4-Part Video Series: How to Cure Herd Boudness and Barn/Buddy Sourness - Page 2
 
 

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4-Part Video Series: How to Cure Herd Boudness and Barn/Buddy Sourness

This is a discussion on 4-Part Video Series: How to Cure Herd Boudness and Barn/Buddy Sourness within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        06-25-2014, 02:42 PM
      #11
    Yearling
    What do you do when you have the opposite problem --- say another horse is sticking to the horse you are riding like glue
         
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        06-25-2014, 03:54 PM
      #12
    Yearling
    Am I right in thinking this is to train a horse to leave/ride out from his/her group?

    She is allowed to go back to them, but when there is put to work pushing/driving one of the horses around rather than just loafing there with them (hard).

    Then when ridden away and comfortable with that gets to rest in the shade (easy).

    Afraid I only watched the first and part of the second, then a glimpse of the fourth parts. Will watch more as time allows. Am I on the right track?

    Nice group of horses.
    Ian McDonald likes this.
         
        06-25-2014, 04:09 PM
      #13
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tinyliny    
    Also, perhaps a bit more explaining why you are doing what you are doing. I am not always clear which part of the arena is the "the right thing is easy" and which part is the "the wrong thing hard". Or, if that is what you are trying to do in dealing with a herd bound horse.
    That's what I'm doing! Well the "right thing is easy" place is in the shade under the shelter. I thought it was the best place to have as our 'rest area' because it was the most comfortable on a hot, dusty day.

    Basically all I'm doing is working her when she's near the others, and resting her away. Actually I'm not 'letting her run back to them' as much as I'm directing her toward them on purpose. So going back to her friends is really my idea right from the start in this case.
    skiafoxmorgan likes this.
         
        06-25-2014, 04:11 PM
      #14
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jmike    
    what do you do when you have the opposite problem --- say another horse is sticking to the horse you are riding like glue
    I think that that would be a good problem to have. I wouldn't want the horses to argue with me on one of them, but eventually I'd like to be able to lead a packing string as well! But if I wanted to send them away, really they'll go away if I face them with the horse I'm on. Just want to be careful not to put too much pressure on as there can be a danger of kicking.

    If that wasn't enough I also have a flag.
    jmike likes this.
         
        06-25-2014, 04:13 PM
      #15
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by anndankev    
    Am I right in thinking this is to train a horse to leave/ride out from his/her group?

    She is allowed to go back to them, but when there is put to work pushing/driving one of the horses around rather than just loafing there with them (hard).

    Then when ridden away and comfortable with that gets to rest in the shade (easy).

    Afraid I only watched the first and part of the second, then a glimpse of the fourth parts. Will watch more as time allows. Am I on the right track?

    Nice group of horses.
    Thanks for the compliement. :) Yes you're onto the idea. Though I'm not really working her very hard. It doesn't actually take that much to achieve the result. More about timing!
    jmike likes this.
         
        06-25-2014, 04:52 PM
      #16
    Ale
    Yearling
    Subbing so I can watch these later!
    Ian McDonald likes this.
         
        06-25-2014, 05:37 PM
      #17
    Foal
    I know tracking will build confidence in the horse in it's self and in it's rider.

    My question is will it make the horse more aggressive towards other horses?
    jmike likes this.
         
        06-25-2014, 07:13 PM
      #18
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by jamesdean57    
    I know tracking will build confidence in the horse in it's self and in it's rider.

    My question is will it make the horse more aggressive towards other horses?
    I'm glad you asked that question because it is a concern. I don't allow my horse to abuse the other horses as I'm trying to train them through this process as well. There's also a risk of getting kicked, depending on the horses you're dealing with. So here are three things that I'm thinking of all the time while doing this:

    1. I don't allow my horse to charge up another's tailpipe at a gallop and get herself kicked, or bite the other horse. I don't allow her to give the other horse nasty looks when we're in close either because that's what leads to the biting, which could lead right back to the kicking issue again. Instead I keep her at a walk or trot while following the other horse. If the other horse feels too much pressure they only have to accelerate to the canter to take the pressure off of themselves. If she tried to bite the other horse I might give her a bump with the reins but I wouldn't allow that to happen. I'd also read the other horse's expressions to determine how close or far away I should be. If I thought one was likely to kick I'd definitely stay farther away and use a flag.

    2. The horse that's being tracked learns to find their own release through moving forward (with the saddle on), which is exactly what I'm going to need later when I ride them. That's a major way in which a lot of horses can get trained at the same time in a group like this.

    3. As long as horses are moving forward, they're not kicking. Usually. Some can kick while moving forward so be aware of that too.
         
        06-25-2014, 08:16 PM
      #19
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ian McDonald    
    I'm glad you asked that question because it is a concern. I don't allow my horse to abuse the other horses as I'm trying to train them through this process as well. There's also a risk of getting kicked, depending on the horses you're dealing with. So here are three things that I'm thinking of all the time while doing this:

    1. I don't allow my horse to charge up another's tailpipe at a gallop and get herself kicked, or bite the other horse. I don't allow her to give the other horse nasty looks when we're in close either because that's what leads to the biting, which could lead right back to the kicking issue again. Instead I keep her at a walk or trot while following the other horse. If the other horse feels too much pressure they only have to accelerate to the canter to take the pressure off of themselves. If she tried to bite the other horse I might give her a bump with the reins but I wouldn't allow that to happen. I'd also read the other horse's expressions to determine how close or far away I should be. If I thought one was likely to kick I'd definitely stay farther away and use a flag.

    2. The horse that's being tracked learns to find their own release through moving forward (with the saddle on), which is exactly what I'm going to need later when I ride them. That's a major way in which a lot of horses can get trained at the same time in a group like this.

    3. As long as horses are moving forward, they're not kicking. Usually. Some can kick while moving forward so be aware of that too.
    I am glad you elaborated on that
         
        06-25-2014, 08:22 PM
      #20
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ian McDonald    
    I'm glad you asked that question because it is a concern. I don't allow my horse to abuse the other horses as I'm trying to train them through this process as well. There's also a risk of getting kicked, depending on the horses you're dealing with. So here are three things that I'm thinking of all the time while doing this:

    1. I don't allow my horse to charge up another's tailpipe at a gallop and get herself kicked, or bite the other horse. I don't allow her to give the other horse nasty looks when we're in close either because that's what leads to the biting, which could lead right back to the kicking issue again. Instead I keep her at a walk or trot while following the other horse. If the other horse feels too much pressure they only have to accelerate to the canter to take the pressure off of themselves. If she tried to bite the other horse I might give her a bump with the reins but I wouldn't allow that to happen. I'd also read the other horse's expressions to determine how close or far away I should be. If I thought one was likely to kick I'd definitely stay farther away and use a flag.

    2. The horse that's being tracked learns to find their own release through moving forward (with the saddle on), which is exactly what I'm going to need later when I ride them. That's a major way in which a lot of horses can get trained at the same time in a group like this.

    3. As long as horses are moving forward, they're not kicking. Usually. Some can kick while moving forward so be aware of that too.
    Thanks, I've always wondered about that.
         

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