Are you in 4-WD when hauling? - Page 2
 
 

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Are you in 4-WD when hauling?

This is a discussion on Are you in 4-WD when hauling? within the Horse Trailers forums, part of the Barns, Boarding, and Farms category

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        02-10-2013, 10:19 PM
      #11
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CLaPorte432    
    We have a tow package on our truck. And we have this automatic brake system installed into our truck that slows the trailer down when going down hills and when we brake. So the trailer has its own set of brakes. Works really well.

    I've never hauled a trailer in 4WD unless the roads are bad. And if that's the case, I stay off of them
    Posted via Mobile Device
    Are you talking about your trailer having electric brakes and your truck having a brake controller?

    Does beling lack this? If you do, you should not be towing.
         
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        02-11-2013, 06:05 AM
      #12
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Delfina    
    That's good to know!

    Now I haul very, very, very infrequently but live on dirt/gravel roads. Would it be ok to engage the 4WD without towing for that purpose?
    Yes, absolutely. Think of it like anything else....use it or lose it.....

    No need to drive many miles in 4x4, but hey, lock it in every few days or once a week and let it turn for a mile or so.....that way, when you really need it, you'll know it works....

    I don't live on a gravel road, but you can bet when I do get on one I lock mine in. I use it most weekends when pulling on forest service roads but with winter and the short days I haven't used mine in a couple of months....mine needs to be ran some, thanks for reminding me!
         
        02-12-2013, 03:25 PM
      #13
    Weanling
    Thanks so much for the replies!

    We've already burned out one set of brakes through sheer ignorance. We have a Ford 150, and NOW we have the electric brakes for the trailer with controller. Our route isn't long, but in a couple of cases, it involves several miles of steep, windy roads, all downhill. (No ice or snow, ever!)

    And during a recent trip, by the time we got home, I could smell that distinctive brakes-not-happy odor. Had them checked, they were fine, but I've been kind of worried ever since.

    My driver has started down-shifting (automatic) but it's amazing how fast you can travel, even in first gear. So I was thinking 4WD might add a couple more brakes...hard to find answers to this.

    So thanks again!
         
        02-12-2013, 03:28 PM
      #14
    Foal
    Now you have the brake controller you can gently apply the trailer brakes a little before you apply your trucks brakes. It's helps you to stop and slow down much better. You get the momentum of that trailer to slow down and then you can steer and slow the whole thing down much more easily with the vehicle.

    My Dodge isn't 4 wheel drive. So I *have* to be smarter when I haul. Use what I've got.

    ;)
    Danielle
         
        02-12-2013, 04:23 PM
      #15
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Beling    
    Thanks so much for the replies!

    We've already burned out one set of brakes through sheer ignorance. We have a Ford 150, and NOW we have the electric brakes for the trailer with controller. Our route isn't long, but in a couple of cases, it involves several miles of steep, windy roads, all downhill. (No ice or snow, ever!)

    And during a recent trip, by the time we got home, I could smell that distinctive brakes-not-happy odor. Had them checked, they were fine, but I've been kind of worried ever since.

    My driver has started down-shifting (automatic) but it's amazing how fast you can travel, even in first gear. So I was thinking 4WD might add a couple more brakes...hard to find answers to this.

    So thanks again!
    Just curious, what type and size of trailer are you pulling with a 1/2 ton pickup?

    And you've just recently added brakes to the trailer? (Personally, I would NEVER pull a horse trailer without the trailer having its own brakes.)
         
        02-12-2013, 05:09 PM
      #16
    Trained
    Your brakes are getting too hot from overuse on the long downhill. You should be able to get higher temp brakes, but pads or shoes alone are no good without also upgrading the discs or drums. You could check out your options for the truck and the trailer.

    Before starting the downhill, can you come to a complete stop? Then keep it as slow as you can using gearing; when you brake, don't be gradual - brake as much as you dare, then release and use the gears again. That will give the brakes a bit of a chance to cool down. It's a test of skills for sure.

    I know one hill in somewhere in the eastern states where MDH drove truck and he stopped at the top, but by the time he was at the bottom he was clipping along pretty good. Scarey because there was a sharp corner at the bottom -- 60,000 lbs + yikes. I'm glad I wasn't with him. :)
         
        02-14-2013, 12:23 PM
      #17
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Beling    
    Thanks so much for the replies!

    We've already burned out one set of brakes through sheer ignorance. We have a Ford 150, and NOW we have the electric brakes for the trailer with controller. Our route isn't long, but in a couple of cases, it involves several miles of steep, windy roads, all downhill. (No ice or snow, ever!)

    And during a recent trip, by the time we got home, I could smell that distinctive brakes-not-happy odor. Had them checked, they were fine, but I've been kind of worried ever since.

    My driver has started down-shifting (automatic) but it's amazing how fast you can travel, even in first gear. So I was thinking 4WD might add a couple more brakes...hard to find answers to this.

    So thanks again!
    In your case, I'd go into low range....you'll still need to downshift into a lower gear before going down hill.

    It sounds like to me, your truck is a little light for what your doing....so use what ever you need to keep it under control.

    Let me remind you of one thing though....brakes are cheaper than transmissions and a whole lot easier to change.
         
        02-14-2013, 12:48 PM
      #18
    Green Broke
    My little story....

    We had an automatic 4wd ram 3500 pulling a 4 horse gooseneck

    Going down the mountains in CO we had our 4wd engaged and the trailer brakes/control engaged etc, it was DEC so ice and snow were a big factor....our truck brakes literally caught on fire. I'm sure it was a combination of things that caused this but I personally only drive a standard now and only engage my 4wd when the road conditions call for it
         
        02-14-2013, 09:19 PM
      #19
    Trained
    Aw, I miss my standard when I'm highway driving. You can still gear with an automatic though.
         
        02-14-2013, 10:11 PM
      #20
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by NorthernMama    
    Aw, I miss my standard when I'm highway driving. You can still gear with an automatic though.
    you! Nothing against them. I just trust/prefer a good standard any day after that little fiasco
         

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