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Afraid of being saddled

This is a discussion on Afraid of being saddled within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

     
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        03-28-2011, 10:45 AM
      #21
    Foal
    Unfortunately in my case, the guy lives in Nevada (I'm in Montana), but when I got him I did notice he did the same thing when they saddled him. He was in a really small area with a very low roof when I observed it, so I guess I assumed it was because of that. Should have asked... :( But like I said, if this is the worst problem he has, then I'm still very happy with him. He's quite new to me, so I'm sure I'll find some other things that need some fine-tuning. I have a rescue horse in training right now, and when he is out, then I may take this new one and have him evaluated and fine-tuned, along with myself getting some much needed lessons.
         
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        03-28-2011, 10:52 AM
      #22
    mls
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Darla719    
    but when I got him I did notice he did the same thing when they saddled him.
    Did they place the saddle on him or throw it on him?
         
        03-28-2011, 11:01 AM
      #23
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mls    
    Equilove and Darla - since the horses are fairly new to you - think back to watching the previous owner saddle the horse - what did they do/not do differently? Or did the horse react the same way?
    I never had the previous owner saddle Sav. After we loaded her into the trailer he told me, verbatim: "Now... when you put the saddle on her for the first time, it will take some... finesse." I didn't think anything of it because I was buying her as a project, problems were to be expected. Quite frankly I didn't care what kind of training she'd had... the fact she was even considered "green broke" was nice in my eyes. I would have still bought her regardless of her past training, because I was just starting her over anyway.
         
        03-28-2011, 11:03 AM
      #24
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mls    
    Did they place the saddle on him or throw it on him?
    Its funny you mention that because I did notice they 'threw' it on him, saddle with pad at the same time, and were not very gentle.
         
        03-28-2011, 12:18 PM
      #25
    Super Moderator
    I guess I look at things a lot different that one person with one horse does.

    Frankly, I don't care how the last person that had a horse did something. I don't care if they set or threw a saddle on. I don't care if the horse stood like a well mannered horse should for either approach or if he freaked out and tried to run off. What he did before is not going to influence what he is going to learn in my care.

    I just want to turn out a horse that any dummy can saddle, bridle and ride anywhere. I don't turn out horses with a list or a resume. A well trained horse just stands there and does what he is supposed to do, no matter how he is approached. Anything less -- well he needs to be worked on and taught.

    I will tie a new horse up to see if he ties well. If he does, I go to grooming and saddling. I always have a second lead attached so a new one cannot run past me or turn and kick me. (Its happened)

    Then, I approach with a lightweight saddle. I work on this until he stands good to be saddled.

    I take each step -- one at a time -- and stop and work on the ones that need to be worked on. We go as far as we can each day and always stop when the last task has been accomplished to my satisfaction.

    I learned a long time ago that people lie about their horses when they bring them to a trainer. They either misrepresent the problems or are too dumb to know they are problems or just just tell you a total lie to get you to take their horse. (Like you aren't going to know once you have it.)

    I have had horses attack me, try to kick or paw me, run over me, rear up and throw themselves over, buck like a PRCA rodeo bronc and about anything else a spoiled horse can do, so I treat them all like they might do any of the above and just go from there. A horse's history is just that --- HISTORY. It does not shape its future if a person is competent. It is just a starting place.
         
        03-28-2011, 02:58 PM
      #26
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cherie    
    I guess I look at things a lot different that one person with one horse does.

    Frankly, I don't care how the last person that had a horse did something. I don't care if they set or threw a saddle on. I don't care if the horse stood like a well mannered horse should for either approach or if he freaked out and tried to run off. What he did before is not going to influence what he is going to learn in my care.

    I just want to turn out a horse that any dummy can saddle, bridle and ride anywhere. I don't turn out horses with a list or a resume. A well trained horse just stands there and does what he is supposed to do, no matter how he is approached. Anything less -- well he needs to be worked on and taught.

    I will tie a new horse up to see if he ties well. If he does, I go to grooming and saddling. I always have a second lead attached so a new one cannot run past me or turn and kick me. (Its happened)

    Then, I approach with a lightweight saddle. I work on this until he stands good to be saddled.

    I take each step -- one at a time -- and stop and work on the ones that need to be worked on. We go as far as we can each day and always stop when the last task has been accomplished to my satisfaction.

    I learned a long time ago that people lie about their horses when they bring them to a trainer. They either misrepresent the problems or are too dumb to know they are problems or just just tell you a total lie to get you to take their horse. (Like you aren't going to know once you have it.)

    I have had horses attack me, try to kick or paw me, run over me, rear up and throw themselves over, buck like a PRCA rodeo bronc and about anything else a spoiled horse can do, so I treat them all like they might do any of the above and just go from there. A horse's history is just that --- HISTORY. It does not shape its future if a person is competent. It is just a starting place.
    I didn't bother having the previous owners saddle/ride Sav before I bought her, since I knew she was green amd because I knew I'd be starting over anyway... I thought I mentioned that.
         
        03-29-2011, 10:06 AM
      #27
    Foal
    Here's what I when I have a saddling problem with a broke horse. Take him/her to a large at min. 30 ft. Pen. A round pen is ideal. Free lunge him and teach him to buddy up/connect with you. That the best place to be is in the middle with you were he doesn't have to work. If he offers to leave let him leave and make him work. After a few times he wont offer to leave. Then get the saddle pad and repeat. Once he gets where you can toss the saddle pad on him and he doesn't think about leaving get the saddle. Go slow! You don't want him to even think about leaving if he's only 1/2 the way cinched up! Once you can throw the saddle up on this back and he remains calm slowly start to reach under and get the latigo and put through the cinch. If he gets nervous put it down and try again. Basically you are desentitizing your horse to the saddle when you are for certain he is not going to leave cinch him all the way up. This has worked for me every time i've used it. It also teaches him to trust you.
         
        03-29-2011, 10:47 AM
      #28
    mls
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cherie    
    I guess I look at things a lot different that one person with one horse does.

    Frankly, I don't care how the last person that had a horse did something. I don't care if they set or threw a saddle on. I don't care if the horse stood like a well mannered horse should for either approach or if he freaked out and tried to run off. What he did before is not going to influence what he is going to learn in my care.

    I have had horses attack me, try to kick or paw me, run over me, rear up and throw themselves over, buck like a PRCA rodeo bronc and about anything else a spoiled horse can do, so I treat them all like they might do any of the above and just go from there. A horse's history is just that --- HISTORY. It does not shape its future if a person is competent. It is just a starting place.
    Oh it most certainly influences what the horse will learn when I handle it. In the case of throwing a saddle on or cinching too tight too quickly, there is some untraining that needs to be accomplished.

    Horses never forget - but they do forgive. Even though the issue was not my fault, I work to get the horse to forgive the action - and thus gain their cooperation and respect.

    Knowing why helps to proceed more quickly than playing guessing games. That is why I ask.
         
        03-29-2011, 12:15 PM
      #29
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Oh it most certainly influences what the horse will learn when I handle it.
    Of course it will influence what and how a horse learns and how I will proceed with said horse. I just don't need the previous owner to tell me a story. The horse will tell me the truth. That is why I do not care what kind of story an old owner tells me. The horses do not lie. They are more easily read than a book and they are more honest than an owner or seller.
         
        03-29-2011, 02:46 PM
      #30
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cherie    
    Of course it will influence what and how a horse learns and how I will proceed with said horse. I just don't need the previous owner to tell me a story. The horse will tell me the truth. That is why I do not care what kind of story an old owner tells me. The horses do not lie. They are more easily read than a book and they are more honest than an owner or seller.
    Well, right now my horse isn't telling me anything except that she doesn't want to be saddled. Obviously the previous owners knew she was difficult to saddle and relayed that message obscurely to me, so I had to figure out to what extent on my own.

    We don't have a roundpen but I'd like to find a way to try some form of the join-up method that someone described. We've got some panels I could move around to make a small roundpen I suppose. Maybe I can incorporate the touch-it game and set a cookie on top of a few saddles and put them pommel-down in an area and send her to each saddle, so she's curious about the saddles or something. Thanks for the advice all!
         

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