Advice on Handling Stallions?
 
 

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Advice on Handling Stallions?

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  • Handiling stallion
  • Stallion tips on how to handle them

 
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    04-24-2011, 05:34 PM
  #1
Foal
Question Advice on Handling Stallions?

So, I'm going to be working on a farm soon (mucking stalls, feeding, turning out, etc) and all of the horses there are well-manered mares or geldings. The owner mentioned that they have a stallion as well, but that he is easy to handle too.

Now, I've spent time around plenty of studs, all with a range of tempermants, but I have never actually handled one. I know that even the most mannered can be difficult at some point, and also to treat them as a a horse first and a stud second.

I just want some tips on handling them as a newbie. Anyone experienced with studs? I'm only tunring him out and bringing him back to the barn, nothing more and just want some advice.
     
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    04-24-2011, 05:48 PM
  #2
Cat
Green Broke
I have very limited experience with studs because any one that has come here has shortly been gelded - though they do still have some study behavior after gelding. With my limited experience I've found just being firm and not letting them get away with anything is the key.
     
    04-24-2011, 05:48 PM
  #3
Showing
Being spring even the mildest mannered studs can get a bit wound. You are absolutely right about treating him like any other horse but always be on your toes. The biggest advice I would say is to make a conscious effort to keep his attention focused on you. Should he notice mares or try to get ahead of you or pushy, immediate correction and get his mind back on the task at hand. If you should get intimidated don't let him know it. Be the alpha mare and use strong body language :) wouldn't hurt to ask his owner to do a walk-through with you and handle him a few times with them there and they should be able to guide you on his demeanor and what correction works for him should he need it.
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    04-24-2011, 05:58 PM
  #4
Foal
Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by MHFoundation Quarters    
Being spring even the mildest mannered studs can get a bit wound. You are absolutely right about treating him like any other horse but always be on your toes. The biggest advice I would say is to make a conscious effort to keep his attention focused on you. Should he notice mares or try to get ahead of you or pushy, immediate correction and get his mind back on the task at hand. If you should get intimidated don't let him know it. Be the alpha mare and use strong body language :) wouldn't hurt to ask his owner to do a walk-through with you and handle him a few times with them there and they should be able to guide you on his demeanor and what correction works for him should he need it.
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Great advice, thanks! The owner says he is very nice and doesn't normally give anyone problems, but I'd rather be safe than sorry. I'll treat him like any horse not wanting to cooporate if need be.

I've read and also have been told by horseman that if any horse tries to get ahead of you, you should stop him and make him back up, as this will get his attention back on you. I've also heard that you should never let a stud circle you. Is that true?
     
    04-24-2011, 06:27 PM
  #5
Showing
You're welcome! I prefer studs over mares or geldings any day and have the best working relationships with my guys. Backing up equals work and thinking, absolutely! Idk about the circling thing, I wouldn't allow than from any horse in hand, stallion or not unless we're talking lunging sized circle...

All 3 of our studs are very well behaved and in general one would think they were geldings if you couldn't see their equipment lol! With that being said they can act a bit scatterbrained during breeding season. Mine never do anything agressive but do let out an occasional squeal or getting a bit prancy. Squeals get a quick smack on the shoulder, dancing around gets backing up quickly, dropping when not appropriate gets a smack on the belly and a verbal "UP" cue.

I'm sure you will get along just fine. Treat him like any horse, but don't let yourself forget this time of year they are like teenage boys hitting puberty and can easily lose focus lol!
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    04-24-2011, 06:41 PM
  #6
Trained
Stallions are horses. With all horses, regardless of gender or age, when I am working at the barn and doing turn in or turn out I expect their full attention and respect. It's basic manners.

As long as he is handled consistently and you have walked with the owner for turn in and out a few times with the stud and she shows you the corrections, you should be fine, good luck!
     
    04-24-2011, 07:37 PM
  #7
Foal
Thanks for all of the advice guys! I feel a lot more confident with this information in hand! I'll be sure to take every bit of it to heart! :)
     
    04-24-2011, 07:48 PM
  #8
Foal
Walk tall... do not slouch... think and act like you are the boss. Its the vibe you give off.... Give off a nervous one and you might have problems... Give off I AM the dominant one here and you will behave then you wont have any problems.... Get what I mean? Haha
     
    04-24-2011, 10:12 PM
  #9
Showing
Treat him like any other horses; a worthy stallion will act as calm as a mare or gelding. If you sense any pushiness, be completely direct and clear on what crosses your line.
     
    04-24-2011, 10:16 PM
  #10
Super Moderator
We only have two stallions now (I have had as many as ten at one time -- both my own and customers). We just sold one of ours and he goes into quarantine next week for shipment to the UK. So, I guess we will only have one after that.

I have advanced arthritis in my hands now, so I handle them very little. I showed the one up until 3 years ago.

I have never treated them much different, but You always want to be more aware or them and their body language. I also have always made it a point to ask one to back up 10 or 12 steps when I first take them out of their stall or paddock. I never let them crowd or get even one step ahead of me. For a stallion to lower his head and back up is a real show of submission. I do not make a big 'thing' out of it unless a stud bows up and refuses to back. Then, we do not do another thing until he drops his head and backs up.

I have been sent many stallions that were less than well-mannered and I have always been more strict and less tolerant of any displays of dominance or bad manners.

The one thing you NEVER want to do with a stallion is to 'peck' or slap at one. It only makes them mad and much worse. If one needs to be gotten after, get after him severely and then leave him alone and act like nothing ever happened.

Be sure to find out if the stallion you are going to be handling is used to being handled with a chain shank over his nose or under his chin or not. Keep doing whatever he is used to. I refuse to use a whip to handle a stallion. I am not sure if I would even use one for someone else's stud. But, I don't think I would.
     

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