Am I going about this correctly? *pawing*
   

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Am I going about this correctly? *pawing*

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        05-03-2013, 11:45 AM
      #1
    Green Broke
    Am I going about this correctly? *pawing*

    I just got my new horse in March, and I am hoping to do a lot of showing with him which means he will be in stalls. He is kind of buddy sour, and just well... impatient. He throws his head around and paws. I had him at a show last weekend and while in the stall the first time he contently munched on hay and was really good. And then after the first class I put him back in the stall (Right next to his buddy) and he had hay and what not, but he started carrying on like a butthead and pawing and just being rude. So I was thinking of killing two birds with one stone (He also doesn't like to stand tied very well) so I was going to put him in a stall maybe with hay? And tie him up for increments of time until he stands quietly in the stall. Is that a good idea or is there a better way to do it?
         
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        05-03-2013, 12:08 PM
      #2
    Trained
    There is a very good, always booked up trainer here who teaches every horse patience. He has a lone tree in the middle of his yard, every horse while in his & his wife's training, spends time at the patience tree. My daughter had her notorious inpatient, pawing mare with him for two months, horse came back very patient. Everytime she went to see her horse, it was tied up to that tree!
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        05-03-2013, 12:13 PM
      #3
    Green Broke
    ^^Hmm, that is a good idea!
         
        05-03-2013, 12:14 PM
      #4
    Yearling
    Agreeing with waresbear. The Mexicans also will tie their horses to overhead limbs and leave them there until they're standing content, even if it takes all day. Tying a horse from overhead also has the benefit of allowing them to move in a circle which will bend their body and untrack their hindquarters over and over again, just as you'd do when you ride them. So in addition to teaching patience, it also prepares the horses to be ridden! I would much rather do that than to tie a horse to a wall or a hitching rail with less room to move, especially if they were apt to stand there and dig a hole!
    Elana likes this.
         
        05-03-2013, 12:15 PM
      #5
    Weanling
    Thats the best thing. Tie him up and leave him. Don't look at him, do nothing just leave him for a hour or so. Do this everyday. He will soon stop.
         
        05-03-2013, 12:36 PM
      #6
    Green Broke
    Or just giving him small bits of hay throughout the day will promote healthy digestion.
         
        05-03-2013, 12:50 PM
      #7
    Green Broke
    Ian Mcdonald, that also seems like a good idea. I have noticed a lot of trainers starting to tie them up higher and then since the horse can still move its feet, I feel like it might help the problem go faster. Thank you all so much for the great ideas! I am going to try these.
         
        05-03-2013, 01:13 PM
      #8
    Green Broke
    A funny story..

    Years ago there was a woman in our area who was quite accomplished with hunters and jumpers (Thoroughbreds). She stood a stallion known for throwing good hunters.

    She would take every horse to the indoor arena and tie them. What did she time them too? She as a large spring that hung down (up high) in the middle of the indoor and from that hung a rope. She would tie the horse to that spring and walk away. The elasticity would get the horse used to pressure but it gave... and never completely released. The horse could have a blue fit.. and the spring would to its job. The more the horse moved and pulled, the harder the spring pulled back. When the horse stood still under the spring was the only place with no pressure.

    Her horses all stood tied and were quiet and fine. I suppose you could say they were "spring tested." LOL
    waresbear and Ian McDonald like this.
         
        05-03-2013, 01:56 PM
      #9
    Green Broke
    We call it the "thinkin' tree"
    aforred, Elana, Gallop On and 1 others like this.
         
        05-03-2013, 02:11 PM
      #10
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Elana    
    A funny story..

    Years ago there was a woman in our area who was quite accomplished with hunters and jumpers (Thoroughbreds). She stood a stallion known for throwing good hunters.

    She would take every horse to the indoor arena and tie them. What did she time them too? She as a large spring that hung down (up high) in the middle of the indoor and from that hung a rope. She would tie the horse to that spring and walk away. The elasticity would get the horse used to pressure but it gave... and never completely released. The horse could have a blue fit.. and the spring would to its job. The more the horse moved and pulled, the harder the spring pulled back. When the horse stood still under the spring was the only place with no pressure.

    Her horses all stood tied and were quiet and fine. I suppose you could say they were "spring tested." LOL
    That bit with the spring has got me intrigued. Never considered such a thing before!
    Elana likes this.
         

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