Anti-Panic training - Page 3
 
 

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Anti-Panic training

This is a discussion on Anti-Panic training within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
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    11-12-2012, 09:48 AM
  #21
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydee    
I think that Bluebird must live in a different Uk to the one I left 5 years ago, Health & Safety Laws apply to humans and not to animals and in that respect are no stricter there than they are here and they don't apply to what you do in your own time on your own property.
You don't need a BHS certificate to legally work with horses unless you are going into a teaching situation. I know a lot of yards who wont employ people who have gone the BHS Equestrian college route because they are often girls who've never ridden a horse outside of a riding school situation and have no idea how to deal with a horse that doesnt play the right game.
I have always turned young and new horses out in a leather or break away headcollar with a short length of bailer twine attached to it, I've done this hundreds of times and never seen one accident, its actually a really effective way to train a horse not to panic in a situation where it feels 'caught up'. Its all about teaching a horse to relax and give to pressure
Horses will go out of their way to do stupid things but you can't wrap them in cotton wool and the most accidents I've seen over the years have been caused by people doing things with horses that they didnt have enough knowledge or experience to handle but thought they did
Thank you for that first bit. The laws Bluebird was spouting about didn't make sense to me, but I'm American born and bred so what do I know! That said, if I ever move my horses, I'm going to do whatever I want with them, even if the whole of the UK looks down on me for having a well-trained horse. =P
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    11-12-2012, 09:57 AM
  #22
Foal
I have been just been working on getting him to drop his head when he feels pressure on the halter, and today, a friend of mine took him out to groom him while I saddled one of the lesson horses for a new rider. Halfway to the cross ties, she let go of the lead rope on accident and he stepped on it. He stopped, dropped his head and waited until she picked up his foot to raise his head. I was so proud of him! :) Thank you for all of your ideas.
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    11-12-2012, 11:03 AM
  #23
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by riccil0ve    
So what happens when your horse gets caught up in fencing in the pasture? Or some bramble/vines on the trail? You just *hope* you have enough trust with your animal so it doesn't flounce about while you try to rescue it? What about the fencing, where it has an hour or more of time alone to hurt itself trying to get free?

I am 95% confident that if Ricci gets caught up in a fence, she will wait for me to come get her because of her training. Just yesterday, I was riding Gracie in a field and she got her foot stuck in a long vine. Because of her training, she kept her head on and I was able to maneuver her out of it.

If you think your horses would do the same thing because you think it trusts you 100% you are sorely misguided. They are flight animals first. In the wild, they don't wait for the help of the trusted alpha mare, they try to get out. This is precisely why you must TRAIN THEM to handle it when they get stuck.

I agree 100% with Loosie. It is negligent on your part not to do this kind of training. Both my girls know how to ground tie as well. That teaches them to stand, it has nothing to do with training them not to panic. So please tell me, what would YOU do to train your horse not to panic? Don't tell me you wouldn't do it my way because its "unsafe," tell me what YOU WOULD DO.
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I certainly would not train my horse by allowing it to drag around a lead rope for a few hours as other people have suggested! If you read my other posts, you will see that I have explained that we train our horses to back up. Really, really easy to do and not dangerous. Also a method which IS approved by the British Horse Society which, once qualifications have been gained, you can actually manage horses and charge people money. I would never use a 'trainer' who allowed my horses just to drag a lead rope around and teach themselves. At the end of the day this method isn't done in proper horse training establishments in the UK. What people do on their private property with their own horses is up to them. We will agree to differ. I like my horses sensible, trusting and totally unharmed by their training and I also like to train them safely using approved methods. What everyone else does is entirely up to them.
     
    11-12-2012, 05:45 PM
  #24
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluebird    
I certainly would not train my horse by allowing it to drag around a lead rope
We already get that loud & clear, as you've repeatedly said this already(have you forgotten??) & been so rude & derogatory about opposing opinions. You were asked what you WOULD do. Since teaching a horse to back up is not something that would help if it got loose, stepped on it's lead - as is obvious by the eg. You gave - is not something that will help a horse if stuck in a fence or such, is not something that would help a horse that can't back up for whatever reason - such as your eg.... we are asking what you would do to prepare the horse for these eventualities. Sounds like you advocate doing nothing?

I also don't believe anything of what you say about laws & certainly don't believe every professional in the UK is as negligent, head-in-the-sand as you appear to be.
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    11-12-2012, 11:30 PM
  #25
Trained
You teach the horse to back up. Okay. Vague, so I'm going to make a few assumptions. I am going to ASSUME that you need to allow the horse to step on it's lead rope. I am going to ASSUME that then, you ask the horse to back up and step off the lead rope.

Again, if my ASSUMPTIONS are correct, how are you doing something entirely different than what we are doing? We allow a horse to step on it's lead rope, and then come release it. The only difference I see is a pompous attitude and a belief that you somehow have better training methods and better trained horses than anyone else.

No one to my knowledge has said to let it drag a lead rope for "hours." I let mine wander and graze for maybe an hour WITH ME THERE THE WHOLE TIME, it's just a matter of waiting until they get stuck. If they get stuck in ten minutes, they only drag the lead for ten minutes. If they manage to go an hour before stepping on it, the drag it for an hour.

Also, just in case you were curious, if a horse gets caught in a fence line, he can't just back up and get free. It anything, teaching a horse to MOVE when it's stuck is going to make it worse, whereas our standpoint is teaching it to STAY STILL AND WAIT for help.

I will say again, I am as confident as anyone can be when it comes to horses that both my girls will remain CALM and STILL if they are ever so unfortunate to get caught up in anything. Are you that confident?
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    11-13-2012, 10:45 AM
  #26
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluebird    
I certainly would not train my horse by allowing it to drag around a lead rope for a few hours as other people have suggested! If you read my other posts, you will see that I have explained that we train our horses to back up. Really, really easy to do and not dangerous. Also a method which IS approved by the British Horse Society which, once qualifications have been gained, you can actually manage horses and charge people money. I would never use a 'trainer' who allowed my horses just to drag a lead rope around and teach themselves. At the end of the day this method isn't done in proper horse training establishments in the UK. What people do on their private property with their own horses is up to them. We will agree to differ. I like my horses sensible, trusting and totally unharmed by their training and I also like to train them safely using approved methods. What everyone else does is entirely up to them.
I'm afraid I do find your tone extremely condescending - you really seem to be implying that we idiots should be able to learn to back a horse up because its 'really really easy'
People have allowed horses to tread on lead ropes on 'proper' horse training yards in the UK for years, I think you maybe just havent been around many 'proper' training yards - most of them aren't BHS yards as unless they teach they don't need to be, they are just people doing the same job as they do over here
As for getting a job and charging money once you have your BHS qualification - it may work for some people who already have a good background in horses but for most its going to be a low paid dogsbody job until you prove yourself. The top earning trainers/instructors are those who are proven in some competitive field. Supermarkets, care homes and factories are full of qualified BHS students who either couldnt find work, could make more money working in those places or simply couldnt cope with the real world of a horse job.
     

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