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Getting into the training business?

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        12-29-2013, 11:37 PM
      #11
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by eventrider    
    I'm 15 and I was wondering how you could start getting into the horse training and selling business. I have my own horse and have been riding for 11 years. I have a lot of expierence with horses I was just curious about how to begin. I trained a 3 year old paint at my barn because no one else wanted to. I eventually got her to jump and do basic dressage a few months later they sold her for like $5000. Any ideas or tips?
    For starters you will have to be a bit older and be legal of age to be ale to ride all sorts of horses which includes stallions etc. For insurance purposes you also need to be of legal age. You know to me, the key is to be a successful rider. You have to be able to ride at higher levels and regularly win and do well. You have to be able to gain that experience with all sorts of horses, good and bad to be able to know how to coach and ride not only yourself through situations, but others who you will be teaching.
    It's important to also educate yourself through school and some of the programs out there that are specific to business and the equine industry. It's important for you to build relationships with other trainers, stables, vets etc.

    This is a big word of mouth business, and your riding and how well you do is your live resume when people are looking for a trainer or instructor.
    GotaDunQH and Chasin Ponies like this.
         
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        01-01-2014, 12:43 AM
      #12
    Trained
    I am with you, M2G. I really like to see my trainers riding and winning at high levels. I watch who ever is winning then I start talking to people to see how they are as trainers and how they are as far as customer care. So keep riding and showing, and when you ride for someone else try your darndest to keep them happy, remember they are the customer and they are paying for a service so treat them like they ARE. I have moved my horses from trainers for just that reason.
    upnover and MangoRoX87 like this.
         
        01-25-2014, 09:32 AM
      #13
    Weanling
    Going to an equine college will not get you decent jobs (been there, done that) and those colleges will not tell you that the only graduates that get jobs either already have a home stable or work as a lowly groom. An equine degree still basically means nothing to most horse people, experience and success do.
    Working under a successful trainer helps you with experience but bear in mind that it is usually an unpaid position and that some trainers will only use you to do the menial work and teach you nothing. Can you afford to support yourself while you work for free?
    The only trainers that can make a living are the ones who have invested at least several years in showing and winning (preferably some championships) in the discipline they train in. Then, a few people take a chance with them and if they can take those clients up that same ladder, word of mouth takes care of the rest.
    Don't forget that when you train horses you will have to also be a people person and deal with ignorance, arguments and blind ambition. People will try to push you into the "quick & dirty" training methods just so they can win at shows. Most trainers I know didn't think this through and hate having to deal with clients-they thought it would all be about the horses!
    showjumperachel likes this.
         
        01-26-2014, 01:20 AM
      #14
    Weanling
    It depends what field you want to pursue all I train is trail horses very rewarding for me I love the outdoors and hate areanas perfect match and all the trainers I know non are rich and I know some of the best
    Chasin Ponies likes this.
         
        01-27-2014, 01:34 AM
      #15
    Foal
    I became a trainer after learning a lot from not so broke horses, and also went to a riding school in New Zealand. Alot of the time I'd get business from people that saw how I was with my horses and how well trained they were. A lot of it comes from being personable and friendly. I've gotten a lot of clients by just making small talk while riding, giving them compliments for little things, and offering advice if they're having trouble. Don't force your advice on people just say hey I've got some tips.

    I've gotten a gig before at a big show barn by answering an ad for a working student. I was broke at the time and really needed something that payed but I figured I could always at least gain more experience. Within 3 days I was head trainer.

    Work with lots of different horses since your young take lessons when you can, watch other trainers because you can learn a lot from others, watch lots of videos and really try to absorb. A lot of the time when I was younger if there were horses that needed exercise I'd volunteer, I'd also volunteer with people who were having horses misbehave. I wouldn't ask for money but friendliness and good riding is the best way to get your name out.

    When it comes to picking up project horses and retraining them my advice is to flip them as fast as possible. Get your work done, get them out there, and get them for sale and sold. You can start loosing money fast when holding onto them too long.
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        01-27-2014, 01:36 AM
      #16
    Foal
    Feel free to pm me for more tips. I'm always happy to share.
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        01-27-2014, 12:37 PM
      #17
    Green Broke
    Going to an equine college and getting a degree will not get you a training job but going to good college with an equine program and getting a degree can give you a back up plan, teach you some business skills that are often lacking among horse people, and possibly hook you up with some connections that could give you a start to work your way up. Word of mouth and results at shows is really the best advertising. I'm not saying the trainers with the most blue ribbons are going to be the best but if I see a trainer ride well and get good results with a horse I"m much more likely to use their services rather then someone I just found online.
         
        01-27-2014, 06:32 PM
      #18
    Yearling
    Being a trainer is not all it's cracked up to be. Be prepared to make no money and work very long hours 7 days a week.

    Going to school has an advantage ONLY from a management/business end...on how to actually run your business.

    The rest of being a trainer comes from the school of hard knocks. You start by working at a successful training barn and be prepared to clean stalls, work long hours for little pay or for a trade off in your lodging and food, and to do the grunt work. From there, if you are a good hand....you might be given a "project" to start....the trainer does the finish work. If you are REALLY good at that, you'll get more horses to start...and help finish. From there, you'll help the trainer through the whole process and show some of the finished product. When you've done that for a few years....then you can go out on your own if you have made a name for yourself.

    Being a trainer goes so far beyond just riding...you have to learn how to deal with "personalities", the cost alone in overhead to have a facility is incredible. My trainer has been doing it for over 2 decades, he has a World Championship under his belt...and he breaks even every month.

    So if you want to be a trainer, that's very admirable. Just make sure you have a second job that pays your bills and health insurance.
         
        01-28-2014, 12:51 PM
      #19
    Green Broke
    Horses are a very small part of becoming a successful trainer. You HAVE to be a people person and a business person or most likely you won't do well. If training only consisted of just working horses, I don't think I would have left the industry.

    I went to college to become a horse trainer. I got out of it last year. I pay for school myself and cannot pay off my loans on a trainer's salary. I had to be realistic. Honestly, I would advise against going to college for training. If anything get your business degree and just go right in working for trainers. You will learn more in the long run.

    Being only 15, now is a great time so start working for someone. Cleaning stalls, lunging, grooming, etc. Get out there and start making connections. Learn everything you can.
    Chasin Ponies likes this.
         
        02-05-2014, 07:17 PM
      #20
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GotaDunQH    
    Being a trainer is not all it's cracked up to be. Be prepared to make no money and work very long hours 7 days a week.

    Going to school has an advantage ONLY from a management/business end...on how to actually run your business.

    The rest of being a trainer comes from the school of hard knocks. You start by working at a successful training barn and be prepared to clean stalls, work long hours for little pay or for a trade off in your lodging and food, and to do the grunt work. From there, if you are a good hand....you might be given a "project" to start....the trainer does the finish work. If you are REALLY good at that, you'll get more horses to start...and help finish. From there, you'll help the trainer through the whole process and show some of the finished product. When you've done that for a few years....then you can go out on your own if you have made a name for yourself.

    Being a trainer goes so far beyond just riding...you have to learn how to deal with "personalities", the cost alone in overhead to have a facility is incredible. My trainer has been doing it for over 2 decades, he has a World Championship under his belt...and he breaks even every month.

    So if you want to be a trainer, that's very admirable. Just make sure you have a second job that pays your bills and health insurance.
    This is all good advice.
    I was a trainer when I was quite young. I worked hard from a very young age, I found the racetrack by myself when I was 17 and started working there full time. I was assistant trainer to a working cowhorse trainer when I was 19. I took horses south for the first time when I was 23. I landed a job training problem horses for a legendary trainer when I was 25.
    It's hard work, people don't like to pay their bills, I'm still owed money from when I was training racehorses in 2008.

    ALSO, a side effect I never anticipated is that I ruined a perfectly good hobby by turning it into a job. At one point I was getting on 20+ horses a day, I never rode my own horses. Now riding is fun, but it's not the same as it was before I made training my career.

    PS they don't pay you to get on the easy horses, or so was my experience.
         

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