Would you be hesitant to sell a horse to someone who hadn't ridden in a while?
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Talk

Would you be hesitant to sell a horse to someone who hadn't ridden in a while?

This is a discussion on Would you be hesitant to sell a horse to someone who hadn't ridden in a while? within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        07-03-2011, 06:10 PM
      #1
    Foal
    Would you be hesitant to sell a horse to someone who hadn't ridden in a while?

    Well I had a horse for a couple years, but then my parents sold him. That was almost 2 years ago, and I haven't been on a horse since. Would you be uncomfortable selling your horse to someone like me? (I guess it also depends on the horse in question; I'm not looking to buy a young or green horse or anything of the sort.) Thanks!
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        07-03-2011, 06:22 PM
      #2
    Green Broke
    It would entirely depend on the horse in question. Namely it's temprement, its history, it's quirks, it's competition history and current level.

    For example I have a schoolmaster at home, he is 100% bombproof and excellent for nervous riders however if you hang on his mouth he WILL object. If you jab him with a spur he will put you on the floor no questions asked. He is quirky to handle on the ground because he has been mistreated in the past. In his past he has been a top level show horse and he knows his job. I wouldnt sell him to a rider who hasnt ridden for a while or someone who hasnt handled horses in a while as it could all go very wrong, very quickly and it would damage the horse and my reputation.

    However I once had a little pony called paddy that I would have sold even to the very very ineperianced because although his schooling was not up to scratch he wouldnt ever dream of taking advantage.
         
        07-03-2011, 07:08 PM
      #3
    Started
    Not really. Your husbandry skills are a lot more important than your riding ability. As long as you know what you're doing and can take good care of the horse, I wouldn't have a problem with it.
         
        07-03-2011, 07:16 PM
      #4
    Yearling
    I agree with Faye, depends on the horse. And your past history, of course.
    Let's say you were a fair rider, ok with w/t/c, never galloped. I would be hesitant to sell you my 6 yr old gelding, but that is because he is a bit spooky.
    I would have no trouble selling you my older (21yr old) gelding, as he is generally quite safe.
    That is, IF you had the $200 million, which is the lowest price I would consider selling him for, ha ha.
         
        07-03-2011, 07:30 PM
      #5
    Cat
    Green Broke
    You've only been out of horses for 2 years? That's a drop in the bucket. There are many people right now who are coming back to horses after 10 or more years without them (usually kids, careers, life in general had gotten in the way for a bit) and they are still finding people willing to sell them horses.

    You have a step up from a pure beginner because you know how to take care of a horse and as long as you are not looking for a completely green or high-level competition horse, I think you will find most people willing to sell you one.
         
        07-03-2011, 08:58 PM
      #6
    Trained
    I would be more concerned about you going to a seller who just wants to sell you a horse regardless of it's a good fit for your skill level. Horses are a dime a dozen these days and finding the good ones can be tricky with so many people desperate to unload unwanted ones. If you do start to look, take someone with you who can help you flush out anything that may be dishonest. Two years off is nothing, although your leg muscles may disagree for the first few rides back.
         
        07-04-2011, 12:34 AM
      #7
    Banned
    If they were for sale, I wouldn't hesitate to sell either my 9 yr. Old Belgian or my 6 yr. Old OTTB to someone who hasn't ridden for a while.....because they are both calm and sane and very willing to please.

    So no, it wouldn't bother me if you'd been off riding for a couple of years....
         
        07-04-2011, 12:40 AM
      #8
    Foal
    Well the other thing is, I really don't know that much about horse care. My last (and only) horse was such an easy keeper. Other riders at the barn I boarded him at helped me learn the basics. But really, he was kept in the pasture and didn't need extra feed (although I gave him some grain after every ride), he didn't need shoes, he didn't have any vices, and he never got sick. So I don't have really any practice with those things. =/
         
        07-04-2011, 01:05 AM
      #9
    Banned
    Ok, well...i wouldn't sell you a TB then. Not that they are sickly or anything, but they do tend to be high maintenance...and most cannot hold weight as easily as a quarterhorse can. Most need some sort of specialized feeding regimen above and beyond the heartier breeds. They also tend to have emotional and health issues from their track days and/or breed tendencies. IN GENERAL, they tend to be susceptible to digestive problems such as low weight, ulcers and colic.....

    And most need retraining....which takes alot of time and devotion.....alot of dedication.

    If you are short on horse health and care knowledge....grab some books on horse health and care...and opt for the hearty breeds that are low maintenance.

    I'd still sell you my draft, hypothetically speaking. VERY low maintenance.....
         
        07-04-2011, 09:27 PM
      #10
    Cat
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by hillree    
    Well the other thing is, I really don't know that much about horse care. My last (and only) horse was such an easy keeper. Other riders at the barn I boarded him at helped me learn the basics. But really, he was kept in the pasture and didn't need extra feed (although I gave him some grain after every ride), he didn't need shoes, he didn't have any vices, and he never got sick. So I don't have really any practice with those things. =/

    Thing is - no matter if its 2 years or 2 days since you owned a horse, if it was an easy keeper that had no problems, you aren't ever fully prepared for a hard keeper until you have one. Its something that comes with experience. As for injuries - well that also comes with experience and time and the most important thing there is to have your vet's number on hand. Most sellers aren't going to hold that against you if in every other way you and the horse are a good match and you are willing to listen to their tips on that horse. They can tell you what feed and how much the horse is doing well on and everything like that.

    The other thing, if you are worried that someone is going to hold your time away from horses against you, you could always put off getting a horse and instead invest the money that would have gone into his care into riding lessons. This will get you back into horses under the guidance of a professional and some riding instructors will also give tips and information and equine care too if asked. Then when you feel ready for a horse the instructor can help find you a good match.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Horse Not Ridden In Year :/ JJackson Horse Riding 4 03-15-2011 01:55 AM
    How often does a young horse need to be ridden? secretmolly Horse Training 14 03-02-2011 07:39 PM
    Does your horse like to be ridden?? free_sprtd Horse Riding 24 02-09-2009 09:14 PM
    My horse I got hasn't been ridden in 9+ years... ? nolahcontend Horse Training 8 12-25-2008 01:47 AM
    My new horse is scared to be ridden. What do I do? sammycole0417 Horse Training 10 10-07-2008 09:48 AM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:53 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0