Agressive Stallion REFUSED to lay down *LONG* - Page 10
 
 

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Agressive Stallion REFUSED to lay down *LONG*

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        03-14-2013, 05:47 AM
      #91
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by 6gun Kid    
    (see honey I do listen).
    Good boy!
    palogal likes this.
         
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        03-14-2013, 05:49 AM
      #92
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by TheAQHAGirl    
    Show them this video and plain that if he was 'stud worthy' he wouldn't be in this position.

    [url]https:/www.youtube.com/watch?v=D7FMuIwI8vUl]



    I'd lie to see how this ends up...Keep us up to date! (:


    l

    That exact thing thing happened to me, except he grabbed me by my breast. I wanted to put a bullet through his head, but I watched someone else handle it. Stud is a little head shy now, but does not bite
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        03-14-2013, 10:23 AM
      #93
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by loosie    
    Good boy!

    Yup :) (I'm his wife)
    loosie, texasgal, nvr2many and 4 others like this.
         
        03-18-2013, 05:07 PM
      #94
    Weanling
    Sorry haven't been here in a few days been very busy around here. Foaling season is fast approaching and I also professionally show dogs and we were off at shows this last weekend.


    I've read each and every response here and I KNOW that there is a lot of input/personal views etc where we will never agree on. We can all only do what we feel is best in each personal situation and with our expertise level.


    Here are some responses to comments that stuck out to me...

    1. To the person who vehemently disagreed with my methods

    you are not me. You are not in my situation and you are not putting yourself in this particular situation. I have experience with stallions, this method, and it works for me. I think when people think of laying a horse down they think of incredible cruelty to an animal and when done properly it is just the opposite. It is a very safe way to get an aggressive and dangerous animal to learn that even though he is 1000lbs plus... he cannot stop you. Agree or not. This is my charge in my training program.

    2. To the person who suggested treating for unwanted behaviors...

    This is quite honestly how this horse got in this situation. Stallions are DIFFERENT animals than mares and geldings. They must live in a nothing in life is free environment and you can never let your guard down around them. Many don't mean to be dangerous they are thinking with their "other" brains.. but you getting inbetween them and what they want will get you hurt if you let your guard down.

    3. Someone mentioned that by me losing that I got nowhere with him

    I disagree. He didn't know what I wanted from him so there was no reward for any of the behavior. I DID make a baby step with him. While I might not of got the desired action from this session I did get the desired mind change. He gave up a small fight going into the stall after our session but not nearly the full blown out trying to strike, kick and rear at me we were previously having with him. He is now successfully going in and out of his stall calmly.

    4. To the person who said that by him being in a full all out sweat etc that he was scared and trying to get away.

    I know what a horse looks like when its scared.. its whites show it acts nervous etc. This horse has no fear. That is why he was/is in this situation. He was quite frankly tired of putting up a fight.


    I have personally seen firsthand animals that have "blood in their eyes" they are people killers. If you have ever met one you know what I mean....and they are SCARY AS HELL!
    This particular horse is NOT one of those. He is quite frankly a bratty 3 year old stallion who has grown up getting his way for the last three years and is used to it by now. This has made him dangerous.. and this has taught him that being aggressive has gotten him wherever he wants to go when he wants to do it.




    Now for the update!
    I gave him the day after our session off. We both needed a rest! But we went back to work the next day. He calmly is letting me put on his halter. He walks in and out of his stall. He is cross tying calmly and tying calmly.

    He is acting like a NORMAL HORSE! Still a bit study when he sees other horses but that's to be expected from a young stallion in spring. I've been correcting the behavior and he is responding to me.

    He yields to me. Gives me space and has been working well on the lounge line. I put a bareback pad with girth on him today for the first time and he took it like I would expect any other horse. He is a little girthy but I think that will get better with time.

    He still has quite a bit of ground work to go before we will be "hopping on his back" but overall that one session has really changed the mindset of this boy. I do not plan on going back to it again unless he reverts back to his previous bad boy attitude. I'll be sharing a video and uploading a photo of him today working for you all to enjoy :)
    loosie, smrobs, Sharpie and 7 others like this.
         
        03-18-2013, 05:25 PM
      #95
    Weanling
    A photo of him after working.

    doubleopi, EmilyJoy and DimSum like this.
         
        03-18-2013, 05:31 PM
      #96
    Weanling
    DimSum and Spotted like this.
         
        03-18-2013, 05:34 PM
      #97
    Weanling
    Pardon all the horses squealing LOL! Whenever im in the barn they always want fed pigs!


    This is such huge progress for him... prior to our lay down exercise anytime he heard a mare whinny he would slam over to the gate and try to bust through .His mind is in the work now and he is really coming along

    He was a little bit spunky. We had JUST started lounging :)
         
        03-18-2013, 05:38 PM
      #98
    Foal
    Awesome!! I've been a little stunned by that too, you work a horse one day and he's just fighting you the whole time and you think "how can I ever train this guy," it takes him forever to learn things and you leave at the end of the session thinking you're going to have an even harder time the next time...

    Then the next day you go back out and he does everything PERFECTLY. It makes you wonder if he's just pulling your leg or something. But really, sometimes it helps to give horses a day or two off after they've had a few sessions to let the training sink in. Maybe it would help him even better if you trained him every other day for like 30 minutes since he seems to enjoy the time off, he's probably just one of those horses that needs some time to let it sink in.
         
        03-18-2013, 05:51 PM
      #99
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Laffeetaffee    
    Awesome!! I've been a little stunned by that too, you work a horse one day and he's just fighting you the whole time and you think "how can I ever train this guy," it takes him forever to learn things and you leave at the end of the session thinking you're going to have an even harder time the next time...

    Then the next day you go back out and he does everything PERFECTLY. It makes you wonder if he's just pulling your leg or something. But really, sometimes it helps to give horses a day or two off after they've had a few sessions to let the training sink in. Maybe it would help him even better if you trained him every other day for like 30 minutes since he seems to enjoy the time off, he's probably just one of those horses that needs some time to let it sink in.

    I normally don't do long sessions with horses. It makes them hate it. The reason the "laying down" session was so long is that is literally how long it took him before he stopped fighting me. In those kind of situations we go over our allotted time.

    I also try to end every session on a good note. If a horse continuously doesn't get something.. I don't stop with that bad behavior I end with something he does well and than pat him. It happens. Every session is not a success. I do limit my sessions to 30 minutes when starting horses.
    loosie likes this.
         
        03-18-2013, 11:44 PM
      #100
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GhostwindAppaloosa    
    1. To the person who vehemently disagreed with my methods

    you are not me. You are not in my situation and you are not putting yourself in this particular situation. I have experience with stallions, this method, and it works for me. I think when people think of laying a horse down they think of incredible cruelty to an animal and when done properly it is just the opposite.
    As there were a few who didn't appear to agree with how it sounded, me being one of them, not sure who this is directed to, but on my part at least... I appreciate that we all have different experiences & attitudes, not to mention I wasn't there to actually know the situation & it could have been a lot different to my perception from your post It's just something that IMO I felt strongly about & sounded like I would have done quite differently myself, on a number of levels. Personally, I understand and am not against the practice of laying a horse like this down, it was the way you described the situation.

    Quote:
    2. To the person who suggested treating for unwanted behaviors...

    This is quite honestly how this horse got in this situation. Stallions are DIFFERENT animals than mares and geldings. They must live in a nothing in life is free environment
    Didn't read that bit but I suspect that it may have been mistaken. Absolutely & positively would be careful NEVER to treat(I gather meaning reward) unwanted behaviour, not just with a stallion. I think 'nothing in life is free' may not be absolutely necessary for some personalities, but is a valuable principle to keep in mind training any animal. They need to learn clearly & consistently what behaviour works for them & what doesn't... preferably they learn the behaviours that work are those the handler wants!

    Quote:
    He still has quite a bit of ground work to go before we will be "hopping on his back" but overall that one session has really changed the mindset of this boy. I do not plan on going back to it again unless he reverts back to his previous bad boy attitude. I'll be sharing a video and uploading a photo of him today working for you all to enjoy :)
    Excellent news!
         

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