Tow weight limits & Goosenecks
   

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Tow weight limits & Goosenecks

This is a discussion on Tow weight limits & Goosenecks within the Horse Trailers forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category
  • Can tow 4 tonne
  • Max gooseneck weight on 02 silverado

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  • 1 Post By Joe4d
  • 1 Post By Darrin

 
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    04-16-2012, 02:19 PM
  #1
Weanling
Tow weight limits & Goosenecks

Hello!
So like I mentioned in a previous post the horse van didn't work out so I have to go with a trailer.

I have a 1985 Chevy Silverado C20 3/4 ton truck and it runs likes a dream. I've been pulling small, rented and borrowed bumper pull horse trailers, without a problem. I've decided to purchase my own horse trailer, but I'm confused by limits and ratings and weights.

I've read that goosenecks can pull more than bumper pulls.
I've read articles that say the GVWR is how much the truck can pull, but then I've read other articles that say you need to weight your truck on a scale and subtract that from the GVWR and that is the total amount you can pull.

(Which doesn't make a lot of sense to me, as when doing the math this weekend, the trailer weight of the trailer I've been using (2700 lbs) + my the weight of my horse 1500 + me, tack and feed for 3 days, is WAAY over the GVWR if you were to include the weight of the truck too, and the truck doesn't strain when pulling or have problems breaking/stoping.)

And then I just read a forum posting that said that, the rule about subtracting your truck weight from the posted GVWR weight went in to affect in the late 80's after new laws went in place, BUT I can't find 25 year old articles talking about this.

I had a new brake controler and new wiring put in last summer for the bumper pull towing, but I'm considering installing a B&W Turnover Gooseneck hitch for the bed.

I've read that by having a gooseneck you can pull more but how much, and is this even true?

According to the placard in the door the GVWR is 8600, GAWR FRONT 3800 & GAWR REAR 6000

But then next to that it says "For an improved ride with MAX of 3 passengers + 200 lbs of cargo its:
GVWR is 7200, GAWR FRONT 3800 GAWR REAR 4410

How much can I tow, and does that number change if I get a gooseneck?
Thank you very much for your help in advance!
     
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    04-16-2012, 02:53 PM
  #2
Green Broke
Stop reading articles and making this way more complicated than it is. Every single truck manufacturer publishes a towing guide, look up that towing guide for your specific vehicle and it will tell you exactly what it can tow conventional and goose/fifth wheel. Don't worry about all the gvs gr.s gwwwcs.
Do you look at any of that to see how many people you can carry ? While techincally it matters, in practice it doesnt. Just look at the OEM tow guide and stay below those numbers, the more below the better. GVWR is about suspension weight, not towing capacity. Other than the actual weight on the hitch.
Corporal likes this.
     
    04-16-2012, 03:32 PM
  #3
Green Broke
Your GAWR is how much each axle of your pickup is rated for and not suppose to be exceeded.

GCVW is the combined weight of trailer and pickup, generally for a 3/4 and 1 tons it is not to exceed 20,000#. People over load them all the time though and at least in my state we are not required to pull into weigh stations. I believe quite a few states do require this. Then you get into Joe's table of what your vehicle is rated to tow which can be less then the 20,000# for your 3/4 ton.

Trailers mostly carry a lot of their own weight on their own axles which also have a rating which can be found on the plaque mounted to it. Careful here as a lot of trailers have axles that are not heavy duty enough. I prefer axles that can carry more then how many horses it is rated to carry, tack and weight of trailer. Many of them can't when you look at their axle ratings. As an example, I have a 3 horse trailer that weights 2500# empyt. Put in 3 horses at ~1200 + tack/gear at ~300# and a 30 gallon water tank for 240# which puts my over all weight at ~6700#. My axles are rated to carry 3750#/each or 7500#. At the same time I bought mine there were 3 horse slant loads on the lot that were rated as low as 5000# and as high as my 7500#. That's why you need to be careful.

Trailers do put some of it's weight on the pickup. Bumper pulls but it all on the rear axle unless you use an equalizer hitch. Goose necks will put weight on both axles so distributes it's weight better. This is why you can haul more in a goose neck.
     
    04-16-2012, 03:39 PM
  #4
Weanling
The only tow Guide I could find from Chevy & GM was very generic:
http://www.gmfleet.com/pdf/trailering.pdf

And says:
Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) is the maximum number of
Pounds a tow vehicle may weigh. Everything that contributes to the
Weight of the tow vehicle is calculated in this rating, including the weight
Of the vehicle, driver and all passengers, fuel, payload, trailer tongue
Weight, hitch weight and all optional equipment. The GVWR is displayed
On the driverís door or door-lock pillar label of your vehicle.


I even went so far as to contacting the publishing house for ordering original repair manuals but they don't have a specific tow guides. Mostly wiring diagrams and engine schematics.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe4d    
stop reading articles and making this way more complicated than it is. Every single truck manufacturer publishes a towing guide, look up that towing guide for your specific vehicle and it will tell you exactly what it can tow conventional and goose/fifth wheel. Don't worry about all the gvs gr.s gwwwcs.
Do you look at any of that to see how many people you can carry ? While techincally it matters, in practice it doesnt. Just look at the OEM tow guide and stay below those numbers, the more below the better. GVWR is about suspension weight, not towing capacity. Other than the actual weight on the hitch.
     
    04-16-2012, 05:36 PM
  #5
Green Broke
Your axles are rated for 7,200# and 3,800# for a GVWR of 11,000#. Unfortunately your actual tow rating depends on exactly how your vehicle is equiped but with your axles I'm willing to bet it is 9,000# tow rating for a total of vehicle and trailer weight (GCVW) maximum of 20,000#.
     
    04-16-2012, 09:03 PM
  #6
Green Broke
I'd ask your insurance agent how much you can tow and still be covered.
     
    04-16-2012, 11:42 PM
  #7
Weanling
For what its worth, my girlfriend's truck is an F250, similar construction to yours, rated for 18K#.
My F350 is rated for 21K#, but I am limited to 18K as well, due to USDOT regs.
If I scale over 26K, I am required by law to have a CDL, because my truck has commercial signage as well as being owned by a business. Makes things a little fuzzy, but that's what the DMV told me.
A 2000# trailer plus a 1000# horse, gear, etc, on a 3/4 ton is a walk in the park.
I would, however, be concerned with tongue weight. Load it too much forward, and you'll have problems.
Load it too far back, and you'll get wag, which can be lethal.
I have both gooseneck and bumper pull hitches on my truck.
I use the goose whenever I can, as I find it easier to maneuver in tight quarters, and it tends to ride better in general, with the bulk of the weight distributed onto the rear axle makes for a smooth ride.
     

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