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Advice and Rant

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    11-11-2012, 03:48 PM
  #11
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by churumbeque    
I personally do not like the advise to chase and spank him. Lets see I think I will lovingly run up and cuddle the the person that chases and spanks me. NOT.
Do you have a pen or area that you can work him? You usually drive them away until they face you and then you back off. The reward for facing you is you quit making them run. Lots of videos and shows like join up. I don't think you need a trainer just stick it out.
No one said they would "lovingly and cuddle" the person that chases and spanks them......but if he kept turning his butt to her should she just ignore that? That is disrespect to her from the horse, telling her to get lost.

Joining up is great but if the horse persists on giving you the butt I do think they should be spanked for that. If they walk away, you turn away and stop....I do know how to do join up. But when a 1,000lb. Animal keeps turning it's butt to me I will not stand there and let that be ok....
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    11-11-2012, 03:51 PM
  #12
Super Moderator
It is a little confusing with two different threads about the same thing.

I will just add here that I never chase a weanling or even a yearling. I do not longe them or round-pen them. I do not even spank them unless they are already spoiled and very aggressive. It is very natural for a weanling to turn its butt to someone. They have to be taught what to do and how to interact with a human leader. If a person just starts pulling and pushing them around and removing all pressure when they stand up there and behave, they figure out very quickly how to behave around their human leader.

I also do not think a good diet contributes to babies being obnoxious. I think they need a good diet to grow and be healthy. It is not at all like an older mature horse. Babies' requirements are much greater. Just be sure that a mini is not 'over-fed' by insuring that amounts match body weight. This obviously is not a 400# QH foal.

Since this weanling is 'looking grumpy', I 'read' this to understand that he is already laying his ears back at his handler. Everything in these posts tells me that, while the OP has the very best of intentions, you are trying to be his friend and not his leader. Any age horse really needs a strong, 'no nonsense' leader. It also helps a lot if they are put in with older more dominant horses. They can teach the young ones a lot about behavior and manners.

And Yes!. You will get a lot of conflicting opinions here and elsewhere. You best bet would be to listen to someone local that has raised many well-mannered foals that are 'user friendly' and do not have health issues. Then stick with that one program. I'll back out of this now.
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    11-11-2012, 04:10 PM
  #13
Green Broke
If a horse is laying ears back at me, turning butt and looking like he is going to kick and looking like he might come after me I can tell you that isn't happening. That is a horse that I go in the paddock with a lunge whip which I will use smartly if the horse backs up to me to kick or lays ears back and threatens me or tries to run me down.

As long as the behavior is good, the whip stays low and pointed at the ground. The minute there is any crap the whip comes up and I will use it. The instant the horse's ears come forward and the threats cease, the whip goes down and is pointed at the ground.

Training an animal is all about pressure and release of pressure. That sounds simple enough but it also entails being able to read the horse and having perfect timing.

I agree with Cherie.. in fact I usually agree with Cherie. You are trying to be the horse's friend. Horses are not dogs.. and it just does not work like that. Watch them interact in a herd and you will see how pressure works for horse-horse communication. It works the same for human-horse communication.

If you are open to all of this I can tell you that you are at the beginning of a fascinating journey.
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    11-11-2012, 04:54 PM
  #14
Foal
Hes never had his ears back at me.

Today I did as suggested and kept at him until he was tired of running back and forth and let me halter him. We went for a walk, he picked up his feet for cleaning as usual as if nothing had even happened. He's great on the rope - absolutely no issues when we go for a walk. Thanks for the help!
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    11-11-2012, 05:23 PM
  #15
Weanling
I only had horses as a small child and my parents did all the feeding and caring for them. I knew I wanted another horse some time in life when the time was right. When I purchased Phar Lap the guy threw in Phar Lap's 27 year old mom (Shadow) and his donkey. Shadow was very overweight and I was overwhelmed as to what to do but I knew I couldn't leave her there. Coming here and getting advice was the BEST thing I ever did. There were seriously days I would just about cry because I was so overwhelmed with the whole situation. I wanted to give up and get rid of all three because Phar Lap was not the dead broke horse he was supposed to be. Shadow was old and underweight and I thought for sure I was going to go to jail because of her condition if somebody saw her. The donkey was wild! But I stuck with it and I am sooooo glad I did because now we are riding all three and they are the best horses I could have ever asked for. Shadow was definitely a diamond in the rough and I don't think that guy knew what he had. That girl is AMAZING! Anyway, I am rambling now and I think my point is that asking for help and finally getting good advice is definitely a confidence builder. And sticking with the pony and seeing what you can actually do is a great feeling. I look forward to seeing what you can accomplish.
     
    11-11-2012, 05:30 PM
  #16
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by alexis rose    
I only had horses as a small child and my parents did all the feeding and caring for them. I knew I wanted another horse some time in life when the time was right. When I purchased Phar Lap the guy threw in Phar Lap's 27 year old mom (Shadow) and his donkey. Shadow was very overweight and I was overwhelmed as to what to do but I knew I couldn't leave her there. Coming here and getting advice was the BEST thing I ever did. There were seriously days I would just about cry because I was so overwhelmed with the whole situation. I wanted to give up and get rid of all three because Phar Lap was not the dead broke horse he was supposed to be. Shadow was old and underweight and I thought for sure I was going to go to jail because of her condition if somebody saw her. The donkey was wild! But I stuck with it and I am sooooo glad I did because now we are riding all three and they are the best horses I could have ever asked for. Shadow was definitely a diamond in the rough and I don't think that guy knew what he had. That girl is AMAZING! Anyway, I am rambling now and I think my point is that asking for help and finally getting good advice is definitely a confidence builder. And sticking with the pony and seeing what you can actually do is a great feeling. I look forward to seeing what you can accomplish.

Thank you!! I started my day with zero confidence and after some of these replies I went out - got it done and feel so much better about it. Stories like yours are a big help.
     
    11-11-2012, 05:40 PM
  #17
Weanling
I like this video. A moody mare who puts her butt in this guy's face and he drives her off. It's the basic concept, "make the right thing easy, the wrong thing difficult." Simple respect lessons.

     
    11-11-2012, 06:05 PM
  #18
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by steedaunh32    
I like this video. A moody mare who puts her butt in this guy's face and he drives her off. It's the basic concept, "make the right thing easy, the wrong thing difficult." Simple respect lessons.

How to correct a horse who is disrespectful, food protective or ear pinning - Rick Gore Horsemanship - YouTube
Excellent! Thanks for this. This is exactly what I did this afternoon. My horse doesnt pin his ears, or throw his head up like that. He runs and raises his tail a bit, more tosses his head down and level rather that back though, which also makes me feel better.
     
    11-11-2012, 06:10 PM
  #19
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by eavinet    
Excellent! Thanks for this. This is exactly what I did this afternoon. My horse doesnt pin his ears, or throw his head up like that. He runs and raises his tail a bit, more tosses his head down and level rather that back though, which also makes me feel better.
That's certainly a good thing he doesn't exhibit some of those behaviors and sounds like you did a great job making corrections. All it takes sometimes is an easier way of explaining or a simple video that shows how just a few minutes can change their thinking. There's always a line between horses getting out some youthful spunk/energy and behavioral issues, but disrespect is obvious, something that needs immediate correcting, but mainly something that good training can usually avoid altogether.
     
    11-11-2012, 06:17 PM
  #20
Green Broke
Has he been gelded?

The basic premise is to make the wrong thing hard work or unpleasant(IOW's he does the wrong thing he must move his feetand if it is really wrong he will get a taste of the lunge whip). He does the right thing and you back off, lower the whip and he can stop moving his feet.

It is really quite simplistic in theory (but not so simplistic in practice as timing is everything).
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