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12 yr old adopted mare bites and corrals

This is a discussion on 12 yr old adopted mare bites and corrals within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        01-15-2013, 10:50 AM
      #11
    Green Broke
    Ditto the great advice on how to correct her.

    I just want to reinforce that she already has it in her head, she has established dominance over you.

    Once you firmly establish you are the herd leader, you may never be able to totally relax in her presence. You might always have to have eyes in the back of your head so-to-speak.

    Not all alpha dominant horses behave that way. Mine never has but, the bully who is third in the pecking order and wishes he was first, does.

    He's been in my herd 16+ years and I still can't trust him 100% if I don't have the buggy whip (an extension of my arm) with me when I open the paddock gate to let everyone out.

    Little-by-little he will gradually walk closer to me until he would be pushing me to open the gate so his Legend-In-His-Own-Mind-Self could hurry into the pasture. He freqently gets poked in the chest or wailed alongside his neck with the buggy whip because he is a horse who believes in "better to ask forgiveness than permission" but all he gets is pushed back by me

    I understand your situation and what would happen to the horse, ultimately, were it not for you. As long as you are an assertive person, things should work out.

    What about vets? In case of emergency, do you have a veterinarian in your area?
         
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        01-15-2013, 11:11 AM
      #12
    Super Moderator
    This is so sad
    Far too many totally inexperienced people going out buying horses from slaughter yards because they are cheap and they think its a lovely thing to do and this is how it ends up
    My best suggestion is you part company with the horse - maybe a rescue centre that has one that's been evaluated and had some training would help in a part ex?
    The horse is bullying you and could eventually become really dangerous, you could try going in with a hefty stick or a lunge whip but that could just turn a bad situation into a worse one because some horses have no respect even for that especially if it sees you as lower down the food chain so to speak
    This is why I don't approve of hand feeding treats other than in a first learning situation as a reward in some situations and you need to stop doing it NOW. My horses come to me because I expect them too not because they will get stuffed full of cookies or carrots. My old mare had been treated like this for the first 3 years of her life - she would have killed someone - which is why she was going to be euthanised.
    Last resort - Can you keep the horse on a bare patch so it has to rely on you to catch it and lead it to be fed?
    themacpack and Corporal like this.
         
        01-15-2013, 11:11 AM
      #13
    Green Broke
    Uhm get a trainer chances are once she has that foal she could get worse and you don't seem tk have the knowledge to deal with that. Not to mention a foal who wont know a thing but what you and mom teach him bad or good.

    You need to get assertive However I fear that you will get hurt as she could get nasty before she gets even remotely better. Please be careful and be smart.
    Corporal likes this.
         
        01-15-2013, 11:16 AM
      #14
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by chile888    
    thank you all for your imput. Now I see that she is crowding and trying to assume the leadership role. Apparently there was a vacuum. I was so eager to give her some good treatment after what she had been through, that I wasnt assertive enough. For those who offered practical advice, I will start using the methods you described. Thanks for the movement Saddlebags, I instinctively moved away from her in that way. Going to need a stick or whip I see. LisaG, no horse rescue, am in the country in southern Chile, 5 hours from a big city. Rookie, yes I am guilty of anthropomorphism, thanks. I did not buy her to ride her, only to give her the freedom to be a horse in a nice environment and live out her years without being ridden or used to pull wagons etc. And to have a colt. She was mated last month. Thanks Spotted.
    If I give up on her, it is a trip to the slaughterhouse. I have no intention of giving up. Will keep you all posted. If you don't here from me, I wasnt fast enough in moving away or firm enough. But I will be back.
    I really don't want to come over as being a horrible person here - but I can't believe that you would have a horse from a slaughter yard put in foal when there are already unwanted horses piling up all over the place
    If you are so inexperienced how on earth will you cope with a mare foaling, handling the foal, training it etc?
    You need to get some expert help ASAP
         
        01-15-2013, 11:50 AM
      #15
    Yearling
    Unfortunatley I don't want to be nasty either but I totally agree with Jaydee. IF she was "mated" before she was rescued fine. If you had her bred, then that's something entirely different...and very irresponsible just because you have the eyes for a baby.

    Mares need shots, vet care, pre-natal checkups, and so much more when pregnant. Not to mention if you have an emergency you need a vet on hand to call. Pastures have to be safe and baby proof. I could go on and on here. Babies take $$$, time and knowledge. If you're having this many issues with the mare now it's only going to get worse as she is in foal longer then has her baby. You're going to have an aggressive mare with a foal at her side.

    That's an accident or tragedy waiting to happen...
    themacpack, FaydesMom and jaydee like this.
         
        01-15-2013, 11:54 AM
      #16
    Yearling
    Haven't read other comments.


    Just because she came from an abusive situation; slaughter yard...anywhere
    You don't baby it, you treat it like a horse.
    Correct it like you would any horse.
    No more hand feeding. Carry a lunge whip.
    If she gets to blocking you/biting/kicking. One of those will be long enough you can get her but she can't get you.
    You tell her to move like normal. She doesn't move you get after her with the whip.
    Make it sting. So it counts, if she kicks at it, pop her again.

    Sounds like you need to get rid of her though, from your post you don't spud like you will be able to do this.
         
        01-15-2013, 12:59 PM
      #17
    Started
    I hope your safe and can protect yourself....But honestly this thread screams future hospital visit. I hope you have a good doctor near where you live!
    Corporal likes this.
         
        01-15-2013, 01:01 PM
      #18
    Green Broke
    Was she bred when you got her (and how did you come by this information considering she was bought "from the slaughterhouse"), or is that something that has taken place since you took possession?
         
        01-15-2013, 01:37 PM
      #19
    Trained
    We all wish that you had bought another horse, one with proper training, even if he/she was green. Yes, I KNOW we all started our "horse crazy" with the idea that we could have a great relationship with a horse that appreciates us. The whole idea of "rescuing" an animal fills us with a hope that the horse will be grateful and become obedient "just because." Not EVER so.
    The weight difference between a human and a horse is similar to the weight difference between a domestic cat and a human, except the cat has claws, flexibility and instincts for protection and we don't. Well trained and trustworthy horses are trained to never step on our feet and never to swing around in fear and slam their bodies into us. Imagine tripping and falling on a cat. If the cat doesn't get out of the way, the damage is very serious. If the human doesn't get out of the way of the "out of control" horse, the damage is very serious, or your own demise.
    Yesterday, my QH, "Buster" tried to step on my foot reaching for hay in the shelter manger. I kicked him in the "shins" and backed him to the corner of the shelter. I didn't whip him or frighten him, but, instead, I re-established the herd dynamic--I am the head broodmare, and you are ALWAYS #2 in the relationship. It would take pages for me to describe to YOU the specifics to follow. Too much and he might kick me in the face if confronted bc of fear. Too little, and he might kick me in the face when I ask him to move over bc he's treating me like just another 1,000 pound horse who won't get hurt but the kick. Either way and I could be in a world of hurt.
    Anybody here with years of horse training experience--I have owned horses for 27 1/2 years--is CONSTANTLY training their horses to keep the training fresh. Even the best trained horse can be trained dangerous habits, and one way to badly train is using food as a reward, as you described.
    Nobody sells their best horse, but many trainers have prices on their next-to-favorite horse(s), so good horses can be had. Right now we have a ton of unwanted horses available anywhere.
    To simply suggest reselling her doesn't make it happen today or tomorrow. Even if you can figure out how to re-home her you will still need to deal with her daily, for the time being. There are MANY people here that are happy to help with basic training. CHERIE is very willing to talk to people with problems like this, and could walk you through some basic training and has loads of good advice. IF you get cable or satellite, start IMMEDIATELY watching Clinton Anderson's programs, on RFD.tv. IMHO, he has a knack for communicating training methods, and he deals with many spoiled or ruined or green-and-never-disciplined animals, as well as horses with big fears.
    We cannot save all of the unwanted horses, or unwanted dogs, or unwanted cats. (No problem with unwanted chickens, bc lots of us know how to butcher, ha, ha!)
    Don't let your ego that "you can handle this" get you crippled. The best of us have gotten hurt--I had a broken humerous from being thrown in 2004, but most people don't ride their horses in CW battles and next to exploding cannons--not enough preparation for THAT horse, and that's why I got hurt.
         
        01-15-2013, 01:42 PM
      #20
    Foal
    I got her at an animal auction, the only other bidder was a butcher.
    There are no 'horse rescue' centers in this part of the world
    Some of you act as if she would be better off slaughtered. Try putting yourself in her horseshoes for a moment.
    I know I have a lot to learn but I am willing to learn and this life is worth saving.
    Thanks Janna and Corporal, for the constructive advice.
    Walkinthewalk and Barrel RacingArabian... I am very assertive and have been called a bossy headstrong, opinionated wiseass independent b**ch many times and by the more literate critics, an alpha female with control issues.
         

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    aggression, biting, bullying

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