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Distance hauling - Illinois to Florida

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  • +suggested+rested+every+hours++hauling+horses+cross+country
  • Hauling horse long distance

 
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    05-05-2013, 09:22 PM
  #11
Started
When you get to the N side of Atlanta, you can jump on 285 and go around town on the W side and bypass the 75/85 mess. It adds an extra 15 miles but should save you a good 1/2 hour. (at least it did 20 years ago and it has to be even worse now)
     
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    05-07-2013, 06:58 PM
  #12
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDGx    
How often do you stop and actually unload your horses before proceeding ?
First off, Do Not Unload Your Horse At Any Stop. If something happens, your horse could run off, spook and hurt someone, not load up again, etc. Anything can happen and the best thing is to just open a window so the horse can stick his head out. That's as far as you should go. Don't open the back and get in, just open a window.
I found an article in a magazine about hauling horses for long drives.

I got this from the EQUUS horse magazine.
I am just going to write everything in the magazine on here so nothing is left out and it's not confusing. This is what is says:

EQUUS
Long Hauls Don't Tire Horses.
A new Texas A&M University study challenges popular notions about how many rest stops horses need during cross-country transport.
"There is a school of thought that says you need to stop every eight hours or so to let the horses rest." says Ted Friend, PhD, of Texas A&M University. "Our goal was to scientifically document when transported horses begin to show fatigue and what length of rest periods are needed for adequate rest."
Friend's research team divided a group of horses into three compartments in a semi-tractor trailer for a 16 to 18 hour trip. The low-density section held five to seven horses, the medium-density area contained eight to 10 horses and the high-density enclosure held 11 to 13 horses.
After every eight hours of travel, the horses were rested for one hour on the truck. They were also rested for an hour prior to unloading at their destination. Select groups of horses were watered using on-board troughs during rest stops. The activity of the horses throughout the trip was recorded for later analysis.
"We were primarily interested in what the horses did during rest stops," says Friend. "Truckers had told us that if you stopped periodically, the horses would be calm for about 20 minutes - in what they assumed was a resting time - then become agitated and move around."
However, videotapes revealed that the horses seemed to take no rest during the stops. "In the groups that were watered, we saw an increase of activity in the first few minutes of a stop as they positioned themselves to get water," says Friend. " The medium and low-density groups showed a tendency to become slightly more agitated toward the end of the hour long stop - They basically started picking on each other more - but we did not see anything that could be identified as resting in any of the groups, and none of the horses appeared to be particularly tired."
In a yet-to-bo-published follow-up study, videotapes of horses given three 90-minute rest stops during a 24-hour trip revealed similar behavior.
"These findings suggest that we might be better off just pushing through on longer trips and getting to the destination," says Friend. "Of course, you don't want to drive when you are tired yourself, but the notion that you have to stop every eight hours for the sake of their health hasn't been proven and might even be counterproductive. If the environment they are unloaded in is unfamiliar, they may end up getting less rest than they would if you just left them on the trailer." Reference: "Activity of unrestrained horses during on-truck stops," Journal of Equine Veterinary Science.


That is what the article says. Right from the magazine. Of EQUUS.
     

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