7 month old foal, need any help I can get!
   

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

7 month old foal, need any help I can get!

This is a discussion on 7 month old foal, need any help I can get! within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Training a 7 month old colt
  • introducing the crop 2 a 12 month old foal

Like Tree20Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    04-20-2012, 12:34 PM
  #1
Foal
Red face 7 month old foal, need any help I can get!

Hey Everyone!

I'm brand new to this forum. I stumbled upon it while searching for some info on how to train and care for my foal.

Gypsy is a 7 month old palomino paint mare that my dad rescued in January from a place where she wasn't being properly cared for...the vet has checked her out and she's in excellent shape. She's beautiful and very quiet...loves to be brushed and petted.

I've always been around horses (my dad also has two geldings, one since birth and an older handsome fella that we have had for years.) I was always kinda nervous around horses but my little sister was the trainer in the family. She recently moved just after we brought Gypsy home so I have taken over as her primary caregiver (besides my dad who works full time).

She's doing extremely well for what she has been through but we still haven't been putting her in the garden with the boys because she's still small and frail (and the younger of the two is not her biggest fan...). Recently I've noticed her trying to play with me like the other boys play together in the other garden. Although I don't believe she is trying to hurt me she makes me very nervous with the rearing and kicking. My dad says she's just playing and her lack of being around horses (she was taken from mom too early) is what makes her think that I'm a horse and this is proper behaviour towards me.

I've become quite close to her and I really do trust her but I don't know enough about horses, let alone a foal. I want to give her the best chance in the world to grow into a well behaved mare that I know she can be. Any help or tips at all would be much appreciated! Especially with leading and with the playing... thanks all!!
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    04-20-2012, 12:37 PM
  #2
Showing
First, you need to nip her 'playing' with you in the bud. NOW.

She's going to hurt you if you allow it to continue, plus you're not doing her any favors by not correcting her behavior. You're NOT a horse, and she needs to know she can't rear, kick, or strike at you.

She needs to be put out with the 2 geldings. They'll work out their pecking order soon enough, and then she can have appropriate playmates.
smrobs, themacpack, Kayty and 9 others like this.
     
    04-20-2012, 12:51 PM
  #3
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speed Racer    
First, you need to nip her 'playing' with you in the bud. NOW.

She's going to hurt you if you allow it to continue, plus you're not doing her any favors by not correcting her behavior. You're NOT a horse, and she needs to know she can't rear, kick, or strike at you.

She needs to be put out with the 2 geldings. They'll work out their pecking order soon enough, and then she can have appropriate playmates.

Thanks...any advice on how to stop her from trying to play with me though? I know she has to be put in with them but the last time we put them together she ended up getting hurt.
     
    04-20-2012, 12:59 PM
  #4
Showing
Correction. Immediate and to the point. If you need to, use a crop or whip. I prefer a dressage whip, as it has a longer reach.

A sharp, 'NO!' along with the physical correction should take care of it. You may have to do it more than once, depending on her temperament.

Your body language will also play a big part, as that's how horses primarily communicate. You have to be bold, confident, and make sure your voice is loud and commanding. A meek little, 'Now stop that! Noooo!' will do nothing.

She also needs the companionship of other horses because she apparently didn't have the proper socialization, moreso if she was taken from her mother too soon.

How 'hurt' did she get when you put her in with the other two? Bleeding, torn skin, etc.? Or was it just bite and kick marks? If it was the latter, then she'll live and needs to be put back out with them. Horses, especially youngsters, play rough. A few hairless places and bite marks aren't going to kill her.
     
    04-20-2012, 01:09 PM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speed Racer    
Correction. Immediate and to the point. If you need to, use a crop or whip. I prefer a dressage whip, as it has a longer reach.

A sharp, 'NO!' along with the physical correction should take care of it. You may have to do it more than once, depending on her temperament.

Your body language will also play a big part, as that's how horses primarily communicate. You have to be bold, confident, and make sure your voice is loud and commanding. A meek little, 'Now stop that! Noooo!' will do nothing.

She also needs the companionship of other horses because she apparently didn't have the proper socialization, moreso if she was taken from her mother too soon.

How 'hurt' did she get when you put her in with the other two? Bleeding, torn skin, etc.? Or was it just bite and kick marks? If it was the latter, then she'll live and needs to be put back out with them. Horses, especially youngsters, play rough. A few hairless places and bite marks aren't going to kill her.

The younger gelding (Breago) made after her as soon as she was in there on her own...she in turn ran and didn't stop until she slammed into the fence...she had a piece torn out from her back but other than that she wasn't too bad...a little shaken up.

I guess its time to try her out there again, I'm just a little nervous about it but it has to be done...the last thing I want is for her to be anti social. I will try the whip with her.
     
    04-20-2012, 01:17 PM
  #6
Trained
Don't know if this will help but, I intend to buy a weanling or yearling in a few years and I'll turn him (gelding) out with my mare. She's raised 4 foals and can discipline him much better than me. My two geldings are now 6yo and would just beat up a young horse. I'd probably turn them all out together after about a year, but they'd nose each other over the fence before them, and I've done that in the past to introduce a new herd member.
kitty3301 likes this.
     
    04-20-2012, 01:26 PM
  #7
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corporal    
Don't know if this will help but, I intend to buy a weanling or yearling in a few years and I'll turn him (gelding) out with my mare. She's raised 4 foals and can discipline him much better than me. My two geldings are now 6yo and would just beat up a young horse. I'd probably turn them all out together after about a year, but they'd nose each other over the fence before them, and I've done that in the past to introduce a new herd member.
That's a great idea...I will hunt for a mare and a willing owner...maybe that will teach her a bit about being a horse :)
     
    04-21-2012, 02:10 AM
  #8
Foal
Yep, she needs a good babysitter that will school her. My Appy was 3 months old when we got him and we couldn't put him in with our other geldings since he'd been injured when the breeder had turned him out with a bunch of yearlings that ran him through a fence. Joey's tendon sheath was sliced badly and he was convalesing for months. We bought an old, retired TB gelding to babysit him and it worked out well. The TB didn't care if we lived or died as long as he had food, but he took Joey under his wing and taught him to be polite.

Joey is 9 now and a gentleman. Good luck and like Speed Racer said, carry a dressage whip and DON'T let her treat you like a horse.
     
    04-21-2012, 09:37 PM
  #9
Yearling
The best thing for any young horse is going to be to have unlimited time and space to move and develop, within a herd. It's so essential for their physical, mental and social development. Otherwise you get (to use an extreme example) the yellow colt from the movie Buck. In less extreme examples you get a horse like one of my geldings, who though I don't know all his history I'm pretty sure he was raised in a stall. These horses are socially bankrupt and lack the necessary skills to get along with their peers.

If I had a 7-month old I would put her out somewhere and aside from necessary handling and some petting, just leave her alone. They don't really need as much in the way of real work at this age as they do time to grow up.
smrobs likes this.
     
    04-21-2012, 09:57 PM
  #10
Showing
How does the older gelding behave toward her?

I went through a similar type situation where I wanted to turn my yearling out into the big pasture with the large herd but my 2 year old kept being really aggressive and running the yearling through the fence. What I did was took the aggressive horse out of the pasture for a few days and left the yearling in with the rest of the herd. Most of what is out there is retired geldings so there are a couple that would take in after him but they wouldn't chase hard or very far. After a week or so when Taz (yearling) learned where the fences were and was more comfortable with the rest of the herd, I put Rafe (the 2 year old) back out there.

There was some initial chasing but no problems because, by that time, Taz knew where all the fences were and realized that he had 30 acres to run around on so he could avoid Rafe if he needed to.

Now, they live very companionably together.

As for the "playing", I agree with Speed Racer, you need to get that stopped now. It may be cute and funny when a baby does it...it's not so cute and funny when they are still doing it 3 years later and stand 15 hands and 1200 pounds.

When she starts to play toward you, take in after her like your younger gelding does. Make her move out of your space at a high rate of speed. Carry a lunge whip or a long lead rope with you. If she swings her butt to you at any point, give her a good solid whap with it.

Edited to add: Don't use the excuse of her past as a reason to baby her. She is not an "abused" horse or a "neglected" horse, she is just a horse and needs to be handled as such. Where so many people get into trouble is they rescue some neglected or abused animal and automatically believe that they can never ever punish bad behavior because it will "terrify" the poor animal. They want nothing more than to be "friends" with it...so they spoil it rotten to the point that the animal is unmanageable. They don't realize that they often put the poor horse in a worse situation by spoiling it than anyone ever did by abusing/neglecting it.

I've seen a lot of spoiled horses in my life....I've yet to ever see a spoiled horse that was also a happy horse.
     

Tags
foal training

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
10 month old foal, wondering when to get her feet trimmed for the first time creekgirl Hoof Care 9 03-01-2012 11:55 AM
The official when will Ace foal thread **Foal arrived!!*- Update Post #1054 Golden Horse Horse Breeding 1155 09-13-2011 10:50 PM
*Foal did not make it* - Foal due soon! Color/sex guesses? Poco1220 Horse Breeding 185 07-28-2011 07:16 PM
Fenda - Due to foal next month... TralissaAndalusians Horse Breeding 12 05-20-2011 09:22 AM
Foal, foal, cute little foal!!!!!!!! PIC OVERLOAD! DutchHorse Horse Pictures 9 07-21-2008 10:19 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:31 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0