Is this a sign of a "bad" instructor / issues, or things like that just happen? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 26 Old 03-17-2013, 09:30 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman View Post
Tataaaaaaaaaa....I wholeheartedly and absolutely agree with you on this!!!!
Learning from mistakes, handling situations better, learn to read horses, learn what to do if the dependable school horse is frisky....all part of becoming a rider.
jumping after half-hour weekly lessons is, IMO too early.
My daughter absolutely loved that she got to experience those situations. She said that this is the only way for her to get a feel for it and to learn how to handle herself and the horse.

She loved jumping, but switched into a Western barn as eagerly and now loves all the instruction she's getting on steering.
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post #12 of 26 Old 03-17-2013, 09:49 PM
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Originally Posted by horselessmom View Post
My daughter absolutely loved that she got to experience those situations. She said that this is the only way for her to get a feel for it and to learn how to handle herself and the horse.

She loved jumping, but switched into a Western barn as eagerly and now loves all the instruction she's getting on steering.
Great! Then she'll stick with it
Overcoming these obstacles makes her strong and confident....not only around horses.
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post #13 of 26 Old 03-17-2013, 10:05 PM
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Horses don't always behave like they should so a horse can, out the blue, decide to act like a twit.

My youngest kiddo arrived early for her lesson so my trainer told her she could go grab her very ancient, deadbroke pony from the pasture. Pony saw her, spun around and kicked her. The pony had NEVER so much as threatened to kick anyone before!

I had a lesson horse that got mad that I was insisting that he needed to pick up speed at the trot and took off at a dead gallop. I will never forget my trainer very calmly saying "Oooook.... we didn't need him quite that fast, lets slow down a bit". I've NEVER had that horse do that again (trainer is now a very good friend and lets me ride him whenever) and I even trust him with both my kiddos.

My kiddos current lesson pony is known as the "one speed wonder" (his one speed is a dead stop), I've ridden him many times and it's the same ride each time... go, go, go, I mean freakin GO!! He makes Western Pleasure horses look speedy..... which is great for beginning riders but I'm falling asleep up there! My horse was on stall rest and the trainer wanted some company on a trail ride with a fresh horse so I took him since the deadhead would make a great, steady, calm companion horse, right? Nope.... took one look at a LEAF, jumped the leaf and took off at a gallop. I nearly fell off laughing at him since the fresh horse was just standing there going "what is your problem dude... it's a LEAF!" but boy was I grateful I was riding and not my kids!
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post #14 of 26 Old 03-20-2013, 12:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman View Post
.
jumping after half-hour weekly lessons is, IMO too early.
Umm... I don't see how this makes sense.

Any time spent in the saddle over a year can lead to riding more advanced. Even 30 minutes each week (which is what I was doing, as was my ride-mate who DID learn to jump)

I would never leave a child unattended... especially on a squirrely horse. My past riding instructors would have me get off and they get on to feel the horse to see if it was the horse messing with the rider or if there was something going on with the horse itself. Once that was sorted, I'd get back on.

"Strength is the ability to use a muscle without tension"
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post #15 of 26 Old 03-20-2013, 10:22 AM
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Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel View Post
Umm... I don't see how this makes sense.

Any time spent in the saddle over a year can lead to riding more advanced. Even 30 minutes each week (which is what I was doing, as was my ride-mate who DID learn to jump)

I would never leave a child unattended... especially on a squirrely horse. My past riding instructors would have me get off and they get on to feel the horse to see if it was the horse messing with the rider or if there was something going on with the horse itself. Once that was sorted, I'd get back on.
Well, maybe I'm too "old school" then. With weekly lessons, we would start out with cavaletti work to learn the two-point, and do, at the most, 3,4 cavalettis low and the last with a little more distance, at it's highest setting. And of course trot only.
I have seen the other extreme.4 or 5 lessons and kids jump...no idea on steering and what correct brakes are, but " my kid is jumping". You can imagine what kind of rider that will create......
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post #16 of 26 Old 03-20-2013, 10:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Skyseternalangel View Post
Umm... I don't see how this makes sense.

Any time spent in the saddle over a year can lead to riding more advanced. Even 30 minutes each week (which is what I was doing, as was my ride-mate who DID learn to jump)

I would never leave a child unattended... especially on a squirrely horse. My past riding instructors would have me get off and they get on to feel the horse to see if it was the horse messing with the rider or if there was something going on with the horse itself. Once that was sorted, I'd get back on.
It makes sense to me. That's only 24 hours of riding time for a 9 year old. Someone older could possibly do it. Gifted or not that's a short time to learn a lot of things.
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post #17 of 26 Old 03-20-2013, 01:05 PM
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Riding idiot ponies or difficult ones is what has made me the rider I am today.
We started with Harvey who was a Difficult "safe" pony, in that he was difficult to ride, very oppinionated and would regularly tip you onto the floor (girls on the yard used to take bets on it) however he was not a bolter, a bucker or a rearer. When he put you on the floor it was never hard enough to do any serious damage.
I graduated from him to Pride who was safe as houses but only if you could actualy get him moving in the first place and he was a nightmare on the ground.
Then went to the nutty arab who was explosive and speed inclined.
Then I got stan who was highly schooled, quirky and had one heck of a buck in him.

All those ponies have made me as a rider and I wouldnt change them for the world. They have given me the skills to deal with a pony who is not a robot!
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RIDE your horse FORWARDS and keep him STRAIGHT

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post #18 of 26 Old 03-20-2013, 01:11 PM
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Every schoolhorse has a quirk. It's up to the instructor to put the right kid on the right pony at the right moment.
I remember well, I " graduated" from the robot horse, slowly slowly, to the most educated, but also most quirky( boy could she buck), WITHIN MY GROUP.if I had to ride in a different group, especially higher level, I got robot horse. To learn without distraction. Once I had it down, I would again graduate.
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post #19 of 26 Old 03-20-2013, 05:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman View Post
Well, maybe I'm too "old school" then. With weekly lessons, we would start out with cavaletti work to learn the two-point, and do, at the most, 3,4 cavalettis low and the last with a little more distance, at it's highest setting. And of course trot only.
I have seen the other extreme.4 or 5 lessons and kids jump...no idea on steering and what correct brakes are, but " my kid is jumping". You can imagine what kind of rider that will create......
Quote:
Originally Posted by natisha View Post
It makes sense to me. That's only 24 hours of riding time for a 9 year old. Someone older could possibly do it. Gifted or not that's a short time to learn a lot of things.
Okay I see your point now. Deserthorsewoman, I too am "old schooled" in terms of drawing out each lesson so one learns correctly the entire way before he or she advances.

But little ones can improve a lot in just one lesson, especially if on a horse that is forgiving. I would definitely not rush to jump (I don't even jump) but if the rider had a secure seat in walk trot, and canter.. then yeah it'd be logical to try the next step up.

And wouldn't it be 26 hours? 52 weeks, 30 mins per week... 26 hours...?

"Strength is the ability to use a muscle without tension"
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post #20 of 26 Old 03-20-2013, 07:32 PM
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Minus one week Xmas and one week Easter and 2 weeks summer holidays with the grandparents.....
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