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First Trailer Experiences?

This is a discussion on First Trailer Experiences? within the Horse Trailers forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category
  • Logan horse trailer forum
  • Thuro bilt trailer complaint

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    05-13-2012, 05:54 PM
  #11
Trained
Even if a horse is trained to load and is a saint, they can still be spooked. Horses are always unpredictable. Escape or access doors, they both serve a purpose.
     
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    05-13-2012, 05:59 PM
  #12
Yearling
Oh yea my mom opens it so I can push out if they deside to jump in and not walk which has happened a few times. Mines a CM extra tall and wide so I could get by if I wanted but id rather jump through the door. Its safer.
     
    05-13-2012, 07:17 PM
  #13
Green Broke
I am like PaintHorseMares I like a stock or stock combo trailer.

You can haul just about anything in them! We traded in our stock trailer for a Logan 3 horse GN. Its a beautiful trailer but I took the dividers out and I wouldn't feel right about hauling steers in it. So I am in the process right now of trading it in for a new CM 24ft. Brushbuster with a tackroom. My horses hate the dividers and even in the winter I leave the windows down(not the grates). So what's the point? LOL. Plus they leave slobber and boogers on the sides of it. The Logan is harder to keep clean and if you don't have a pole barn or something to keep them under the vinyl graphics on the sides peel and crack.

Aluminum is spendy but it seems to corresponde with the higher resale value. And if they get dull you can take them to a truck wash and have them do an acid wash that will get rid of the oxidation and grime, makes it look like new. I am not a fan of aluminum they seem to fall apart if used hard and if you haul it empty remember to keep all your gates and dividers latched or tied so they don't weaken and sag. We had an aluminum ranch trailer that rattled apart and crippled 4 bulls when the back door latch broke. The bulls somersaulted out the trailer onto a dirt road at 40mph. Good bulls aren't cheap and they don't do you any good crippled. Also I don't know if this applies to horses but if cows are cut on aluminum they can die, we call it aluminum poisoning. So make sure there are no sharp edges or wear and tear inside that could harm your horse if you go to buy a used one. But for most that just haul down the pavement to shows and lessons they are just dandy and might save some fuel money with a lighter trailer. Also if it is an aluminum skinned trailer on a steel frame, check that. There is a reaction between steel and aluminum and it can deteriorate.

I agree with mentioned earlier about getting a bigger trailer than you think you need. I haul 4 horses in a 3 horse..lol still plenty of room because the dividers are out but you get the point.
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    05-13-2012, 08:45 PM
  #14
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by churumbeque    
This is very true, all of this post. They are more of an access door. I never had to go in and lead a horse in. If anything when I had a horse that had never been hauled to load I ran a lunge line from horse to front of the trailer and back to lead the horse in so you never have to be in the trailer. As the horse moved forward I take up the slack. Sometimes I ran a line behind the horse to encourage them in. I would be in the rear to be able to put up the butt bar and close the door. Then go up front and secure the horse. I would do this with the escapre door shut so the horse didn't try and go out the door.
That's a really smart idea. Yeah I never understood what people did to load their horses inside of a straight load. I bet it can get really interesting and probably much easier without the dividers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PaintHorseMares    
I prefer the combo/stock trailers with removeable dividers/chest/butt bars....roomier, good ventilation, etc. Even in the winter, they are protected from most of the wind and our mares don't mind (they are out in the weather 24x7 anyway). Also, you can use a stock trailer to haul anything...we've hauled hay, furniture, lumber, etc. rather than needing a utility trailer also.
I prefer aluminum since they are much lighter and don't rust but we settled on steel since there is a big difference in the price.
Yeah that's very true, I will definitely keep that in mind.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SorrelHorse    
Even if a horse is trained to load and is a saint, they can still be spooked. Horses are always unpredictable. Escape or access doors, they both serve a purpose.
Very true

Quote:
Originally Posted by COWCHICK77    
I am like PaintHorseMares I like a stock or stock combo trailer.

You can haul just about anything in them! We traded in our stock trailer for a Logan 3 horse GN. Its a beautiful trailer but I took the dividers out and I wouldn't feel right about hauling steers in it. So I am in the process right now of trading it in for a new CM 24ft. Brushbuster with a tackroom. My horses hate the dividers and even in the winter I leave the windows down(not the grates). So what's the point? LOL. Plus they leave slobber and boogers on the sides of it. The Logan is harder to keep clean and if you don't have a pole barn or something to keep them under the vinyl graphics on the sides peel and crack.

Aluminum is spendy but it seems to corresponde with the higher resale value. And if they get dull you can take them to a truck wash and have them do an acid wash that will get rid of the oxidation and grime, makes it look like new. I am not a fan of aluminum they seem to fall apart if used hard and if you haul it empty remember to keep all your gates and dividers latched or tied so they don't weaken and sag. We had an aluminum ranch trailer that rattled apart and crippled 4 bulls when the back door latch broke. The bulls somersaulted out the trailer onto a dirt road at 40mph. Good bulls aren't cheap and they don't do you any good crippled. Also I don't know if this applies to horses but if cows are cut on aluminum they can die, we call it aluminum poisoning. So make sure there are no sharp edges or wear and tear inside that could harm your horse if you go to buy a used one. But for most that just haul down the pavement to shows and lessons they are just dandy and might save some fuel money with a lighter trailer. Also if it is an aluminum skinned trailer on a steel frame, check that. There is a reaction between steel and aluminum and it can deteriorate.

I agree with mentioned earlier about getting a bigger trailer than you think you need. I haul 4 horses in a 3 horse..lol still plenty of room because the dividers are out but you get the point.
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Ack.. poor bulls. Yeah everything has a chance of breaking down unfortunately but I do like the idea of no dividers and definitely will get one that holds more horses than I have :) Thanks
     
    05-14-2012, 04:08 AM
  #15
Weanling
See inline!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel    
Alright guys, I have a trailer on my wish list. I know nothing about trailers, nor about buying them. Honestly if there were a "trailer buying and specs for dummies" book, that would be the book for me!

I have a tall horse, he's 17hh at the withers so I'm guessing at least a 7 ft tall trailer ceiling? I think I want a slant load, because the straight loads look very hard to unload horses out of (what's with the half doors on the side?

My Swedish Warmblood mare is 16.3 and WIDE. I just bought a new trailer and looked at several, variations. For a 17 hh horse I wouldn't go with anything shorter than 7 1/2 feet. I got a 7 foot tall and that's only because she's not a head tosser but for a 17hh horse, 7.5 tall is the shortest I would get, one head toss on anything shorter you are asking for trouble.

I also rather have a gooseneck but since I don't have a truck at the moment (in my future also!) probably it's going to be a bumper pull.
I'm with you on this, I decided to go with a BP JUST because in case something breaks or goes wrong, its easier to find a truck that can pull a BP rather than a GN.

So what did you look for when you first bought your trailer?
I just bought my first trailer maybe 2 1/2 weeks ago.
  • At first price was my biggest concern. I was just going find the nicest one in my price range. I ended up getting a loan which made my price range better.
  • Trailer weight; safety is my number 1 concern and pulling is never the problem its the stopping, that is hard on the truck. So I took the Gross Combined Weight Rating and did the math, between the trailer and my giant mare (1600 lbs @ the hieght of her pregnancy) and added another 1600 lbs for another 1200 lbs WB, plus 400lbs tack, filled water tank and hay. And I MADE SURE there was no less than 2,000 lbs of wiggle room.
  • After that, with a BIG WB mare with a baby by her side, I needed something equally as big, but NOT a straight load.
  • Sealed/fully enclosed trailer, not a stock trailer as I have a couple out of town shows and clinics where I might need to camp in my trailer and it's 1000% worse when there's rain coming through the slits, or trying to keep the heat in or bugs out. An enclosed trailer with windows &/or screens helps a lot.
  • Seperate tack room that is also sealed/enclosed.
  • Interior and exterior lights, nothing worse than loading or unloading in the dark.
What are the important things/ must haves for a trailer?
See above

Does the trailer material/age/design matter?
Yes. Aluminum is much lighter weight that steel. Theres a difference between Aluminum framed or skinned between a fully aluminum trailer and theres a price difference between them. The older the trailer the more you will need to more carefully inspect things like the quality and shelf life of the floor, wiring, last time bearings we repacked.

Older trailers, are usually not as well areodynamically (sp?) designed and this will affect your mileage.

Any other information you can provide. This thread isn't just for me, but for everyone that is looking to buy a trailer and has no clue.
There is a certain price point where it's better to buy a base model NEW trailer like a Thuro-bilt trailer, rather than buying a more expensive older trailer, and quiet frankly I personally would rather have something with less features but brand new, without rust or damage from a previous horse.

I can make a trailer nicer afterwards, sealing stock trailer with plexiglass, or insulating and sealing the tack room or buying an after market water tank in a new base model, but I can only sand down rusted areas so much and then eventually you're putting new tires $500-$1000 on a dual axel trailer, painting $300-$500, rewiring or replacing the floor and mats $200-400-$700, to where its economically logical to just guy a new one.


Thanks!
     
    05-14-2012, 07:20 AM
  #16
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigGirlsRideWarmbloods    
See inline!
Wow!! Thank you for all the amazing information! 7.5 feet.. gotcha! Yeah he's a big big boy haha!

I will definitely double check with the HF before purchasing but this won't be for some time :)

Thank you so much, everyone has been so enlightening!
     
    05-18-2012, 04:30 PM
  #17
Weanling
My first trailer was a cute little older Kieffer Built ('91). I bought it in 2006, so was leery about the age at first, but my dad went with to purchase and we bought it from the original dealer who had sold it in '91, it had had the same owner the whole time who came back annually to have the bearings re-packed and electrical checked, etc. Before I got it they had re-done the floor and put brand new mats in it.

It was a 2 horse slant load bumper pull, it was steel with a fiberglass roof, and although it was a slant with dividers, it was built like a stock trailer with the open slat windows (I had fiberglass inserts for winter). It had a very small tack room, which was my main complaint about it, the tack room had a stallion wall between the horses in it, but not a solid wall, so the hay and shavings from the horse area would blow forward onto my tack, which would not be a huge deal if I wasn't so dang allergic to hay!

It was 7' tall and was roomy enough for my 15.3hh claustrophobic mare, and we hauled a friend's Clydesdale cross in there all the time, and several times hauled a friend's 17hh TB mare with no problem at all.

I bought it for $3800 and sold it for $3500 6 years later, can't really beat that :) I got a new trailer because I wanted something roomier, with a bigger tack room, I got a warmblood sized Titan Avalanche III with a ramp and the swing out saddle rack/blanket bars. I LOVE it, it's so roomy and while it's a bit wider than the Kieffer, it is actually easier to park and drive because it's much steadier on the road, it weighs less too because of the galvanized steel rather than the heavy stuff.
Skyseternalangel likes this.
     
    05-19-2012, 11:54 PM
  #18
Weanling
Make sure you take someone who knows about horse trailers with you. I have experience with trailers, but I already told my dad he is coming when I buy my first trailer in a couple months. I helped redo floors and body work on trailers and can rewire an whole trailer by my self. I do most of our trailer repairs.

We used a bumper pull stock trailer. It's extra tall and extra heavy, a lot of trucks can't handle it plus 3 horses. We also do lots of camping trips, so the open space in side can turn into feed food, we can haul any size of horse, up to about 18 hands tall. It's a 4 horse trailer, but normally only haul 3 horses.

Now, since I'm 19, have my own truck and want to show more I'm getting a smaller trailer. My truck can't handle my Dad's trailer and really his truck can't either. I'm looking at getting me a straight load 2 horse bumper pull. This will be my first trailer, I'm an college student by need something I can haul easy if I ever need to haul more than 2 horses have my dad's trailer. My little truck can handle an two horse once I pull electric brakes on it, plus I can borrow a truck that can handle it better. The thing is since I'm very knowledge able in repairing trailers, plus have my dad their to help I'm getting something that needs fix up, if I can get it cheap. I'm willing to replace wires, and the floor. The frame is what I'm really looking at being in good shape. Also make sure I have a window that opens in the front and escape doors. I will be adding electric brakes to truck and trailer. I will be hauling two barrel horses or two trail horses.

With you not having no experience, I would make sure to take someone who knows about horse trailers, get the truck you will pull with first that to know your limits. Make sure all the light wires are good, the floor and frame. I will check tires too. I also agree getting one horse bigger than you need. Another good reason is you can always haul hay in the empty stall, instead of getting all gear covered in hay. You will find a way to tie it where it would move and your horse can't reach.
     
    05-20-2012, 12:14 AM
  #19
Trained
I'd say start with any trailer that fits your horse and is safe. After awhile of loading your horse, hauling it, using it, you will know want you like and don't like, what your horse likes & doesn't like and your next purchase should be the best one.
themacpack likes this.
     
    05-20-2012, 01:21 AM
  #20
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spotted Image    
With you not having no experience, I would make sure to take someone who knows about horse trailers, get the truck you will pull with first that to know your limits. Make sure all the light wires are good, the floor and frame. I will check tires too. I also agree getting one horse bigger than you need. Another good reason is you can always haul hay in the empty stall, instead of getting all gear covered in hay. You will find a way to tie it where it would move and your horse can't reach.
I definitely will!! I wish I had my own truck.. I'm the same age as you

That's also a great point, I didn't think of hauling hay in the trailer either.. that would be awesome for the future, thanks for all the great tips!

Quote:
Originally Posted by waresbear    
I'd say start with any trailer that fits your horse and is safe. After awhile of loading your horse, hauling it, using it, you will know want you like and don't like, what your horse likes & doesn't like and your next purchase should be the best one.
That is a good point. I've been in other people's trucks when they've hauled so I have an idea of how it feels but being in the driver's seat will be a lot different. I do know I don't feel comfortable with straight loads. I just don't know what to do with myself to get the horse in if they're having trouble whereas slant is much easier to tie them safely, and then slide the divider closed.

But yeah I'll definitely bring a knowledgeable friend with for both truck AND trailer purchases since I'm new to both.

Thanks everyone!
     

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