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Aggressive yearling

This is a discussion on Aggressive yearling within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Tips for aggressive yearling colts
  • What to do with an excitable yearling when leading

 
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    01-04-2010, 12:46 PM
  #11
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by iridehorses    
Most.
I was giving the stallions the benefit of the doubt lol. But yes, most. Unless there are good reasons for them to have them,of which breeding is the only one, and not many make those standards.... they don't need them...
     
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    01-04-2010, 01:22 PM
  #12
Weanling
Once he's gelded hopefully some of this behavior will go away or at least be more manageable. As for leading make (as other have posted) just make him move be it right or left or whatever, even make him work in some way so that going where you asked first off was less work than fighting you. He's young and testing you, this is where the real work comes in and you HAVE to be consistent and assertive letting him know that your the boss and he's not. Good luck and keep those feet and mind moving.
     
    01-04-2010, 01:42 PM
  #13
mls
Trained
Geld him - ASAP. Our policy is no boarded stallions over one year of age. However, I've required anyone with a studdy colt under a year to geld or leave. Not worth the potential injuries to any one on my property.

I will disagree that horses don't hold grudges. They most certainly do remember circumstances and gain or lose respect for the human.
     
    01-04-2010, 01:48 PM
  #14
Foal
There are plenty of well bred studs that have been gelded due to bad attitude. I am not saying a professional could not turn them around, but you have already stated you are not able to handle him. All the responses this horse has given you are bold and plain, he will hurt you and not feel bad in the morning. Either get him to someone that can correct this or geld him before he puts you or someone else in the hospital. Your life and limb if far more valuable than this horse will ever be. If gelding does not help, get a professional or get a new horse. Again, your safety comes above any horse and be realistic, is this the right horse for you? Why do you have a horse? Let that answer guide your decisions.
     
    01-04-2010, 01:56 PM
  #15
Foal
I'm not going to say much, coz i'm no expert, but I have handled a few colts, and i've learned that you need to try and think forward to what might happen before it happens, never let him take you by surprise, as he's a youngster, for instance when you're leading him, he might be walking along all nice and happy, and then suddenly rear up or something the complete opposite, you never know with youngsters, so you need to expect the unexpected! Another thing i've learned is that however scared he's making you, never, ever, ever let on to him that you are, coz that'll make it 50 times worse. You could be p*ssing your pants you're that scared, but you've got to kid him into thinking you're not intimidated by him. I'm not saying that your not confident or anything, I just know how it is when these stupid youngsters get all cocky! Just my two pennies worth, haha, put me right if i'm wrong!
     
    01-04-2010, 01:57 PM
  #16
Foal
When I was an inexperienced horse owner, I had a 2 year old stud colt. That colt did not respect me at all, would come after me, and I had no idea how to assert myself. One day he bit me so badly in the chest that he ripped my shirt off and I had to go to the hospital. From how things are going, you are in for this or worse if you don't do something now. This situation has to do with both his age and his testosterone. It will definitely help to get him gelded, and you will probably see a difference within the first couple of days because of his age. Right now, if you are going to handle him, make sure you have a stud chain and a dressage whip, and possibly a dull nail or something that if he REALLY invades your space or tries to shoulder you, as young colts often do, he can "run into" the nail. When he refuses to walk forward, you crank that stud chain and tell him to back up and get him out of your space. Until he walks forward, you bring the pain and get him out of your space. IF he comes at you, you go for him with that dressage whip and crank him with that chain. When he comes at you, if you back up or try to get away, you are giving in. Just being able to stand your ground will make him respect you that much more. He will no he is not allowed to invade your space, and that will make him safe to handle. If you don't stop this now, he will probably start standing up on you and trying to get away, and let me tell you, that is not what you want!

Just know that there is so much to learn from this experience. I am very confidant at handling stallions now, and I can do it without artificial aids. Just do what you can and don't get discouraged! You CAN and WILL fix this situation.
     
    01-04-2010, 01:59 PM
  #17
Weanling
Geld him. Like Allison said, the hormones will eventually work themselves out of his system. It make take a few months, but you WILL see a difference. But the longer you wait, the longer it's going to be before you see that difference.
     
    01-04-2010, 02:00 PM
  #18
Showing
Here are my questions, and some answers:

1) Stalling an already excitable horse is not the answer - this will lead to more pent-up energy that will need an outlet... I.e. Through misbehaving. If he is disrespecting your electric fence, it's time to figure out a better way of containing him - either with a stronger voltage, or a different type of fencing - I do NOT recommend wire for a horse that is disrespecting a fence; a plank-type fence would probably be best.

2) If you are not comfortable handling this horse, hire a professional. The more this horse gets away with now, the pushier he's going to get... and he's going to get bigger. The last thing you want is a horse that thinks he can dominate humans. Please do not allow this to happen. In today's market, where nice horses are selling a dime a dozen, aggressive horses like what you are describing in your OP are not going to good homes, they are ending up in a meat pen.

3) What does he get for feed?

     
    01-04-2010, 02:04 PM
  #19
Yearling
JDI is teh awesome.

I'm from FiSH.
     
    01-04-2010, 02:07 PM
  #20
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by laceyf53    
if you are going to handle him, make sure you have a stud chain and a dressage whip, and possibly a dull nail or something that if he REALLY invades your space or tries to shoulder you, as young colts often do, he can "run into" the nail.
WHAT?!?!


Quote:
Originally Posted by laceyf53    
When he refuses to walk forward, you crank that stud chain and tell him to back up and get him out of your space. Until he walks forward, you bring the pain and get him out of your space. IF he comes at you, you go for him with that dressage whip and crank him with that chain. When he comes at you, if you back up or try to get away, you are giving in. Just being able to stand your ground will make him respect you that much more. He will no he is not allowed to invade your space, and that will make him safe to handle.
you need to learn how "tools" actually should be used. You don't CRANK on stud chains. They are there to let the horse feel pressure when they push against them and therefore they do not like the feeling and stop.

And im sorry but this NEVER means the horse is "safe" to handle. What it can mean is they are easier, but not safe. He also will look for a time that you JUST HAPPEN to let your guard down because you "think" he's safe. Then you can feel how safe he is.
     

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