7 year old acting like 4 yearold? (rant worning-long)
 
 

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7 year old acting like 4 yearold? (rant worning-long)

This is a discussion on 7 year old acting like 4 yearold? (rant worning-long) within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • 7 year old acts like a 4 year old
  • My 7 year old acts like a 4 year old

 
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    01-18-2010, 05:02 PM
  #1
Weanling
7 year old acting like 4 yearold? (rant worning-long)

I am starting to get really frustrated with my horse. He is a 16hh 7 year old gelding behaving like heís 4. He is behaving worse than when I first got him (he was 6).
He is getting to the point of being un-rideable . I canít even get him to walk forward to go up the hill in the paddock (this the only place I have to ride unfortunately). Its winter and the snow is crunchy, so not that great of footing, but still I was only asking for the walk. I finally get him going up the hill than coming back down he tries to canter. We go back up the hill again and he starts to roll (I barely jump off in time). This is the third time he has tried to do this in the past year. Once last winter, and another in a friends round pen. I get back on him and he starts doing all kinds of weird stuff so I figured the ride was going nowhere, and lunged him for a while.
When I got him I was a green rider, and he tried all sorts of minor things like balking, but now its turned into much more dangerous things. I guess I am just becoming very frustrated, and questioning myself as a riderÖmaybe I am too green. I feel like Iíve ruined him. It doesnít help any that he has had a few bouts of uveitis so Iíve been stressing over the treatment and the bills, he is a cribber, and sometimes I wonder what Iíve gotten myself into.
Sorry for the rat. Kudos to you if you got through it.
     
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    01-18-2010, 05:47 PM
  #2
Trained
Before it gets any worse, I would go back to basics and begin re-establishing your place in his herd. For whatever reason, he sounds like he's decided you're not in charge. If you have access to a trainer who can come over to show you some ground work basics, or even a DVD from any of the dozen TV horse trainers out there, going back to basics is probably the key here. Don't get too worked up about it. All horses have backslides and this winter has been particularly bad for horses acting out. Take a step back, pick a plan, and be very clear and consistent with your horse about what you expect from him. Good luck.
     
    01-18-2010, 05:53 PM
  #3
Weanling
What kind of basics? Like ground work? Does anybody have good roundwork exersises?
     
    01-18-2010, 06:12 PM
  #4
Foal
Yes, go back and work from the ground up. If you want a horse that has good riding manners you need to have good ground manners. You need to show him you have a bubble, word commands from the ground and he needs to know to walk when you walk and stop when you stop ect. Ect. Once you get these down pat then I would move back into the saddle doing real basic things like stopping, walking, turning and tortting. Then go back to ground and work on basics again then back to saddle. After you have done this for a month or two with no real bad mess ups. I would move on to the more challenging things.
     
    01-18-2010, 06:43 PM
  #5
Trained
If you do not know how to do ground work or round pen exercises, PLEASE find somebody knowledgeable to help you. Doing correctly involves using precise cues, correct body language, and more importantly knowing what to do if your horse decides he doesn't want to listen. Every moment you're with a horse, you either training him or untraining him. All anyone can do this forum is tell you techniques, and it might be just enough to get you into more trouble.
     
    01-18-2010, 08:09 PM
  #6
Weanling
I believe anyone can train or re-train their own horse, provided you have someone professional watching you for at least one hour a week. It is truly an indispensable service.
     
    01-18-2010, 08:13 PM
  #7
Weanling
K thanks guys. I've tooken a look through a couple of my training books and found some exersises I can do on the ground. He is usualy good about being lead, but Ill see if it helps. I have riding lesson tomorow (not on trooper) Ill ask my instructor what she thinks--she broke him in.

Any other sugestions would be great. :)
     
    01-18-2010, 08:39 PM
  #8
Foal
I know that the best way to get across to a horse is to prove that you are their dominant and you won't take any **** from them. You have to think like a horse. In the field, if a horse bites another horse on the butt, what does the other horse do? They kick out. They run the other horse off. You need to do that.

For instance, when I had my horse in cross ties, he was sooo well behaved. But when I would take the cross ties off and get ready to put on his bridle, he would try and run through me. He actually stepped on my feet a few times and has picked me up off the ground. I got tired of it. I got into his face and yelled real loud to make him back up. I did this a few times and now he is good as gold.

Also, always, always, end on a good note when you ride. If they are just being an ass the whole time, get at least one good trot out of them before you quit, or a nice slow collected walk. Don't push it, but make sure you end on a good note. You don't want your horse to think that they can get away from work by being stupid.

Let us know what your instructor says. Good luck!
     
    01-18-2010, 10:02 PM
  #9
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Seahorseys    
I believe anyone can train or re-train their own horse, provided you have someone professional watching you for at least one hour a week. It is truly an indispensable service.
I believe the opposite. If you are not a competent rider you should not be training a horse.

To the OP: Get a proffesional to give you some lessons, you are still a very green rider. When the rider doesn't have the feel to give the horse proper direction then the horse will fill in as they see fit. Some horses will figure out what you want and try thier best to do it and others will decide what they want to do regardless of you.

I could give you advice about the specific things your horse is doing but you don't have the riding background to execute them properly and may end up doing more harm than good. I know it kind of feels like a kick in the pants but I think it's good advice for you to follow.
     
    01-18-2010, 10:04 PM
  #10
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by nirvana    
k thanks guys. I've tooken a look through a couple of my training books and found some exersises I can do on the ground. He is usualy good about being lead, but Ill see if it helps. I have riding lesson tomorow (not on trooper) Ill ask my instructor what she thinks--she broke him in.

Any other sugestions would be great. :)
I didn't read this before I posted. It sounds like you've got it handled.
     

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