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Bad Instructors

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  • bad instructors megan green
  • Bad horse trainers

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    05-24-2013, 11:16 AM
  #41
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydee    
Dick Stillwell once brought a wealthy woman from Greece to try a young horse my boss was selling that I'd done very basic jumping, XCountry & dressage with. I rode the mare first and then the woman got on and it was very obvious that she was only used to quiet, experienced push button horses. Annie dumped her very quickly as if to make a statement and we felt so embarrassed but he told his client straight that it was entirely her own fault and she wasn't ready for a green horse. He was so well respected she accepted the criticism without question and he then bought the mares younger sister himself which really pleased me because she had a personality I didn't really get on with!!!
Heavens he was a tyrant in his hey day!

He would have a long bamboo pole about 3" in diameter and 12' long. The end was split for about 6' and if a rider was nervy about jumping a fence or the rider was holding them back he would rattle it - brother, did those horses move forward when they heard that.

There were so many good instructors back then. Eddie Goldman, Chris Collins at Porlock were others.
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    05-24-2013, 08:46 PM
  #42
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruiser    
Instructors that can ride really well doesn't mean they can teach. Instructors that can't ride (due to health, injury etc) doesn't mean they are no good.
...and instructors who can teach, doesnt mean they can ride.

We have a local "trainer" who has a huge list of 2 students(from the same family might I add), and they are beginner riders. She can't teach more than basics, nor can she train those horses. She has another rider/boarder at the barn do all the riding and training for her if any problems arise. She always makes excuses why she isnt the one to ride, and she will bad mouth anyone who helps her in the attempt to make herself look better.

Luckily she's a nobody, and no one knows who she is. I have no respect for people like that, and no one has respect for her anyways.
     
    05-24-2013, 10:50 PM
  #43
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foxhunter    
Another thing a good instructor must understand is that not all people riding want to be competitive riders. Many just want to be comfortable on a horse and enjoy trail riding. This doesn't mean that they should not be encouraged to ride well, just that they will not want to be 'refined'
Very true.. Over the years, I've heard catty comments about myself and others "not riding correctly" from others whose opinions were not asked for.. and I have NO interest in show riding or advanced level riding. I can train and start a horse under saddle, get them going and respectful, but I really have zero interest in being a competitive rider. A pleasure mount is my goal and honestly, most of the time I prefer spending time with them on the ground.
Instructors need to know the difference as to what the client's goals and expectations are. A good instructor is worth their weight in gold.
     
    05-24-2013, 11:28 PM
  #44
Trained
Now that I am teaching actively as a business, I am seeing the whole other side to this whole thing. It really does take a lot of gusto for someone to get in front of some riders and start teaching. I wake up in a cold sweat from bad dreams about causing someone issues with their horse or not choosing the right exercises and what have you. My first few months I though I was going to die from anxiety!! But now I'm starting to trust myself a bit more and my students being happy is a great reminder too, especially when I start to doubt myself.
I like watching lessons and thinking "What would I do with that horse and rider" and seeing what the coach does do, and what the outcome is. I also really like watching lessons of my own students with my coach and that awesome moment when she picks an exercise we've done before, or chooses to do a new movement and I've already gone through the basics with that student and she is ready to ride through it. And conversely, when she picks up on something that I have not noticed, or overlooked and not corrected enough, and the change in the horse and rider with that small correction.

My longest student who came to me with a horse that would bolt when she put her leg on and who was a nervous bit chomper, calmly went through a baby flying changes exercise last week. I think the both of us were cheering and the horse thought we had lost our marbles being so excited that he did a change.

But, I have lost a few on the way. To me, I'm not offended, it does not reflect on the rider or the horse, just that the chemistry between all 3 did not work out. In the future, should any of them want to lesson with me, I would not have a grudge, nor if they rode with anyone else.
I myself have ridden and not ridden with so many people, and am friendly with them, that I know it is a fact of life that riders move on.


We have all, however, had our share of bad instructors!! Most instructors that I've moved on from are not bad, and were very good and valuable at the time. One in particular was actually, very, very bad. Mean to the horses and meaner to her students... I am so glad to be riding with the coach I am with now. Such a well of knowledge (it really is endless), and pushes everyone at the right speed. If I have to ride something twice, I get the look or a "you can ride that better". And we always end up laughing about something - usually baby horse antics :P
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    05-25-2013, 09:58 AM
  #45
Weanling
My experience...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fulford15    
Very true, I know many certified coaches that are not a professional coach. I don't know about the USA, but Equine Canada has very good programs for coaching certification and it is a lot more difficult in this day and age to get certified, you can't just be anyone from boo. I am just saying I would trust a certified coach more as they would have the needed Insurance to be coaching at shows or show barns, etc.. at least here in Canada. I am speaking from a wide range of coaches, obviously there will always be "that one or few" that have bad reputations. The horse world is full of gossip, and the horse communitys I have been in, you know who to trust.
Sadly in my community here in the US, I've found it harder to find people to trust. I've boarded my horses at about 5 places until I've finally rented a farm, and met several trainers who didn't take it so lightly when I told them I no longer wanted their services. My first one was the worst, and she tried to steal my horse so we had to have a deputy come and resolve the issue. Then she stole our saddle, and we never got it back. She gave us a decoy and since the saddle was new I couldn't yet tell one saddle from the other. They were very similar. Only one was a lot cheaper! This lady has been banned from several showgrounds, she's sold her farm and hopefully gotten all her horses confiscated. I've heard that without any money to feed her horses, half feral cats and herd of 15 corgis, they were all very skinny. This was one experience you should hope you never get.
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    05-25-2013, 07:05 PM
  #46
Foal
My first instructor was just very young and I think she was very good naturally and thus she couldnt teach me they whys & hows, only the mechanical "dos" if that makes any sense.

After 20 years away from horses, I started taking lessons at a local barn that was dressage focused and very busy. My experience there was REALLY weird and involved a bunch of instructors who obviously werent aligned very well about expectations.

They placed me with the youngest trainer who was more hunter-jumper. Her method was throwing me on an old grand prix horse and tryingt to get me to "feel" the right way he was moving. I really liked her, but she was often late to lessons everyday. I didnt mind too much, but I had been told it was my job to be tacked up with horse warmed up at lesson start time. So I would be in the arena riding before she got there, since she was often late. Nobody ever said anything, so I figured it was okay.

One day, I messed up and was warming up on a weekend she was offsite at a show, as-I had lost track of what week it was (I felt stupid and flaky). The head trainer sent a boarder down to tell me that she was not there, but that I should practice my flatwork anyways since it was a beautiful day and I was already warmed up. I thought this was a bit odd, but figured I would pay the fee for a ride on a school horse, so begin doing some work.

Then the third trainer came down and started yelling at me to get off the horse, as I should never have been riding it since my instructor wasnt there and yelling at me that I should not be rding the horse at all if she was not on premises. I was like wth is going on here???

I explained what the boarder had said-it turned out the head trainer had not said I should ride the horse,-it was the boarder who had inserted that suggestion, and the head trainer was totally upset I was riding the schooling horse. What was most annoying was the tone the second teacher took-like she was lecturing a child.

Perhaps I have spent too much time in the business world, but the whole thing was so unprofessional, unorganized and poorly done that I left and didnt go back, even though I really liked the first instructor. I was paying too much money to be treated like a "bad little girl" when they are the ones who are don't have thier sh*t together.

I looked around in my area and found a little stable out in the boonies and started taking lessons there from a lady who isnt at all well known. She has pointed out a couple of things in particular about how I ride that have helped me make huge leaps in understanding what is correct.

When I told her this, she said that she wasnt naturally a good rider and had to figure stuff out the hard way herself-thus it makes it easier to explain it to other people when she is teaching. Right now she doesnt have a lot of schooling horses, so I ride this slightly crazed horse who never really was finished out after being raced. We are learning a lot of stuff together, which is normally touted to be a bad thing, but it actually works okay in our scenario given where we are each at in our development.

She is, by far, the best instructor I have had.
     
    05-26-2013, 04:06 PM
  #47
Weanling
I Agree

Quote:
Originally Posted by oats    
Right now she doesnt have a lot of schooling horses, so I ride this slightly crazed horse who never really was finished out after being raced. We are learning a lot of stuff together, which is normally touted to be a bad thing, but it actually works okay in our scenario given where we are each at in our development.

She is, by far, the best instructor I have had.
For a lot of people the whole green horse, green rider thing doesn't really work, but I agree with you! It really helps your riding and bond with the horse to figure things out together, like me with my first horse, Gossip, who we got when he was only 4 and never broke to ride.
     
    05-27-2013, 03:03 AM
  #48
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gossip    
Sadly in my community here in the US, I've found it harder to find people to trust. I've boarded my horses at about 5 places until I've finally rented a farm, and met several trainers who didn't take it so lightly when I told them I no longer wanted their services. My first one was the worst, and she tried to steal my horse so we had to have a deputy come and resolve the issue. Then she stole our saddle, and we never got it back. She gave us a decoy and since the saddle was new I couldn't yet tell one saddle from the other. They were very similar. Only one was a lot cheaper! This lady has been banned from several showgrounds, she's sold her farm and hopefully gotten all her horses confiscated. I've heard that without any money to feed her horses, half feral cats and herd of 15 corgis, they were all very skinny. This was one experience you should hope you never get.
It's so unfortunate you had this experience. Sadly, there are disreputable "instructors" out there. I, too, had an acquaintance that was never my instructor, but claimed to be a trainer. After watching her run her disrespectful horses around like their tails were on fire without any direction or communication, I realized she was clueless. She even has video up with an ancient gelding "rescue" that she put a very obese man on who was sawing on his face and you could tell the poor thing was in pain, hollowing his back and flipping his head with this huge newbie bouncing on his spine.. it was sickening. The worst part is she has young people on unsafe horses and they have no idea she is endangering them. Funny thing is.. now this "trainer" needs a trainer to train her mare, who tried to kill the new trainer.. People like this absolutely ruin perfectly good horses.
It all comes down to buyer beware; one must do their research to weed out the incompetents and the dangerous.
     
    05-27-2013, 12:45 PM
  #49
Yearling
This is the summer of ignorant trainers in my area evidently.....

Now there's another idiot that stands up on top of the saddle and posts pictures of it.

Don't fall for parlor tricks.

Calmness is best demonstrated with a video of a small child riding, or some other display of practical skills - not standing up in the saddle like a moron.
     
    05-28-2013, 10:05 AM
  #50
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Druydess    
Very true.. Over the years, I've heard catty comments about myself and others "not riding correctly" from others whose opinions were not asked for.. and I have NO interest in show riding or advanced level riding. I can train and start a horse under saddle, get them going and respectful, but I really have zero interest in being a competitive rider. A pleasure mount is my goal and honestly, most of the time I prefer spending time with them on the ground.
Instructors need to know the difference as to what the client's goals and expectations are. A good instructor is worth their weight in gold.
A lot of college trained instructors do seem to put far too much emphasis on 'sitting pretty' in a 'posed position rather than actual effective riding
They get so rigid and tense because they're afraid their legs or hands might not be in the perfect place that they sit like stuffed dummies
The old 'boys' (and girls) concentrated on getting the rider relaxed and balanced first so they felt at ease on the horse. With more and more older people taking up riding its good if instructors would realize that unlike children they don't have rubber joints and many come with existing complications like arthritis that even long time older riders start to feel the problems with as the years go by
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