Aggressive Arabian Mare
   

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Aggressive Arabian Mare

This is a discussion on Aggressive Arabian Mare within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Parelli aggressive horse
  • Horse no longer in pain still showing agression when ridden

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    01-01-2013, 09:58 PM
  #1
Foal
Aggressive Arabian Mare

6 years ago, I got my first horse, Destinii. She was a lesson horse and for the first 4 or 5 years, she was great, very little attitude. Just recently, when she moved into another barn with new horses, she became very aggressive. I have done ground training with her, and she walks very obediently, follows me wherever, and she loves parelli. But she is aggressive in the pasture and hasn't bitten yet, but she tosses her head and snaps. I have tried new things with her, like riding without saddle or bridle, but she gives me 'tude and bucks and tosses her head and tries to bite my boots when I move my feet forward to tell her to back up. Also note she is rarely ridden and she used to be ridden regularly. She might be getting spoiled, but can that really make a horse aggressive? I want her to enjoy my presence and have a partnership with her.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    01-01-2013, 11:14 PM
  #2
Yearling
She doesn't respect you, when you go out into the pasture she is trying to put you in the pecking order by misbehaving.....I would suggest doing ground work with her to get her respect.
     
    01-01-2013, 11:17 PM
  #3
Green Broke
Yes spoiling can make a horse aggressive. No more treats, no more babying when she comes at you raise hell. Yell jump carry a crop and make her wish she never even considered coming at you. She seems like one who needs constant interaction and stimulation.
     
    01-01-2013, 11:42 PM
  #4
Super Moderator
Yes. She probably would rather spend her time with the other horses in the pasture, so she resents you as an interruption.

You have to become a lot more important to her, more important than the pasture or the others. So, work her more! And give her less time to think about things away from you. If you do Parelli, then you'd want to be sure you are getting a good response to what you are asking. And may speed things up a bit. She might need a bit of a shake up.
     
    01-02-2013, 08:49 AM
  #5
Weanling
First off I rule out pain, I don't care if the horse is out to pasture or in a barn. Many types of pain show up only in some cases. I new of a horse once that every time you put her out to pasture or someplace big where she could run. So would come back mean, not just to me but to other horses as well. Soon after we could out that she had bone spurs in her legs due to all the running the horses did. She was showing aggression due to being in pain.
     
    01-02-2013, 08:56 AM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Freemare    
First off I rule out pain, I don't care if the horse is out to pasture or in a barn. Many types of pain show up only in some cases. I new of a horse once that every time you put her out to pasture or someplace big where she could run. So would come back mean, not just to me but to other horses as well. Soon after we could out that she had bone spurs in her legs due to all the running the horses did. She was showing aggression due to being in pain.
I agree! We had a mare that was sweet from the ground but would flip out when you tried to ride her. Turns out she had a growth on her spine (not visible to eye).

I personally would also spend $75 and have her saddle custom fitted. It could be as simple as something pinches and she's lashing out at horses and people.
Posted via Mobile Device
     
    01-02-2013, 09:17 AM
  #7
Super Moderator
I would also rule out pain issues - and ask your vet about the possibility that she may have an ovarian tumour - I've attached a link that might help - or stomach ulcers due to the move and changes
Equine ovarian tumors - DVM
The fact that you've moved her into a herd situation could be the problem. We all think of it as 'natural' so ideal when in fact for a horse not used to living like it it can be anything but natural and very stressful until they adjust and get accepted
The other thing to consider is that if a horse gets all it needs by way of stimulation from the herd it has less need for the human in its life so you have to make being with you better than being with them - but force feeding treats is not the answer - treats are OK to reward good behaviour or in a teaching situation but not as a bribe.
Man took horses out of the herd to make them better companions and work animals - turnout is important but has to be balanced with human contact and attention
     

Tags
aggressive, arabian, mare, parelli, spoiled

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
aggressive mare sharing paddock with my mare, please help! tarastone Horse Training 12 01-02-2013 12:45 PM
Aggressive Mare! jkm06 Horse Talk 4 12-14-2012 09:12 AM
Aggressive mare morganh Horse Training 1 11-24-2012 10:14 PM
Aggressive mare equinluvr Horse Training 2 10-21-2011 05:38 PM
Help w/ aggressive mare rausrus Horse Health 3 07-12-2008 02:08 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:27 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0