Wow, Really?
   

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Wow, Really?

This is a discussion on Wow, Really? within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • I cannot afford my retired horse
  • Can't afford to retire my horse

 
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    10-27-2011, 10:50 AM
  #1
Foal
Wow, Really?

There are quite a few nice girls at the barn I now board at but a couple of them can be really uncaring towards their horses. One of the girls retired her horse that she had for quite a few years because he's older and has arthritis(I believe) in his neck. He can't see were he is placing his feet and falls often. I found it sweet that she had kept the horse through it all, but then she tells me that she tried to SELL him.

The reason she retired him was because he went down hard once and she broke her arm. Just because she got hurt. They were trying to sell him to younger girls learning jumping/dressage. Now don't get me wrong, I've seen the pictures and that horse could jump. But I really think that that is so wrong to sell a horse that can't even be ridden properly. I would of felt fine about it if they were trying to sell him off as a pasture buddy.. It doesn't make much sense to me.

Ok, I'm done ranting now.
     
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    10-27-2011, 03:58 PM
  #2
Yearling
Although it would be ideal to keep a horse all the way through retirement, sometimes it just is not possible.

It kinda sounds like she retired him because she is too scared to use him. Arthritis will most likely prevent jumping, but it doesn't mean he can't be ridden. With proper care and a good owner, he could still do some light flat work, and possibly be a good lesson horse.

The tripping and falling thing is a good indicator that he probably can't jump anymore. I do not think she is wrong to try to sell him, as long as she is honest and upright about why she is selling him. If she can't use him and can't retire him well, then she should be able to sell him. Who knows, maybe someone will buy him as a light trail horse and pasture puff?

Personally, I buy horses with no intent to sell. My horse will retire and die in my pasture, hopefully as an old fart. But some people just do not do this. It doesn't make them terrible people, especially if they have a reason you may not know about.

Her motives may be purely altruistic, maybe she feels she cannot give him the proper care? Or that someone else could better use him. It is just impossible to know.
     
    10-27-2011, 04:19 PM
  #3
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lakotababii    
Although it would be ideal to keep a horse all the way through retirement, sometimes it just is not possible.

It kinda sounds like she retired him because she is too scared to use him. Arthritis will most likely prevent jumping, but it doesn't mean he can't be ridden. With proper care and a good owner, he could still do some light flat work, and possibly be a good lesson horse.

The tripping and falling thing is a good indicator that he probably can't jump anymore. I do not think she is wrong to try to sell him, as long as she is honest and upright about why she is selling him. If she can't use him and can't retire him well, then she should be able to sell him. Who knows, maybe someone will buy him as a light trail horse and pasture puff?

Personally, I buy horses with no intent to sell. My horse will retire and die in my pasture, hopefully as an old fart. But some people just do not do this. It doesn't make them terrible people, especially if they have a reason you may not know about.

Her motives may be purely altruistic, maybe she feels she cannot give him the proper care? Or that someone else could better use him. It is just impossible to know.

She keeps him at the retirement barn that my barn has, she's also leasing another horse. The first two people she had ride him they didn't tell about all that, she's honest about his age though. None of the girls stayed on him for more than a minute.

It just doesn't seem right.
     
    10-27-2011, 04:33 PM
  #4
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by LexiJumper    
She keeps him at the retirement barn that my barn has, she's also leasing another horse. The first two people she had ride him they didn't tell about all that, she's honest about his age though. None of the girls stayed on him for more than a minute.

It just doesn't seem right.

Hmm that it interesting. Hopefully someone will come along that can give him a good retirement home.
     
    10-27-2011, 04:42 PM
  #5
Teen Forum Moderator
It's expensive to keep a horse for luxury, and even more expensive to keep one that you can't/won't ride and a horse that you can ride. The fact that he probably has to have suppliments and such probably up the costs too.

No one has much spare money right now, so I don't really see how you can blame her for wanting to sell him. Sounds to me like he'd probably still be fine for light rides or as a companion horse. In fact, it may of even been a better thing for her to sell him to someone who has time for him, so I really don't see how she's at fault. Most older horses are prone to artheritis and tripping, so she really wasn't being dishonest.

Personally I would of just kept him until he can't be ridden any more because he's hurting...maybe three or four more years, then put him down. A horse with no purpose has no drive anyways.
     
    10-27-2011, 04:57 PM
  #6
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Endiku    

Personally I would of just kept him until he can't be ridden any more because he's hurting...maybe three or four more years, then put him down. A horse with no purpose has no drive anyways.

Really?

I would never put a horse down because they can't be ridden. I figure if, say, he is 25 when he can no longer be ridden (although I know they go a lot further than that) then he darn well deserves to live his last years doing whatever the heck he pleases in my pasture. He gave me at least 20 years of good hard work, so I will give him his last few to enjoy himself, and run as he pleases without being ridden.

Of course, if his pain cannot be managed you put them down, but arthritis is not unmanageable in most cases.

Honestly I think too many people throw animals away or put them down because they do not fit their "purposes". If you can afford to get another one, you can afford to retire your old one.
     
    10-27-2011, 05:46 PM
  #7
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Endiku    
It's expensive to keep a horse for luxury, and even more expensive to keep one that you can't/won't ride and a horse that you can ride. The fact that he probably has to have suppliments and such probably up the costs too.

No one has much spare money right now, so I don't really see how you can blame her for wanting to sell him. Sounds to me like he'd probably still be fine for light rides or as a companion horse. In fact, it may of even been a better thing for her to sell him to someone who has time for him, so I really don't see how she's at fault. Most older horses are prone to artheritis and tripping, so she really wasn't being dishonest.

Personally I would of just kept him until he can't be ridden any more because he's hurting...maybe three or four more years, then put him down. A horse with no purpose has no drive anyways.

What I'm saying is that he can't take a few steps without nearly face planting with somebody on his back. He would make a good companion horse I think, BUT she was trying to sell him as a horse for the buyer to learn to jump and do advanced dressage moves on.

He's still in good shape at 27 though. But he wouldn't be good for what she was selling him for.
     
    10-27-2011, 05:55 PM
  #8
Teen Forum Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lakotababii    
Really?

I would never put a horse down because they can't be ridden. I figure if, say, he is 25 when he can no longer be ridden (although I know they go a lot further than that) then he darn well deserves to live his last years doing whatever the heck he pleases in my pasture. He gave me at least 20 years of good hard work, so I will give him his last few to enjoy himself, and run as he pleases without being ridden.

Of course, if his pain cannot be managed you put them down, but arthritis is not unmanageable in most cases.

Honestly I think too many people throw animals away or put them down because they do not fit their "purposes". If you can afford to get another one, you can afford to retire your old one.
I'm not talking about competing, or even daily rides. I'm talking about capable of being tacked up and taken for a trail ride or something. Horses are happiest with something to look forewards to, and to keep their minds sharp. That's how our two mares Delriah (49) and Puddin' (going on 28) have made it this far. The exercise keeps them in great shape.

So yes. Really. I didn't say that I would put the animal down as soon as it developed artheritis, I said that I would put it down when it was no longer capable of being ridden without pain. Frequent trimming, a good diet, and exercise can all keep a horse with even moderate to severe artheritis healthy and able to go for a trail ride or do some arena work with no discomfort. Once it progresses to where the animal is tripping on it's own feet (not a sign of artheritis, but of nerve deterioration) and unable to feel where it's going, then it needs to be put down.

Artheritis can be doctored, nerves can't. It's sometimes painful for a horse to begin loosing feeling, and it can be very dangerous and scary. At that point there is no reason not to put it down.


OP- this is exactly what I'm talking about. Perhaps she is being 'unjust' or 'cruel' to her horse, but its not because she's trying to sell him. If he's nearly faceplanting every time he's ridden, he's dangerous to himself and his riders. In a pasture he could hurt himself, and in an arena he could hurt himself. This is one of those circumstances where I would think that putting him down is what is best.
     
    10-29-2011, 10:04 PM
  #9
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Endiku    
I'm not talking about competing, or even daily rides. I'm talking about capable of being tacked up and taken for a trail ride or something. Horses are happiest with something to look forewards to, and to keep their minds sharp. That's how our two mares Delriah (49) and Puddin' (going on 28) have made it this far. The exercise keeps them in great shape.

So yes. Really. I didn't say that I would put the animal down as soon as it developed artheritis, I said that I would put it down when it was no longer capable of being ridden without pain. Frequent trimming, a good diet, and exercise can all keep a horse with even moderate to severe artheritis healthy and able to go for a trail ride or do some arena work with no discomfort. Once it progresses to where the animal is tripping on it's own feet (not a sign of artheritis, but of nerve deterioration) and unable to feel where it's going, then it needs to be put down.

Artheritis can be doctored, nerves can't. It's sometimes painful for a horse to begin loosing feeling, and it can be very dangerous and scary. At that point there is no reason not to put it down.


OP- this is exactly what I'm talking about. Perhaps she is being 'unjust' or 'cruel' to her horse, but its not because she's trying to sell him. If he's nearly faceplanting every time he's ridden, he's dangerous to himself and his riders. In a pasture he could hurt himself, and in an arena he could hurt himself. This is one of those circumstances where I would think that putting him down is what is best.


Ohhhhhhhh... sorry misunderstood your original post. I agree, if they get to that point put them down.
     

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