Your Experience With Stallions? - Page 2
 
 

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Your Experience With Stallions?

This is a discussion on Your Experience With Stallions? within the Horse Talk forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

     
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        12-22-2006, 06:22 AM
      #11
    Weanling
    The only experience I have ever had with stallions is my friends 27" miniature. This little mini is the most adorable little thing I have ever seen. He is a full grown 27" black and white pinto stallion. Loves the ladies, especially the tall ones lol. Loved my friends 14hh pony :)

    He has the best nature. He comes up for cuddles, licks you, he's like a big puppy more than a pony. Gorgeous little thing.
         
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        12-24-2006, 02:30 PM
      #12
    Foal
    Over 60 some years I have had stud horses and stud jacks. Both my own and ones I was breaking for other people. Keep in mind, a studs main perpose in life is a breeder. No mater how sweet and gentle you may find them 364 days out of the year that one odd day when the wind is right they will revert to their natural instincts. Precautoins must be taken when working them or haveing them around mixed stock. It not only applies to cattle but also horses that even a gelding that has been in the close company of a mare in heat and picks up the smell the stud figures free game and will try either to mount them or in a jealous rage take them out. When I was showing studs the first thing I did when unloading them was to fill their nose with vicks to ruin any smells that were prevelant at the arena or wherever. This is not to say that studs cannot be worked by themselves verry efficiently. I've used them for cutting, ropeing, and several other purposes that did not require them to be in mixed company. Studs DO NOT belonge on trail rides and other gatherings where there is a number of horses. Just one old mans opinion who has been there and done that!
         
        03-02-2007, 10:13 AM
      #13
    Foal
    I've only had 2 experienmces with Stallions, both of which were TB stallions, so I got dragged along the stones going down to the field and one tried killing me whilst I was attempting join up. Not very pleasent.
         
        03-02-2007, 11:58 AM
      #14
    Foal
    I don't have time to read all of these replies here, so I hope I'm not repeating anyone, nor going against anyone's opinions, I'm just writing about my own experiences and knowledge on the stallions and what I believe to be true. ...

    I find that when a stallion is treated right away as a possible problem child, he turns into one. I believe that many people just assume that the stallion will become difficult, harder to control, and in such belief, tend to train him with that underlying tone that tells him he is different from the other horses. (Which he is, but this tends to make people single him out.) I have seen barns in which the stallion is usually kept at the far end of the barn in a darker stall than others, he is not allowed the same turn outs as the others, and he is almost treated as if he's a wild animal instead of the beautiful companion he could be. I totally believe that if a stallion is treated under such beliefs, then that is exactly what he will become.
    Regardless of the urges to breed, dominate, and fight other stallions, he should still be treated as the other horses in his barn....do we think he doesn't notice the difference?? If a stallion is treated in a respectful manner, (with you knowing full well that he needs a firmer hand, more understanding, and possibly more patince)...if he is given the same rights and freedoms as the other horses in the barn AND it is understood that he is just as much a social animal as a gelding and needs to "feel like a horse", then I beleive a stallion can grow into a very respectful gentleman.
    I am not saying that such beliefs go without due respect, an ill handled and ill trained stallion can surely become a dangerous animal, but so will one who believes his life is treated unfairly.
    I just find it to be of no surprise when I walk into a barn and the owner says "stay away from the stallion in the back.." Well, perhaps what he needs is less people ignoring him, and more people to have approached him in his life and a lot more of a chance to socialize, and not have a stall in the back somewhere.

    That is my opinion on raising stallions in a nut shell....I could go on, but I think you get what I mean.
         
        03-02-2007, 06:13 PM
      #15
    Foal
    LOl Skippy this is a case of the good, the bad, and the ugly. Like you I've had stud horses you could ride up to a mare in season, pull the saddle and breed the mare, saddle up and ride off. I've also had them so rank you didn't go in the pen without a whip in your hand. Jacks are even worse then stud horses. The best training they can get is when they are young let them run with a bunch of geldings and mares. They will be taught right quick where their place is. That being said. Is this colts line a proven line. Have his sire and dam been shown and proven they have bloodlines worth carrying on. If not, and I know this may sound rash, but you may be bringing more hoses into this world to make the meat buyers happy. There is a problem in this country right now with to many grade horses that are being culled. I realize you can't ride the papers and it is sad that so many are going to meat buyers but it seems like if they are not proven blood lines they end up as a pasture ornament untill finnaly they end up in a sale and some meat buyer picks them up for .06 cents a lb. Make a good saddle horse out of him and have him gelded. Good luck.
         
        03-03-2007, 10:36 PM
      #16
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Desert Rat
    The best training they can get is when they are young let them run with a bunch of geldings and mares. They will be taught right quick where their place is.
    Can't say I agree with everything everyone has said, but I do emphasize this. Having a dominant mare or gelding has worked wonders when dealing with respect issues from other horses. It was so effortless and easy, too. Turn them out and they learn the pecking order.
         
        03-04-2007, 11:57 PM
      #17
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by kristy
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Desert Rat
    The best training they can get is when they are young let them run with a bunch of geldings and mares. They will be taught right quick where their place is.
    Can't say I agree with everything everyone has said, but I do emphasize this. Having a dominant mare or gelding has worked wonders when dealing with respect issues from other horses. It was so effortless and easy, too. Turn them out and they learn the pecking order.
    THse are both very true, I know a lady and her colts ALL run with geldings and mares- this generally means they are better behaved in all different circumstances.
         

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