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Would you buy a horse that rears?

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    10-16-2012, 01:54 PM
  #31
Foal
My trainer found the horse and said she'd be good for me but my grandad said that she was the one and I'd have to stick with her. So they discussed it betwen themselves and chose her it had nothing to do with me

Also GoldenHorse it's a proper rear her feet were above the roof of the car
     
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    10-16-2012, 03:44 PM
  #32
Trained
No I would never buy a horse that bites ,bucks, bolts or rears
Very unsafe even if you have ridden for years
     
    10-16-2012, 04:24 PM
  #33
Green Broke
I am apalled that your safety is taking second priority here in the minds of the adults involved. I see you mentioned your grandad - are your your parents also involved here or are you in his care/custody at this time? Is he paying for the horse activities and that is why he has the final word?
     
    10-16-2012, 04:59 PM
  #34
Trained
The day a horse of mine takes up rearing is the day they go to a trainer. It is well over my experience level, I do not have the tools to deal with it. So obviously, I would never buy a rearer.

When you advertise this horse, you need to be totally honest. I don't care what your parents say. Take a pair of clippers and shave "I REAR," into her coat if you have to. Advertise her as "experienced handler ONLY," and explain her issues. Her fear response is to rear, so far she reacts to bikes and whatever else.

I'm not sure you'll get any money for her. I would price her at a couple hundred just to get rid of some of the awful people, but I'm not sure anyone would bite. I bet with a confident trainer she could turn around, though. Good luck!
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    10-16-2012, 05:16 PM
  #35
Weanling
I feel very sorry for you, this is a very scary situation, for any rider, confident, novice and all in between.

I haven't read all the posts from people, so I'm sorry if I'm repeating ideas (sorry I know it's kinda rude not to read everyone's, I do apologise)

What I would do, is try and get in touch with the seller. Ask them if they were aware of it (and they probably were, but will probably deny it) tell them the problem, ask if they know why she's doing it. Tell them you're very upset that she was sold as a novice horse when she clearly is not (even if they deny knowing about the rearing, still voice that you're very upset)

Get the horse insured for 3rd party, I know it will cost, but it'll cost a lot more if she does damage.

Don't take her out riding, walk her out, preferably to the bmx place and keep her at a distance where she is comfortable (or just a little uncomfortable - head up, looking a little worried but not rearing) Praise her, tell her she's the most brilliant horse in the world, feed her treats (I know not everyone gives treats but I would in this situation), rub her neck make her feel generally comfortable, then take her home the moment she shows signs of relaxing - dropping her head, licking and chewing, one big sigh/snort out of air.

The next time, take her to the same point, make her feel good, and then walk her a few steps closer (still leading by the way, not riding), again, make her feel comfortable, praise, rubs Etc.

Each time, go to the same place, and once she is settled there, go forward until she settles, forward again. It will take a very long time, but it is the only thing I could come up with that is fairly safe (as safe as possible with a rearer)

Also, ask your bmx friend to bring his bike to where you keep her. If he's willing (if not, get an old bike no one cares for) put it on the ground, let her sniff it, like it, chew it, paw at it. Then stand it up, let her do the same (if she knocks it over, she might spook, fair enough, just pick it up again, and let her have another go, let her keep knocking it until it doesn't bother her any more) Then get your bmx-er friend to cycle around, at a distance. Let her watch (keep her on a lead rope for this) let him cycle round, and then take her to a point a bit closer, make her feel comfortable, then a bit closer and keep repeating until she's really close but relaxed. It may take several sessions.

I'm not sure how you could desensitise her to motorbikes unless you know anyone with one. I hope this might help...

If you don't feel comfortable with a horse, don't risk your or anyone's life. Only do it if you feel you could cope. If you sell this horse, tell the new owner she is good to be ridden (if she is) in the school or in the field, but does need road work, tell them that she is very uncomfortable with bikes. I hope you're okay, it is a terrible situation, for any rider.
     
    10-16-2012, 08:04 PM
  #36
Weanling
I would never ever knowingly buy a horse that reared. About a year and a half ago I bought what I was told was a kid safe well broke trail horse. About 3 weeks later I was in intensive care fighting for my life because the horse reared and flipped over on me. I ended up practically giving him away but I made sure the man that bought him knew exactly what the horse was capable of. Good luck curing or selling him but if you do sell him please tell the buyer about this problem. If something were to happen you wouldn't want it on your conscience
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    10-16-2012, 09:16 PM
  #37
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by HollyLolly    
I feel very sorry for you, this is a very scary situation, for any rider, confident, novice and all in between.

I haven't read all the posts from people, so I'm sorry if I'm repeating ideas (sorry I know it's kinda rude not to read everyone's, I do apologise)

What I would do, is try and get in touch with the seller. Ask them if they were aware of it (and they probably were, but will probably deny it) tell them the problem, ask if they know why she's doing it. Tell them you're very upset that she was sold as a novice horse when she clearly is not (even if they deny knowing about the rearing, still voice that you're very upset)

Get the horse insured for 3rd party, I know it will cost, but it'll cost a lot more if she does damage.

Don't take her out riding, walk her out, preferably to the bmx place and keep her at a distance where she is comfortable (or just a little uncomfortable - head up, looking a little worried but not rearing) Praise her, tell her she's the most brilliant horse in the world, feed her treats (I know not everyone gives treats but I would in this situation), rub her neck make her feel generally comfortable, then take her home the moment she shows signs of relaxing - dropping her head, licking and chewing, one big sigh/snort out of air.

The next time, take her to the same point, make her feel good, and then walk her a few steps closer (still leading by the way, not riding), again, make her feel comfortable, praise, rubs Etc.

Each time, go to the same place, and once she is settled there, go forward until she settles, forward again. It will take a very long time, but it is the only thing I could come up with that is fairly safe (as safe as possible with a rearer)

Also, ask your bmx friend to bring his bike to where you keep her. If he's willing (if not, get an old bike no one cares for) put it on the ground, let her sniff it, like it, chew it, paw at it. Then stand it up, let her do the same (if she knocks it over, she might spook, fair enough, just pick it up again, and let her have another go, let her keep knocking it until it doesn't bother her any more) Then get your bmx-er friend to cycle around, at a distance. Let her watch (keep her on a lead rope for this) let him cycle round, and then take her to a point a bit closer, make her feel comfortable, then a bit closer and keep repeating until she's really close but relaxed. It may take several sessions.

I'm not sure how you could desensitise her to motorbikes unless you know anyone with one. I hope this might help...

If you don't feel comfortable with a horse, don't risk your or anyone's life. Only do it if you feel you could cope. If you sell this horse, tell the new owner she is good to be ridden (if she is) in the school or in the field, but does need road work, tell them that she is very uncomfortable with bikes. I hope you're okay, it is a terrible situation, for any rider.


I like what Holly is saying in this
     
    10-16-2012, 09:17 PM
  #38
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by ARTEMISBLOSSOM    
I would never ever knowingly buy a horse that reared. About a year and a half ago I bought what I was told was a kid safe well broke trail horse. About 3 weeks later I was in intensive care fighting for my life because the horse reared and flipped over on me. I ended up practically giving him away but I made sure the man that bought him knew exactly what the horse was capable of. Good luck curing or selling him but if you do sell him please tell the buyer about this problem. If something were to happen you wouldn't want it on your conscience
I am sorry this has happened to you
Are you ok now
     
    10-16-2012, 09:32 PM
  #39
Green Broke
If the horse had potential, I'd have no second thoughts on buying it or not, it'd be at my farm. I've dealt with two rearers, and they both became great horses..for myself. One went to an old lady/husband couple who needed another ploddy trail horse (a mare), and Dude went back to his owner...BUT, he ended up being able to walk into an arena, run a barrel pattern (only 4-7 seconds off winning, he was a draft cross), and walk right back out. He pranced and popped up a bit with other riders, but he knew **** well I'd still whack him good or yank his head around to my knee if he even thought about going up.

IMO, rearing is dangerous, but it's also easily prevented. A horse cannot rear if it's bent..I feel the horse tensing, we go forward and in a small circle..there's no stopping to stand or backing up. After I realized that, no horse has gotten more than 6 inches off the ground before I yanked them to the side and pushed their hind around and around. I let Dude go up on the trails though..otherwise we would've been laying in the bottom of a valley in the creek..But, everytime he started to go up, my crop (or whatever was in my hand atm) would crack him right between the ears.

My main point was..I've had no issues fixing rearers..Dude never reared again with his owner (granted, he hasn't gone into an arena since she took him back), and the mare never reared or caused an issue for the little, old lady riding her around on trails. I'd buy a horse who rears out of fear for myself, I'd buy a horse that rears because it knows it can scare it's rider into getting off to fix and resell.
     
    10-16-2012, 09:36 PM
  #40
Foal
For me, if the horse is green and needs work, like with cantering and can threaten to rear from not understand or not being worked with, there is a chance and a long thought. If its a horse that does it out of the blue, no reason or usually does it for silly reasons, then no :)
     

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