Would you consider this bad horse behavior? - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 29 Old 09-18-2011, 03:39 PM
twh
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I can just imagine what someone accustomed to riding with a twisted wire, shanked (I assume 8") curb bit is going to do with a french link D-ring! Does he even know what a french link is? Of course he can't ride the horse and of course he'd be giving false signals and ignorable signals all over the place.

How's this: take him to an English barn and have him take a lesson there. Really. Do it.
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post #22 of 29 Old 09-18-2011, 03:40 PM Thread Starter
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Yes, that's exactly what he's used to! I will try to talk him into taking a lesson as he would probably listen to a professional better than me. He only knows what a french link is because I showed mine to him and explained what it was called. He'd never seen any bit that didn't have a shank before. I didn't really think about that but you're absolutely right about his signals being ignorable because of the difference! Thank you. Ill try to explain it to him that way!

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post #23 of 29 Old 09-18-2011, 03:42 PM
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Dresden, did you post something? It's showing an empty post under your name.
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post #24 of 29 Old 09-18-2011, 03:46 PM Thread Starter
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I accidently posted an empty post then edited it to say what I meant to say. Stupid phone.
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post #25 of 29 Old 09-18-2011, 03:52 PM
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Ya, when I showed one of my TWH friends a Pelham, she had no clue what it was. I also switched my Walker to a D-ring snaffle from a shanked bit, and when I went for a trail ride with one of my friends, she was horrified and told me I had no brakes without the curb chain. It's just a totally different mentality.
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post #26 of 29 Old 09-18-2011, 04:22 PM
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I had a horse and with me he would go great. Moving forward immediately of aids, jumping, etc. He wasn't a beginners horse though, an ex racehorse who raced for a long time, he was smart, a little crazy at times, strong and he really had his moments but I loved the way he tested people. When people find out you have a horse they always want to ride and you can't really say no without being rude but even though he was not a beginners horse I always felt fine putting people on. See in my experience people always say that they can ride a horse but this horse was such a great test.

If someone who couldn't give strong clear aids, hold a good contact etc, he just wouldn't move. He was normally so sensitive to leg but a beginner could sit there and kick and wouldn't budge. Just stand there doing nothing. Maybe they could convince him to walk, at best a few strides of trot but that was only people who at least had some clue.

Was it good behaviour? Probably not, but he wasn't a beginners horse, he wouldn't be safe for beginners to ride outside of an arena. Its not something I could fix - I mean anyone with the skill to fix it would get on and he'd be an angel, but I didn't mind it. I think it was good, it stops a horse falling into wrong hands or getting someone in trouble. Horses test people for a reason I think, if you can't pass you shouldn't be riding that horse - you are simply not ready if you cannot enforce your aids.

Sorry, but your boyfriend sounds like a jerk. Tell him to keep to his horses and you can keep to yours. I wouldn't send a horse to a trainer because your boyfriend can't ride. I don't really think much of riders (at least the kind that talk themselves up) that cannot ride a range of horses.

Your horse works for you and that is all that matters.
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post #27 of 29 Old 09-18-2011, 04:26 PM
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Dresden

My wife and I have been married for 45 years and we have owned horses since 1975. But is has always been best if we didn't share a horse. That doesn't mean she can never ride my horse or vica versa. But we both look for different things in a horse. And what's more the horses always know that.

If you have a horse that is always trying to push its luck then that calls for a certain response from the rider and that is not always the whip.

What the horse will need is EITHER a master OR a mistress - take your pick. But gently tell your fella at home that your horse is your horse - if he wants one then there are plenty out there looking for a good home.

PS Is this the horse with the side pull?
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post #28 of 29 Old 09-18-2011, 04:45 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barry Godden View Post
Dresden

My wife and I have been married for 45 years and we have owned horses since 1975. But is has always been best if we didn't share a horse. That doesn't mean she can never ride my horse or vica versa. But we both look for different things in a horse. And what's more the horses always know that.

If you have a horse that is always trying to push its luck then that calls for a certain response from the rider and that is not always the whip.

What the horse will need is EITHER a master OR a mistress - take your pick. But gently tell your fella at home that your horse is your horse - if he wants one then there are plenty out there looking for a good home.

PS Is this the horse with the side pull?
Yes, that would be the same horse. I only have the one :) I am betting, from this experience, that not sharing a horse has helped that marriage last 45 years ;)

Thank you for the advice!
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post #29 of 29 Old 09-19-2011, 12:11 AM
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As stated though not bad behaviour its not great. It's what I'd call beginner pony vices. We have one very difficult to get moving to turn and to stop eating grass. It's a pain but he's as safe as houses.

Definitely send the boyfriend off for lessons. Buy him a voucher hand it to him.
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