothing to argue about LOL

I don't find anything in this thread worth arguing about LOL
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    05-13-2013, 03:30 AM
  #89
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by toto    
That bein said- if you don't know the horses medical history and post somethin falsely its teachin the 'newbies' the wrong thing. Why do that to people? If theres one thing I can not stand its havin someine I think I can trust tell me somethin wrong- and me believe it and say it to someone else and them telling me everything I've learned is completely wrong and I have to learn all over..

Its like sayin I can have a popsicle when in reality its a frozen turd.


Tearing apart your horses conformation? I have no problems with you posting your own horse here-- don't know why you would but its a different thing when its someone elses love you destroyed. In my opinion- if its not your horse you shouldnt be posting in a thread like this ment for people to 'tear them appart' conformation wise..


What if one of the owners of these horses sees people posting false things about their horses and bashing the bloodline publicly? That would destroy someones business- someones livelihood.. im not talkin about bad confo but the whole impressive deal.. people breed to horses like that because that's what the show ring has done to them- they want to see those big muscled up horses-- he wasnt even a faulty conformation- just a buncha false information.

Its messed up and wrong on so many levels.. id be mad if that was my horse.. that's all.
majority of pics are under google image search...this is no different then posting people utube vids and critasizing them without there permission

No different then having a thread called...worst horse ads, and dissing those ads, anyone from here could of posted those ads
     
    05-13-2013, 07:37 AM
  #90
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracer    
Oh wow, LadyDreamer. I've never even heard of lordosis, and your post shows exactly what this thread should be about! Learning about new faults, conformational or otherwise.

I am now off to do some research on the matter!
In American Saddlebreds, they have just recently(last few years) found the specific gene marker for lordosis in American Saddlebreds. Funny thing is, horses can have the genes and not show it(THAT kind of low back is apparent as a baby) and not ever show it. I have seen mildly to moderately lordotic mares produce strong and straight backed colts.

What we believe(and something the researchers are looking into) is that environmental factors, such as developmental nutrition and the unnecessary stress of a major trauma play a huge role in it. The orphan suffered a traumatic birth, and did not receive everything he needed from his mother. He was given the best supplemental milk my parents could get 20+ years ago, but there was just something in his situation that caused his back to drop. His full brother, also a successful show horse was as straight backed as you could want. A very well made horse.

With the chestnut, again, no major flaws present in either parent. No foals on either side would have you believe the gene was there. His dam died before I knew her, but his sire was yet another we kept until he died of old age and was my best teacher. This horse when he was very young, days old I believe(I will have to ask my parents as the horse and I were born the same year. Lol.) took a thorn in the eye. This injury shocked his little system and shut his immune system down. He was very sick, and wasn't able to process the nutrients he was given as effectively as a healthy colt. Thanks to an experimental drug our vet was developing(which was successful) he eventually healed, but the stress of the situation, deficiency, and the right few genes caused it.

There was one mare I wish I had had the money to experiment with. She was a mild case who was a VERY hard keeper. She came to us in foal and lean and her filly was born low backed. I really wish I had had the money to get and keep her fat and in top health and see if she would have a straight backed colt. She died a few years after she was sold, so I never could.

They were perfectly sound to ride. Not too much out of kindness, and they were Jr. Exhibitor horses their whole careers. 90% of their show training/conditioning was done in the jog cart. They had special saddles and special padding, and they were good. I remember being put on the bay horse bareback when I was really little. It was like riding a reverse camel. Lol!

They are stellar equitation horses. They are a neat sensation to ride. They way their backs put you, you will not move. Your leg will be good, your posture good, and they will hold you in place. You would have to try to fall off. They all seem to have incredibly good personalities and temperaments too. I don't know if it has anything to do with the back itself or something else, but they are all just generally perfect in mind.

I find it really neat that horses can have such a severe spinal deformity and not have it effect their usability too much. A human with a mild spinal deformity can be super messed up both physically and mentally. Horses are so cool.

I hope that helped!
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