Angry Stallion
 
 

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Angry Stallion

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  • Enraged caucassian stallion
  • Stallion pins ears bites when brushed

 
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    03-15-2008, 06:22 PM
  #1
Yearling
Angry Stallion

Okay, I told my barn manager I wanted to do horse training and she laughed at me. She said if I wanted to train I can work with her stallion Curly. I said, okay why not! So here is the deal. He is pushy, aggressive, he bites, he rears and strikes out at you, he kicks, bolts and bucks. She wants me to have him be ready for the saddle again, well, I was lunging him the other day, and he did about two lap, and turned in to face me then charged me, bit my arm knocked my down and kicked me AND stepped on my arm, THANK GOD it didn't break. I told her what he did and she still wants me to work with him. So I did. I worked him a couple more times but he will NOT stop biting and if you do anything to stop him, he will rear up on you and strike. When he would start to nip, I'd tap him with the crop and say no, and I'd say tap him instantly. The more I told him no, he harder he was biting and pretty soon he reared up on me and knocked me down. Then I was leading him and he bit my coat and tore back against me and I slipped on the ice and he ran of and dragged me to the cement where I had no choice but to let go or be ground up like hamburger. Now I have a very large bruise on my leg where I was kicked, I have a cut on my other leg and a very large sore, which is scabbed up now, where he bit my arm, and scratches on my tummy. He is completely unruly and hasn't been touched in over two years since his stall is attached to his paddock she just tosses him food and water. He cribs from boredom and I'm trying to help him but all he does attack me and run back to his stall and wait to be let in! He is 16.2hh so he's not small either. He is 6 or 7 I'm not sure and he was broke to ride at one point but hasn't been ridden or worked with in a few years except breeding.

ARG! What should I do? He's beautiful and can be sweet but TERRIBLE at the same time. He is quite dangerous. I've tried working him both with and without a chain and he reacts the same either way, if not a little naughtier WITH the chain.
     
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    03-15-2008, 07:02 PM
  #2
Showing
Good god. First off, he should be gelded. Secondly, I know it's in his best interest to be worked, but stallions need to be trained by a very experienced horseperson that won't let them get away with anything - especially one this .. well, the only term that comes to mind is dangerous.
I commend you for wanting to work with him, but if he's already done this much damage that you can't even safely lead him..???
I would get him in a round pen and work him on gaining dominance and joining up. Make him start to turn in towards you when you ask him to change direction rather than turn his hindquarters in.
As for lunging, you have to be quicker than him - if you see him square up to charge, move to the side and chase him away from you - you CAN'T let him move into your personal space unless you ask him to.
Foget that tapping nonsense - I would give him a good smack on the shoulder if he bites, something that actually says "STOP" rather than "please pretty please horsie don't do that.. please?". Back him up away from you - fast. Make him almost sit on his haunches he's backing away from you so quickly. Do that EVERY time he even threatens to bite.
If he starts to get out of control, back him up or make him do a tiny circle around you.
The rearing problem is not good. Remember that horses have a "neutral" spot where their noses are almost to their shoulders; they can't buck or rear or anything from there. Another thing to try is disengaging the hindquarters.

I would be furious with my barn owner if she let this stallion treat anyone like that - if she's a knowledgable horseperson, she would treat the situation differently. The fact that this horse has kicked you and bowled you over twice? Unacceptable.
     
    03-15-2008, 07:08 PM
  #3
Yearling
I told her she should have him handled by a professional after he was acting up being led but she said she wants me to work with him until she can find someone in her price range. I don't want to tell her he's a unruly jerk who should NOT be making babies as I can't afford to board anywhere else, as I feel bad for the guy but I'd like to stay in all one piece as well.

Edit- I just thought I'd mention she wanted to geld him or sell him but he has one undescended testicle and Jack, her husband, says that gelding him will be too expensive and wont let her sell him either since the he is jointly owned between him and Nancy, my barn manager.
     
    03-15-2008, 07:11 PM
  #4
Showing
Don't work with him then, simple as that. Are you getting paid to work with him? Is it worth getting beaten and bruised? Have you ever worked with unruly stallions before?
     
    03-15-2008, 07:18 PM
  #5
Yearling
I really don't want to but if I do she gives me free board. I recently got fired from my job, long story, and need the money as I couldn't stand selling my horse while I'm in between jobs.

I'm not scared of him so I don't understand why he's doing this. I am trying to be firm with him but I have never worked with a stallion before. He is such a beautiful mover, I wish she'd just geld him so he wouldn't be so crazy.
     
    03-15-2008, 07:22 PM
  #6
Showing
Act completely confident, even if you don't feel it inside. What do you think of my other suggestions?
     
    03-15-2008, 08:43 PM
  #7
Yearling
Very well. I am going to try them out, if I am still getting plowed down, I will tell her I am sorry I cannot do this and resort to working at McDonalds.
     
    03-15-2008, 09:27 PM
  #8
Started
With that much aggression, you should have taken a freaking baseball bat or a broom handle in there and knocked his dang head off.

Every time he shows aggression, you need to make him think hell is half a step behind him. Correct with force every act of aggression. If it comes to striking with a lunge whip, remember to aim for the same spot. Carry a lunge whip with you. In dad's words, "A Stallion must have manners." No ifs, ands, buts, or excuses are to be made for a horse that is aggressive.

You need to ask the BO. Will your insurance cover it if this horse hurts or kills someone. He is merely a liability. And there is NO reason for him to be a stallion. And it is not THAT much more expensive. It requires a bit more

We had a cryptorchid(spelling?). When our vet came out he said that they are more prone to agression and behavioral issues because of it. Luckily, because I made my little boy mind from the start he is now a nine year old kid's horse.

We had a two year old would would throw angry tantrums when HE was done working. He would stop in the arena and start digging and stiking, and skaking his head. We got him gelded and he was fine.
     
    03-15-2008, 11:57 PM
  #9
Yearling
Abby, I really wish that you would not work with that stallion. From what you have described, he is deadly dangerous. He is not the horse for you to start your training career with. I hope you are able to work something else out - the barn owner is irresponsible to ask you to work with her stallion who is clearly dangerous and aggressive. Please be safe - it is not worth it.

We can give you all sorts of tips, but it comes down to you having really good instincts for his reactions, and you anticipating what he will do, and acting faster than he can. You have to be very firm, but effectively firm. Just going after him with more violence will do you no good. You have to react at just the right time with just enough force to show him you are the lead stallion.

I hope you are able to work something out so that you can stop working with him - this lady needs to invest money with a very experienced trainer of stallions (who has had success) or invest in gelding him. It is not your problem.
     
    03-16-2008, 12:09 AM
  #10
Yearling
I do agree with you AK. I called her tonight after reading through theses post and told her I will not be working with him any longer. I would much rather devote my time to finishing out Rocket, my moms horse. I've got him standing to mount, riding and stopping on a dime but he needs work on his cues and turning and I'd much rather devote my time there than a stallion with no manners at all and is continuing to be disrespectful despite my efforts. My BM is about 60 years old and can't handle him anymore and I wish she'd geld him or send him off to be professional worked because I'd hate to see him get lose and reek havoc among the barn by knocking her down as he has half-a-dozen times but Jack won't allow it and she can't do anything without him agreeing to it. He is such a nice riding horse, I've seen some videos of him and he is absolutely stunning. I suppose a part of me was hoping to bring that back but he is too much to handle and I am admitting defeat.

Thanks for helping me out though guys, you helped me realize when enough is enough. I've put only a week maybe two now on him and he has improved a with being led, he doesn't pull and will follow respectfully but the second I stop he tries to bite or rear up and break away, but that is a huge improvement from rearing and bolting while be led. It has been very slow going and rather hopeless as I've barely made a change. One thing I have done though is discovered further confidence in myself and what I've done with Rocket at least because I recovered from my spills so well I am quite proud of myself but it is definitely time to call quits. I've also learned when to admit that too much is just too much. I'll post up some pictures of him and maybe a short video of him when he's playing around his pasture, he really is beautiful, just mean and angry. He almost always pins his ears when he sees you and tries to bite you through the bars or fence if you linger too long in front of his stall or paddock.
     

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