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Trailering a long distance?

This is a discussion on Trailering a long distance? within the Horse Trailers forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category
  • Horse won't eat trailering long distance
  • Horses liarage

 
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    01-19-2011, 07:38 AM
  #11
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by churumbeque    
lock n load and head down the road. 8 hrs is not a big deal unless you have a cheap trailer that does not ride well. Stop midway while you eat and let them rest with hay and water
I agree.
You will probably stop more than that, to refuel and use the restroom. Those breaks will be breaks for the horses too.

Unloading at rests is a tricky thing. For an 8 hour trip it is probably not worth the risk involved.

Be sure to bring water from home so when you do offer water you have the best chance that they will drink it.

Pack extra hay and water just in case there is some delay or emergency.

And most certainly make sure you have all your necessary paper work with you. Vehicle and horse paper work.

Quote:
Originally Posted by franknbeans    
I do not trailer a lot either, and understand your anxiety. I basically do it twice a year, to take my horses to my summer home, and back in the winter. Makes me more comfortable if I have company.....just an extra person to help in case there IS an issue, and I got the US rider policy that makes me feel MUCH better. Always get the trailer and truck checked just before I go-I am slightly paranoid, I guess.
I agree with this advice too. Be sure to get your trailer inspected before you head out. Getting stuck on the side of the road is no fun with a horse in the trailer.

Frank, I think Wyoming's point is that an 8 hour ride is not a big deal in the grand scheme of trucking a horse some where, that the horse will be fine. Not that it is not a big deal in general and that it should not be planned for, etc.
     
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    01-19-2011, 08:51 AM
  #12
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alwaysbehind    
I agree.
Frank, I think Wyoming's point is that an 8 hour ride is not a big deal in the grand scheme of trucking a horse some where, that the horse will be fine. Not that it is not a big deal in general and that it should not be planned for, etc.
In the UK 8 hours is the MAX that you can transport a horse without an overnight stop. The law dictates that you must unload the horses in a suitable liarage and leave them to rest for 12 hours!
     
    01-19-2011, 08:55 AM
  #13
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by hillree    
Thanks for the advice. Should I wrap her legs? Unload her when we rest? Have a vet check her over when we get home?
I never unload. To many possibilities for something to go wrong. No need to have a vet check unless she isn't acting right. I don't wrap legs but I used to years ago so either way. I also don't keep continuous hay in front of them because it makes them thirsty and they usually won't drink when traveling. I make sure they have a full belly before leaving for the trip
     
    01-19-2011, 12:00 PM
  #14
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by franknbeans    
Wn-perhaps to you it is nothing.....all of us don't share that sentiment.
What I meant is that the horse will be fine for that length of time. Sorry I did not clarify more for you. I am going to pick up a new horse and he will be on the trailer that long. We will both be alright traveling that distance.
     
    01-20-2011, 01:48 PM
  #15
Yearling
Your most important piece of paperwork to have with you is a negative Coggins report from your Vet. If in the event your stopped and don't have a negative Coggins your horse or horses can be impounded. The most distance we have travelled with horses on board is 4 hours. Which proved no problem at all. I know people who haul horses and mules from here in SW MO all the way to Colorado for Elk hunting and drive straight through with no watering or unloading until they reach their destination. The same for the return trip. I personally would offer water and plenty of hay.
     
    01-20-2011, 02:51 PM
  #16
Banned
If you are crossing any state lines you are probably required to have a health certificate too. Or maybe a brand inspection. Check what is required where you are traveling.
     
    01-20-2011, 03:33 PM
  #17
Green Broke
I read that you should let your horse put his head down for a while to drain the fluids from the lungs when you do stop for a rest.
     
    01-20-2011, 06:53 PM
  #18
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray MacDonald    
I read that you should let your horse put his head down for a while to drain the fluids from the lungs when you do stop for a rest.
That's true Ray. Our trailer is completely open so they can put their head down and clear the nasal/respiratory tract. If you have a trailer with a manger in the front, make sure they have a chance to back up, put their head down and blow their nose
The front of my trailer is a testament to this fact. The area in front of their heads is always covered with green snot.
This is really only a problem if your trailer is too small for your horse or if you tie their head too high. Personally, we don't tie at all when trailering.
     
    01-21-2011, 02:43 PM
  #19
Green Broke
Ahahaha! That's kind of gross! I heard some people don't tie and some do. I remember hearing an trailering accident and they couldn't get their horses out because they were tied. But it is just personal preference.
     
    01-27-2011, 10:23 PM
  #20
Weanling
We hauled two from upstate NY to scentral KS a year and a half ago. Talk about a learning experience. We took three days to do it, should have done it in two. We utilized two different horse hotels along the way, and that was a great idea. However you're not talking far enough for that.

I won't unload during the day, they're ok on the trailer. I WILL attempt to water them once during the day, and start the day, or midday, give a hay net with several flakes. Not a log, but enough to keep them happy for a bit.

I do much prefer to keep them untied whenever possible. However, there are times that's just not possible. Wife also polowrapped their legs. It's not a bad idea, however if my trailer was ten years newer I would NOT bother with it at all... much is just preference.
     

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