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getting into horse training, England

This is a discussion on getting into horse training, England within the Horse Trainers forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        01-29-2014, 03:50 PM
      #21
    Weanling
    I don't teach kids so I don't really know, it was just a thought. And me who has owned a horse for just over 2 years can read a horses body language whereas my dad who's had horses his whole life cannot (he really annoys me when he tells me to watch out when my horse turns around in the stable because she'll kick when she's clearly not going to) he isn't a great horseman yet he went out a won major competitions on his pony as a teenager and growing up. Yet people would rather ask him for advise on a behaviour issue rather than me because he's nearly 40 years older than me.

    Not saying with a choice between me and my dad means everything. But years of working with horses and experience doesn't always mean they'll do the job right.


    Unfortunately for me, people in this country don't seem to be willing to take people on for apprenticeships in horse training. Most just want a groom that'll get to ride occasionally. I'm quite lucky that I haven't been spilt with ponies since I was a child because I'd never have been how I am with horses if I had.

    The one horse I've really had to help in a situation was one that had been known for throwing riders and was horrible. Within one 2hr session with her I had her responding to pressure and coming when I ask her to. Unfortunately I forgot to get a lot of the bad bits on camera and only the part where I ride her for a little bit. She would've been a horse I'd have put a bit in if her owners could be bothered to have paid to get her Wolf teeth removed.

    If many of the people who 'knew about horses' had been there I'd never have been allowed on her. My biggest problem was that she had been left for 3 months then they got on with people both sides and had me stood in front. I was nearly crushed and the boy was thrown. They were going to tell her off! I managed to explain to them why we had caused her to do what she did and from that experience I'll never be a part of something like that again. That was a very bad in experienced mistake Web I'd made yet the people who 'knew' wanted to try again. I told them no and the owner let me work with her.

    I got a very long lecture afterwards about how she was dangerous and want allowed near her (not by my mum or dad) yet I still got on and rode her the next day.
         
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        01-29-2014, 03:57 PM
      #22
    Super Moderator
    I'm going to reply to you as someone who is British and also worked with horses in Britain
    Firstly - at 16 and without your own facilities, no matter how good you are, you aren't going to get any sort of clients worth having - you might pick up some of the sorts who want something cheap but if you have to pay livery costs somewhere that's got either a manege or Indoor school and stabling (because you can't break and school horses without those things and look professional) you won't make any profit at all
    Younger trainers with their own facilities (owned by parents) can sometimes make it if they're proven in some sort of competitive way or their parents are.
    You would need insurance and you won't get that at your age.
    I don't like to discourage anyone who's keen but if you seriously want to work with horses then enroll in an Equestrian College and take your BHS exams because most good employers now want that and it would look better on a CV or advert. If you don't take the college route your only other hope of getting experience is to find a competition yard that will give you a chance or a good dealer - but you have to be prepared to get on anything that comes on to the yard and all the good ones will want to see some sort of references before they take a risk on you.
    Golden Horse likes this.
         
        01-29-2014, 04:07 PM
      #23
    Weanling
    I'm going for an interview on Friday to a saddlery that do big competitions with brand prix dressage and eventers ect... They didn't ask for references, just to see what I can do. I get that without the facilities I'll never make a profit, but I'm not such much hoping for that rather than experience. I'm gleefully moving to a big race yard and I'll hopefully be able to help them prep their horses. They have one that is blind in one eye and I'm really hoping to get the chance to work with him because they sent him off but they gave him an hour before sending back. Hopefully having every day to work with him for months I might be able to back him. He'll never race, but you can tell he doesn't enjoy just living in a field with an old house that won't play with him.

    My .BHS is an issue because it's so expensive and the school refuses to help with Costa to a GCSE equivalent. I'm hoping t to get this apprenticeship and build from there as I thought that'd be the best way to go. I just wanted to see if anyone thought of another way that might not mean I have to leave home.
         
        01-29-2014, 04:19 PM
      #24
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by madyasmkey    
    I am quite good at pointing out what I have done wrong in situations with horses. My biggest problem is people want experience yet I can't get experience without being offered a chance.
    This is were my advice comes in handy. Work you butt off people will see it and come to know you as a hard, honest worker. Pick up training jobs where you can you might have to work for free for awhile that's ok. You are talking about the age old problem of every young person entering the work force. "everyone wants experience, I can't get work how can I gain experience". This is not new. Apprenticeship.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by madyasmkey    
    experience doesn't mean better.
    True experience doesn't always mean better, However a lot of the time it does.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by madyasmkey    
    A lot of the time kids can be better because a lot of the time younger people can read a horse better.
    Ok...? I don't know that I agree with this. Age doesn't determine what we are good at or not good at. Knowledge and experience would more accurately determine what we are good at.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by madyasmkey    
    but you seem to be assuming that because I'm young and I expressed my opinion that I think I'm better than everyone else.
    This is the problem you are having. You asked us to tell you what we think of you as a trainer. You asked for our assumptions based on your web site and what we know about you. (what we know about you is based on what you have said in this Forum) Now, you SEEM to be a little upset with our assumptions and opinions. Sorry, but our assumptions and opinions are ours you can' try to talk us out of them but because they are based on what you have written here it going to be hard to change a persons mind. If you don't like the assumptions and opinions that you have helped us come to then you MIGHT want to look at changing how you present yourself. For example being overly opinionated about things can win you friends, that share your opinion, but can also just as fast turn others off to you because of you opinions. Make sure the hill you are going to die on is worth dieing on.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by madyasmkey    
    Well I'm not and I'm trying hard to learn more about everyone's views but defending mine at the same time.
    This is Great for you to do. Learn, Learn, Learn, be slow to except what someone says, but be just as slow to throw out what someone says. Weigh everything. Be quick to listen and slow to speak. I can listen to anyone and everyone, some by experience I discard out of hand, new ideas I am slow to discard.
    Don't be so quick to speak out against something unless you KNOW it to be wrong. I have found in the training world there are few things I would dismiss as being wrong, are they the best? I think no. But do I speak that no.
    Why do you need to defend yourself in the realm of ideas if someone hold a different opinion then you so be it. You make it sound like learning about someone else and their views is a debate to be won or lost. When learning a different view learn it and experiment with it open minded. To say you are learning different views and yet defend your at the same time you are saying "I hear you view my is better" then why try to learn other views you are just going to defend you view. Just forget the other view and don't learn.
         
        01-29-2014, 04:21 PM
      #25
    Super Moderator
    I'm assuming that you have taken your GCSE's and not just quitting school?
    At your age you would be eligible for a lot of financial support to go to College - I'm not sure you've really looked into the costs very thoroughly
    Work on a racing yard is hard slog - don't imagine it will be anything but that.
         
        01-29-2014, 04:37 PM
      #26
    Weanling
    I'm don't GCSE's now. I don't intend on going to college or sixth form because I don't get on with people my age and do adults. So that's why I'm looking to go to an apprenticeship. It's now illegal for me to leave education until I'm 18 and if I could I'd drop out completely and work hard.

    I'm not going to be working there, livery. But these people are the nicest people I've ever met and I reckon they'd give me a chance with a horse that won't race anyway.
         
        01-29-2014, 04:40 PM
      #27
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CowboyBob    
    This is were my advice comes in handy. Work you butt off people will see it and come to know you as a hard, honest worker. Pick up training jobs where you can you might have to work for free for awhile that's ok. You are talking about the age old problem of every young person entering the work force. "everyone wants experience, I can't get work how can I gain experience". This is not new. Apprenticeship.



    True experience doesn't always mean better, However a lot of the time it does.


    Ok...? I don't know that I agree with this. Age doesn't determine what we are good at or not good at. Knowledge and experience would more accurately determine what we are good at.



    This is the problem you are having. You asked us to tell you what we think of you as a trainer. You asked for our assumptions based on your web site and what we know about you. (what we know about you is based on what you have said in this Forum) Now, you SEEM to be a little upset with our assumptions and opinions. Sorry, but our assumptions and opinions are ours you can' try to talk us out of them but because they are based on what you have written here it going to be hard to change a persons mind. If you don't like the assumptions and opinions that you have helped us come to then you MIGHT want to look at changing how you present yourself. For example being overly opinionated about things can win you friends, that share your opinion, but can also just as fast turn others off to you because of you opinions. Make sure the hill you are going to die on is worth dieing on.



    This is Great for you to do. Learn, Learn, Learn, be slow to except what someone says, but be just as slow to throw out what someone says. Weigh everything. Be quick to listen and slow to speak. I can listen to anyone and everyone, some by experience I discard out of hand, new ideas I am slow to discard.
    Don't be so quick to speak out against something unless you KNOW it to be wrong. I have found in the training world there are few things I would dismiss as being wrong, are they the best? I think no. But do I speak that no.
    Why do you need to defend yourself in the realm of ideas if someone hold a different opinion then you so be it. You make it sound like learning about someone else and their views is a debate to be won or lost. When learning a different view learn it and experiment with it open minded. To say you are learning different views and yet defend your at the same time you are saying "I hear you view my is better" then why try to learn other views you are just going to defend you view. Just forget the other view and don't learn.

    Btw. I like your way of explaining things. You make some very good points I hadn't considered :)
    CowboyBob and Chasin Ponies like this.
         
        01-29-2014, 04:49 PM
      #28
    Weanling
    SlideStop, maybe she thinks our walkers and/or canes would impede our ability to get out of the way?

    Mines a turbo charged model.............*grins*
    Tazzie and Foxhunter like this.
         
        01-29-2014, 05:25 PM
      #29
    Weanling
    Yep. Thanks for that, very useful input.
         
        01-29-2014, 07:32 PM
      #30
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by madyasmkey    
    ... And me who has owned a horse for just over 2 years can read a horses body language whereas my dad who's had horses his whole life cannot (he really annoys me when he tells me to watch out when my horse turns around in the stable because she'll kick when she's clearly not going to) .
    I think you Dad is giving you good advice, if I had a horse in a stall and it turned its but to me in the stall I would assume it was going to kick but because it could I would make them turn back around whither it was going to kick or not, its bad manners.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by madyasmkey    
    ... he isn't a great horseman yet he went out a won major competitions on his pony as a teenager and growing up. Yet people would rather ask him for advise on a behaviour issue rather than me because he's nearly 40 years older than me.
    And this is the trouble with a 16 year old trainer, you can't fight peoples prospective. You can only work to change it by what you do not by what you say.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by madyasmkey    
    ... But years of working with horses and experience doesn't always mean they'll do the job right.
    You are right, but again it's their prospective. Being 16 you can't fight it you can only work hard to change it.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by madyasmkey    
    ... Unfortunately for me, people in this country don't seem to be willing to take people on for apprenticeships in horse training. Most just want a groom that'll get to ride occasionally. I'm quite lucky that I haven't been spilt with ponies since I was a child because I'd never have been how I am with horses if I had.
    Then take the job as a groom and ride when you can work your butt off with a trainer with a good name until you build a name for yourself.
    morganarab94 likes this.
         

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