Administering Wormer
   

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Administering Wormer

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  • Administering horse wormer
  • Way of administering a wormer

 
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    03-02-2010, 04:38 PM
  #1
Foal
Unhappy Administering Wormer

Need some advise on how to get a Colt used to taking worm meds--tube
I have tried taking a syringe w. Molasses, but I can't get him to lick it or anything, and he still fights me when I try to hold onto his head by the halter. I fdon't really want to use the kind that you add to feed every day.
Any suggestins would be appreciated.
     
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    03-02-2010, 04:43 PM
  #2
Showing
I worm my horses every 8 weeks.

Instead of fighting with them, I dissolve the paste wormer in water and pour it over their feed.

I haven't yet had a horse refuse to eat it. Of course, I have only geldings and they live to eat!
     
    03-02-2010, 04:45 PM
  #3
Started
I have yet to meet a horse that voluntarily will suffer an overgrown syringe being stuffed into its mouth in order to inject a highy unpleasant gunge into the back of its mouth.
I give my girl some chopped apple up front - then I insert the syringe - then I give her some more chopped apple.
Then she can have a small bowl of feed which contains a good percentage of
Speedi beet.
She still doesn't forgive me, but we have got to the stage after 2 years where she will let me do it.
     
    03-02-2010, 04:47 PM
  #4
Foal
I've never tried that, never even heard of doing it that way, Speed Racer. I will try
Thanks
     
    03-02-2010, 05:06 PM
  #5
Started
I practice with an empty syringe and a pocketful of treats ahead of time, simple approach and retreat exercise. I put the syringe as close to the horse's mouth as he's willing to let me, and I hold it there until he's relaxed and not caring, and then take it away and praise. When I get it into his mouth, I give a treat and take the syringe away and praise. Usually the worst I have to deal with on D-Day is 1 or 2 approaches and retreats when they smell the medication. I always treat after I deworm to "make peace." If they're really a lot more fussy during the actual deworming I'll practice with a syringe loaded with applesauce. I also try to find the active ingredient that I need at the time in an apple flavored version. My guys seem to handle that better; I get fewer sour looks afterward.

I have really small hands, and it's hard for me to hold the tube and get the plunger down with one hand, so it's important to me to be able to take my time and not have to fight the horse to do any oral medication. My vet appreciates it, too.
     
    03-02-2010, 05:11 PM
  #6
Yearling
If all else fails, mix it with a cup or so of apple sauce. I had an old gelding that wouldn't eat it mixed with his mash. Would either eat all around it, or not touch it at all. The vet gave me the ok for the applesauce, so the next time I had to worm him, I just got a disposable bowl and mixed it. He licked the bowl clean! Absolutely NO waste.
     
    03-02-2010, 05:39 PM
  #7
Trained
First way is every one giving their horses worms?? It is not wormer it is Dewormer.

Also just deworming a horse b/c is wrong. It leads to resistance to the Dewormer. Ky is starting to have a big problem with this. I have NEVER dewormed my horses on an 8 week schedule. Also the timing you deworm your horse is also important. Testing is the best way to go although not all types of worms can be seen when testing so some just have to be done and hope for the best.

As to how to give Dewormer. There are several ways to do it. I have one old mare who will not let you touch her mouth no matter what. I simply put the dewormer on her feed and cover it. She eats it right up with no problem. With Dewormers on the market today horses seem to like the tast so it is not hart to get them to eat it like that.
     
    03-02-2010, 06:57 PM
  #8
Yearling
I agree with Nrhareiner, I only worm my horse every six months and always mix up the type of wormer. I don't know if you all have particularly virulent types of worms where you are but here they are not a big deal and certainly do not need treating every eight weeks!

It must be the way you are approaching with a syringe it sounds like you need to get better with it. I have not ever had a horse that I couldn't treat with a syringe. The trick is to make it seamless. Change nothing about the way you approach your horse, walk up to it as you normally would, as you catch the horse by the halter in the normal way, slide the syringe that is being held in the other hand up to the corner of the horses mouth, the horse doesn't even have to see it. Slide the tip of the syringe into the very corner and insert as much as you can until the horse opens it mouth then slide in deep and squeeze. Whip that syringe out of the horses mouth and then carry on as if nothing has happened. All of this takes about 10 secs.

Maybe because I don't think worming a horse is a big deal my horses never treat as such either. Also I have worked on farms for years and have drenched god knows how many head of stock. Now, drenching a half feral bull calf is a drenching drama! A horse, not so much.

I think how you approach your horse makes all the difference. I haven't even taught a horse to drench as such. Nothing beyond halter training and handling the mouth in the normal course of bridle training and general desensitizing, I have always just jammed it in their gob and expected them to take their meds like a good horse - and they always do.
     
    03-02-2010, 07:09 PM
  #9
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by kiwigirl    
I agree with Nrhareiner, I only worm my horse every six months and always mix up the type of wormer. I don't know if you all have particularly virulent types of worms where you are but here they are not a big deal and certainly do not need treating every eight weeks!

It must be the way you are approaching with a syringe it sounds like you need to get better with it. I have not ever had a horse that I couldn't treat with a syringe. The trick is to make it seamless. Change nothing about the way you approach your horse, walk up to it as you normally would, as you catch the horse by the halter in the normal way, slide the syringe that is being held in the other hand up to the corner of the horses mouth, the horse doesn't even have to see it. Slide the tip of the syringe into the very corner and insert as much as you can until the horse opens it mouth then slide in deep and squeeze. Whip that syringe out of the horses mouth and then carry on as if nothing has happened. All of this takes about 10 secs.

Maybe because I don't think worming a horse is a big deal my horses never treat as such either. Also I have worked on farms for years and have drenched god knows how many head of stock. Now, drenching a half feral bull calf is a drenching drama! A horse, not so much.

I think how you approach your horse makes all the difference. I haven't even taught a horse to drench as such. Nothing beyond halter training and handling the mouth in the normal course of bridle training and general desensitizing, I have always just jammed it in their gob and expected them to take their meds like a good horse - and they always do.
I started doing it this way with my young horses and I've never had a problem DE-worming
Vida on the other hand can not be fooled. I use an EZ-Wormer bit on her. Its cheaper and easier on me to just stick the bit in her mouth with the DE-wormer already in it.
I also have a fecal count done on one of them before I dose. You only need to do one horse in a herd. Worms are a community thing so if one has them they all will.
     
    03-02-2010, 07:32 PM
  #10
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vidaloco    
I also have a fecal count done on one of them before I dose. You only need to do one horse in a herd. Worms are a community thing so if one has them they all will.
You know this is what I had always thought also. However after going to a seminar last week that a local equine vet put on and I asked about that as I have several and usually will only check one then worm accordingly. She said that what they are finding is that SOME horses are worm bags. Her words not mine. She said that some horses with in the herd will need to be dewormed and others will not and you should only Deworm the horses that need it not all.
     

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