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Abused Horse Progress

This is a discussion on Abused Horse Progress within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        02-18-2013, 12:33 AM
      #11
    Yearling
    Just take your time and have patience with her, sounds like she just needs a little time to adjust and trust.........
         
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        02-18-2013, 12:39 AM
      #12
    Yearling
    Surprised no one has jumped in on how tired they are of "supposed abused horses"! XD Anywhoo, it is so much harder to work with horses who are messed up or afraid....it takes a lot of patience and a lot of knowing when to go SLOWER.

    (I just got chewed out by teh hubby a little bit ago for expecting too much, too soon out of my fearful mare. *sigh*). I think it is easy to get excited about some progress and push for too much too fast before the horse is comfortable.

    Wishing you luck.
         
        02-24-2013, 09:09 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Hey! So I went out there again this weekend, and the horse was SO different. You could walk up to her and touch her(you couldn't quite catch her yet though) and so I took her into the round pen, lunged her, etc.(the normal routine for any horse) So afterwards, we put a saddle on her. She did AWESOME, get rubbed it all over her, she was fine, so we put it on, she bucked like a bronc at first when we pulled her girth tight. (she's 5, and has never had a saddle on, so she did awesome!) She only bucked for a second, and then got over it and went along fine. So we took off her saddle, let her calm down a bit, then we tied some beads to her halter(we secured them, they couldn't get in her eyes, or flip up at her face, they just rattled) and she was like "whatever....." and so we put her out, and she was fine. She's come a long way, and her trust has greatly improved. I'm working with a "trainer" but I have several experienced horsemen with me.

    On a completley different note, I got Millie to jump over some overturned barrels! At first she shied away and avoided them, then she walked up to them, and she just leaped over them at a walk, and did awesome, never nocked them, moved them, or anything once she got over her fear. YAY!
         
        03-12-2013, 06:57 PM
      #14
    Foal
    Another update! We can catch the horse now, and she'll walk up to you, etc. She's found great trust with me, and her owner, and everytime she gets scared, she looks to one of us, and you can just tell how much respect she has for the few of us who are working with her. This week I walked her over some poles. She absolutley balked. She eventually came around after a lot of reassuring words, so after a few walks over a ple, we moved on, so as not to stress her out too much. We also saddled her up again. She was only a little antsy about the girth, and did great. We practiced putting weight in the stirrups, laying over her back(we had a person holding her, and I was ready to spring off her in an emergency, I was on my stomach over her back, feet out of the stirrups) we also put a bumper bit in her mouth, and she chewed it nonstop, but we're working on it.

    Again, on another note, Millie has turned out to be a great jumper! She used to be a national champion barrel racer, but lateley I've been jumping her, and she just has a natural feel for it. I think I may get her into some cross country.
         
        03-12-2013, 07:15 PM
      #15
    Foal
    When you're working with a horse it's important to know if you're simply surviving a situation. That means everything is nice and works well as long as nothing goes wrong. If you can't walk up to a horse for the first time and be fairly confident that you can just throw the saddle up on the horse and cinch the horse up and the horse will be fine with it, then it's best not to do it because the horse needs more work. If you have to tiptoe your way around and gently do things and slowly put things on, then all it takes is for you to wave a fly away or reach up and brush your hair out of your face or sneeze or something, and the horse flips out and suddenly you're in a dangerous situation. And really all it takes is one time for someone to make a little mistake like that for the horse to be even more terrified, or for someone to get seriously hurt.

    I only say it because I've been there with a very skittish Morgan who I was told was ridden every day by the owner's neighbor, but the horse was so terrified of everything that I could barely put a halter on him, let alone a blanket or even a saddle. Horses can do those things that we teach them, but if you don't address their fearful habits then those habits will stick with them even if you can exercise and ride them. So you could keep doing what you're doing with your rescue and she will learn to take a saddle and even a rider, but you're always going to have to walk on eggshells around her if you don't address the fear that she has towards everything.
         
        03-12-2013, 08:23 PM
      #16
    Foal
    She's fairly un-spookish. She's fine with touch, but strange noises amp her up a bit, but typically after a minute of calmly lunging near whatever is wrong, and some kind words, she's willing to walk past whatever it is. We do many strange things to her, like set feed pans on her back. She just stands there most of the time.
         
        03-13-2013, 06:11 PM
      #17
    Foal
    Ok, so you know how I said she chewd the bumper bit we put on her? Well, do you have any suggestions on stopping that.

    (Before any of you say it, I am working with several expeirenced horsemen, and they all agree that putting the bumper bit on her was a good idea)
         
        03-13-2013, 08:17 PM
      #18
    Showing
    Boy, this doesn't sound at all like a horse that was abused, protective of her head, but not abused.
         
        03-14-2013, 08:44 PM
      #19
    Foal
    Well, she was treated badly. IF she was ridden at all, she was jabbed with sttirrups, and most likley chased in one way or another, but this horse has not had it well.
         
        03-14-2013, 09:33 PM
      #20
    Showing
    I'm just waiting for a blow up. If this is truly an abused horse.. you'll find a button that triggers a big reaction. To me this sounds more like "going through the motions" than actually making progress.
    Breella likes this.
         

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