Agressive Stallion REFUSED to lay down *LONG* - Page 12
 
 

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Agressive Stallion REFUSED to lay down *LONG*

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  • Desensitise horse to aerosol sprays

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    03-20-2013, 11:15 PM
  #111
Green Broke
Glad it's going well.

I second the advice to remain on your guard. Some horses go into a little honeymoon period and after that wears off, will try something. Not as bad, but still can foul you up.
apachiedragon likes this.
     
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    03-21-2013, 01:24 PM
  #112
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
^Perhaps if he's been a pet he'd never encountered any 'resistance' before... yeah, he'd have been a fun character for a farrier!
supposedly he stands for the farrier. I don't believe it
     
    03-21-2013, 01:24 PM
  #113
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by boots    
Glad it's going well.

I second the advice to remain on your guard. Some horses go into a little honeymoon period and after that wears off, will try something. Not as bad, but still can foul you up.
I never let my guard down around horses! Even one I have owned and loved for 17 years.
Elana likes this.
     
    03-22-2013, 01:23 AM
  #114
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by GhostwindAppaloosa    
I never let my guard down around horses! Even one I have owned and loved for 17 years.
Oh you can trust & rely on any horse 100%! To behave like a horse & some horses are just more 'horsey' than others!
     
    03-22-2013, 08:27 AM
  #115
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
Oh you can trust & rely on any horse 100%! To behave like a horse & some horses are just more 'horsey' than others!
Loosie - I think you meant you "can't" trust....
     
    03-22-2013, 12:34 PM
  #116
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by GhostwindAppaloosa    
LMFAO! You know they always do! Honestly unless a horse has amazing ground manners I don't even GET ON THEM in the first 30 days. And I have YET to get a horse in with great ground manners.
You'll find its because those with great ground manners are generaly the product of people who know what they are doing and generaly break them themselves.

However My lad Reeco has brilliant ground manners, do anything you like with him on the ground but riding has been an ordeal! He has so much remembered pain and trauma that it has been absolute hell.
We are getting there now but he is still sharp, spooky and inclined to bolt as a first reaction and think about it later.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
How long does he stay in the other stalls vs his. What about the horses on either side - are they emitting negative energy that he's sensing. The best way to get a horse to do something is to create a situation whereby he wants to do it. This is where a person has to get creative. Here's an example. Dreaded fly spray. As long as the horse stood still while I sprayed water well to my side, he got a treat. Working in increments the spraying gradually got closer. When it barely touched his leg, he departed (he was at liberty) three or four strides, stopped, turned to face me and stood for oh, 20 seconds. I think he was trying to figure out how to get the treat. He approached me. I started again only with larger increments and within half a minute I'd sprayed him all over and gave him his treat. He could have left at any time but it was his decision to stay. Since that day he's always been easy to spray.
Sorry but What a long winded twiddly way of doing something and what a load of nonsense about "negative energy" from other horses.

My lad accepted fly spray because I had a head collar on him and I sprayed it on him. No treats involved. If he shies away from it I continue to spray it untill he stands still. When he stands still I stop and the pressure comes off.
Took all of 20 seconds and now I can use aerosol sprays on his head (a cut above his eye to be precise) and he doesnt move a muscle for it even without a headcollar or restraint.

My horses accept clippers because I say it is OK not because they want treats.
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    03-22-2013, 07:28 PM
  #117
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by faye    
My lad accepted fly spray because I had a head collar on him and I sprayed it on him. No treats involved. If he shies away from it I continue to spray it untill he stands still.
We all know how you can force a horse to put up with stuff Faye, but Saddle was giving another approach - getting the horse desensitised - and willing - about something without forcing them. Perhaps you don't get that it's a quite different attitude, but the horse certainly does. I would imagine you would likely have far more success with this 'long winded twiddle' in 'reprogramming' your horse's feelings about being ridden. But whatever, if you only believe in using negative reinforcement & restraint, that's fine too.
     
    03-22-2013, 07:40 PM
  #118
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by faye    
My lad accepted fly spray because I had a head collar on him and I sprayed it on him. No treats involved. If he shies away from it I continue to spray it untill he stands still.
We all know how you can force a horse to put up with stuff Faye, but Saddle was giving another option - getting the horse desensitised - and willing - about something without forcing them. Perhaps you don't get that it's a quite different attitude, but the horse certainly does. I would imagine you would likely have far more success with this 'long winded twiddle' in 'reprogramming' your horse's feelings about being ridden. But whatever, if you only believe in using negative reinforcement & restraint, that's your prerogative.
     
    03-22-2013, 09:25 PM
  #119
Yearling
As far as treats go, I'm with Faye. My mare gets treats when I want to love up on her. When she does something I am proud of the pressure is released and she gets a little scratch on the neck to show she did what I asked. Applying and relieving pressure is a huge way to teach a horse to do something, Faye is just stating another different way to do things-without treats.
boots likes this.
     
    03-23-2013, 12:38 AM
  #120
Yearling
Laying a horse down changes its attitude drastically from a negative to a positive. I have a 2yo colt that wanted to react aggressively towards me any time I wanted him to move forward or do ANYTHING he didn't want to do. I laid him down with a lariat rope and a rope halter and it did take a little while to do so, he was also tired (and a bit shaky.) Anyways, I got him down, then sat on his shoulder and rubbed him about his head and shoulders, on his stomach, just basically everywhere, although I stayed near his neck until he stopped trying to get up and relaxed. It probably took a good 2 1/2 hours to put the rope on him and lay him down (I use a saddle, which I already taught him to wear), then another hour of sitting on him while he was down.

I let him up then tied him for the rest of the time it took for me to work the other horses (tacked up still.) He was the first one out and the last in. Next day, he was a completely different horse, which was awesome! He also never back slid in his training and I rode him within a week or so of that day.

I've found that that more dominant horses who have had more leniant owners are tougher to start the process of laying down, although with that being said, it has taken me probably 45days (spread out over the course of like, a year and a half) to get to the point where I can walk up to my buckskin mare, pick up her foot, and press on her chest with nothing on her and have her respond and lay down with that. Success!


Another thing I've found that really helps some immature horses grow up quickly is some long tieing sessions with a couple water breaks. When I was starting colts for people, I had 3-5 horses plus my own mare, when I'd actually ride her, at different points of training. I'd tack them all up and tie them either hard to something, or on the walker, then would start riding/working them from most advanced to the brats/untrained guys. Really helped a lot, like they had to go through their impatience and learned it did them no good, so they were ready to think and participate in our lessons =) I always ride/work/desensitize/sit on them for at least an hour each, unless there was a miracle breakthrough, then I'd immediately reward and put them up, lol.

With that being said, it is so true that you only get the brats other people don't wait to mess with, lol. I did it almost a year and quit because I was tired of it, which sucks, cause I was making triple/quarduple an hour's work at my job, which paying an awesome $7.45 an hour, LOL.

Keep going at it, Ghost, you know what you're doing ;p I bet this colt is doing sliding stops and sorting cattle at the end of your length of training. ;) Good luck!
     

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