11 month boistrous colt, 6 weeks gelded but still a massive handful-any suggestions?! - Page 2
   

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11 month boistrous colt, 6 weeks gelded but still a massive handful-any suggestions?!

This is a discussion on 11 month boistrous colt, 6 weeks gelded but still a massive handful-any suggestions?! within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Gelding 9 month old
  • Can you put a young 10 month old gelding with older geldings

 
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    05-04-2011, 07:02 PM
  #11
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by hayleyrc    
thanks, I think I'll definitely try the lunging then! :)
Also, I've heard from several places that a water pistol works wonders for fiesty youngsters - short quick shock when they advance for a nip - would this maybe be worth trying too?
ive also heard of people doing with an air gun type thing? Idk what they used but same idea but with air and not water, not sure how it works I would definitely look it up before doing it. I use that trick on dogs I train sometimes, while it works sometimes I've had dogs that get even nastier when you do it. While horses and dogs aren't the same its a word of caution, it may work it may not and it may result in a rather aggressive reaction. Has anyone else done this with success?
     
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    05-05-2011, 12:29 AM
  #12
Green Broke
This sounds so much like my 9 1/2 month old gelding. Sigh! I have been trying to cure his nipping practically since he was born. I cut out all his grain about a week ago and he seems to have calmed down a little, but he still tries to nip. It's gotten to where every time I work with him I am frustrated and ready to give up.

If I correct him for nipping (with a dressage whip) he will now try to bolt away. I actually decided to order him a muzzle so maybe I could pony and lead him without having to correct for nipping constantly. I feel like all our interactions are negative and I am about ready to pull my hair out. So I will have to see how the muzzle situation works out.

Here are a couple threads I started about my colt's issues. I got a lot of good advice. Maybe some will be of help to you.

New game plan for my colt- how does this sound?

Colt thinks life is a joke, is there hope for us?
     
    05-05-2011, 02:48 AM
  #13
Green Broke
I would not lunge something that young! Very bad for joints.

Have you got access to a field full of old brood mares, preferably one with an alpha mare in it?
Possibly phone local studs and see if they have one that you could pay for him to be put in with for a while.
Older mares wont take any crap from him and will teach him manners. It sounds like because he has been separated so young he hasnt had chance to learn from a mare what is acceptable and what is not.

Be warned though that the mares will not be gentle. It is unlikely that they will actualy do Harm but you may not want to watch it.

I turned my 3 yr old out with some stroppy mares and it realy taught him how to socialise properly.

Also it can take a good 6 months after gelding before the majority of colty behavior stops some of it doesnt stop in some horses.
     
    05-05-2011, 09:57 AM
  #14
Foal
I personally don't see any problem with a little bit of lunging like 10 minutes at a time. He nipping does need to be corrected, you can work on this a little at a time too. Desentize him to things around his head, as well as his whole body, then if he bites/trys to bite you, smack him... after you smack him go back to desentizing him.he'll get the idea after a bit.IMO smacking is equal to biting back, and if done PROPERlY will not cause him to be head shy. One thing to remeber is that he is still very young,so don't expect him to behave all the time. I would suggest putting him out with some other older horses wether mares or geldings. They will help to teach him some manners.

On the gun thing. I would not do this, I've had to many horses who are gun shy, the smallest pop of any kind of gun and they literally jump out of their skin. While it might accomplish what you want, the side effects will be terrible. My mare was sentive anyway and would jump and the smallest pop or crack, and just stand there shaking. As much as I tried I couldn't get her over her fear, although I did teach her to come to me/look for me as comfort and not bolt when she heard a noise,but she was by no means over the gun shyness.: a water gun might be ok,but i'd still find a different way if it was me.
     
    05-05-2011, 06:36 PM
  #15
Showing
If he bites you do not hit him. He will learn how to bite and duck before you can hit him. By all means yell OW and flap your elbows to startle him. If you have access to a smaller pen turn him loose, pull up a chair and good book, have a riding crop handy and pay him no attention. Let him investigate but not crowd your space. Stand and move him out of your space by waving your hands. After an hour put a small pile of hay in there and go sit down. Give him a minute then go drive him away from the hay and stand there. (horses do this to each other). When he's watching you go and sit down. Just keep reclaiming the pile until he will eat and watch you at the same time. Don't do anything else with him, just put him away. Do this the next day until he starts watching you as you approach. In the field always approach from straight on. Predators come from the side and rear, never from the front.
     
    05-05-2011, 06:55 PM
  #16
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
If he bites you do not hit him. He will learn how to bite and duck before you can hit him. By all means yell OW and flap your elbows to startle him. If you have access to a smaller pen turn him loose, pull up a chair and good book, have a riding crop handy and pay him no attention. Let him investigate but not crowd your space. Stand and move him out of your space by waving your hands. After an hour put a small pile of hay in there and go sit down. Give him a minute then go drive him away from the hay and stand there. (horses do this to each other). When he's watching you go and sit down. Just keep reclaiming the pile until he will eat and watch you at the same time. Don't do anything else with him, just put him away. Do this the next day until he starts watching you as you approach. In the field always approach from straight on. Predators come from the side and rear, never from the front.
This is a really interesting idea. I've heard people saying before that the dominant mare controls when youngsters are allowed to eat - is that what I would be reinforcing using these tactics?
     
    05-05-2011, 06:59 PM
  #17
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by jwells84    
I personally don't see any problem with a little bit of lunging like 10 minutes at a time. He nipping does need to be corrected, you can work on this a little at a time too. Desentize him to things around his head, as well as his whole body, then if he bites/trys to bite you, smack him... after you smack him go back to desentizing him.he'll get the idea after a bit.IMO smacking is equal to biting back, and if done PROPERlY will not cause him to be head shy. One thing to remeber is that he is still very young,so don't expect him to behave all the time. I would suggest putting him out with some other older horses wether mares or geldings. They will help to teach him some manners.
I know what you mean about expecting him to behave all the time - sometimes I wonder whether I expect too much from him at such a young age. If that is the case, could I not be doing more damage by punishing him for what I see as bad behaviour which he may grow out of, by the time the testosterone and coltishness is out of his system? Could we both benefit from maybe just throwing him away for six months and seeing whether there was any behavioural changes?
     
    05-06-2011, 08:46 PM
  #18
Foal
Well. Both does have it's pro's and con's but I personally think that young horses should be allowed to be young, untill they can understand better what it is that we are asking.Puttinghim out with other horses is very benificial to him, because they will teach him how to be a horse, and what is expected of him from his herd. You then can take those manners, and let him know YOU are his herd when it is just the two of you and that YOU are the head horse..I have found that babies. (long yearlings and under) have a hard time recognizing that. Some do,but the majority either don't care, or don't reconize it. With mine who acted this way, I made sure they knew the basics, how to lead/lunge/load. That way if I had a need to take them somewhere I wouldnt have to teach them on the way. Then I just let them be ahorse. It worked out the best for me.
     
    05-06-2011, 08:59 PM
  #19
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by faye    
I would not lunge something that young! Very bad for joints.

Have you got access to a field full of old brood mares, preferably one with an alpha mare in it?
Possibly phone local studs and see if they have one that you could pay for him to be put in with for a while.
Older mares wont take any crap from him and will teach him manners. It sounds like because he has been separated so young he hasnt had chance to learn from a mare what is acceptable and what is not.

Be warned though that the mares will not be gentle. It is unlikely that they will actualy do Harm but you may not want to watch it.

I turned my 3 yr old out with some stroppy mares and it realy taught him how to socialise properly.

Also it can take a good 6 months after gelding before the majority of colty behavior stops some of it doesnt stop in some horses.

I agree with faye!!! Putting him out with a mare, IMO, is your best bet! When I first got Rodeo, he had only been out with another colt after he was weaned, and was therefore, pushy, not horribly so, just enough to get under your skin....after I got him, and put him out with some mares, he is like a totally new horse!!! Has complete respect now! Id go towards this route! Faye is 100% right by saying that older mares wont take any crap from him! My guy learned FAST about manners, respect, and how to treat other horses!!! Good Luck, and keep us updated!!
     
    05-06-2011, 09:23 PM
  #20
Foal
Using a water pistol on a horse that doesnt respect your authority is an accident waiting to happen. I recently was given a youngster to train and he does the same thing, if he bites me I bite him back and same goes for if he kicks out at me. Free lunging is the greatest for younger horses, gives them the chance to see if they can trust you or not, it still lets you be in control but it also gives the horse the ability to move freely.
     

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behaviour, biting, foal

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