Anybody train horses?
 
 

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Anybody train horses?

This is a discussion on Anybody train horses? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Is it true that orphan colts are the hardest horses to train?
  • What is the hardest horse to train

 
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    11-29-2006, 09:37 PM
  #1
Foal
Anybody train horses?

Does anyone train horses? If anyone would like to message me or e-mail me. I would appreciate it, I need an interview for a school project. Just a few general questions, if anyone wouldnt mind.

Thanks!

Yokoukuramalover@aim.com
     
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    11-29-2006, 10:37 PM
  #2
Super Moderator
Hi Yayoi_sama,

I'm sure you will get a number of responses if you post your questions here.
     
    11-29-2006, 10:38 PM
  #3
Foal
Yea your probably right.

Thanks!
     
    11-29-2006, 11:42 PM
  #4
Foal
Questions.

1.When did you start training horses?

2. What was you first experiance working with a horse like?

3. Is it harder to train older or younger horses?

4. What made you wan to train horses? Necesity, or maybe a job oppertunity?

5. What is the hardest thing you have ever taught a horse?

6. Whats the most rewarding thing about training?

7. Do you plan to go professional in doing training.

8. How long does it take to traib a green horse? Or does it depend on the horse?

9. Any other comments about training you think are important?
     
    11-30-2006, 11:10 PM
  #5
Foal
Here is my input, hope it helps....

1.When did you start training horses?
Technically at age 18, but I started riding when I was 5, first show at 8 years old, and started to get clients at 15. But when I turned 18 is when things kicked in even more.

2. What was you first experiance working with a horse like?
I rode ponies as a youth and don't really remember them. But I clearly remember a very special buckskin Quarter Horse I rode and showed when I was 8 years old, his name was Bucky. I will always remember him! As far as my first experience getting paid to train a horse, I had a problem horse no less! I don't remember his name, but he was as mean and wild as they come, but I was determined to break him, which I did. I learned a tremendous amount about training horses from him and so I will always remember that turning point for me.

3. Is it harder to train older or younger horses?
It depends on the horse. Older horses may have been trained by many trainers along the way which could take a long time to redo or retrain your own way. They also have certain set in habits just like humans do which can be hard to break as well. Young horses are moldable to start with, but they can sometimes come with risks because they are learning and fresh. There can be young horses that are very easy going and trained quickly with no problems, whereas it may take a very long time to retrain an older horse. Then there is the opposite--an older horse may be very open to retraining, and the young horse is stubborn and high powered enough make training more of a challenge. Again, it all depends on each individual horse.

4. What made you wan to train horses? Necesity, or maybe a job oppertunity?
I've always wanted to be a trainer, I knew it when I was put up aboard my first pony. When I was 12 and was already very heavy into horses, my parents actually tried to stop me from being around horses and regretted supporting me so much in it. As time went by and I refused to give up horses, they realized there was no point in stopping me.

5. What is the hardest thing you have ever taught a horse?
I work a lot with problem horses because I understand them. There have been a countless number of horses I have worked with who were misunderstood. There was one horse called ET who hated everyone and everything and all his behavior was geared towards pinning people against walls, charging at them, biting, kicking, rearing, striking, etc. You name it, he did it, and in a very deadly meaninful way, he was seriously out to hurt you. He was the most dangerous horse I've ever agreed to work with, but I knew he was misunderstood and took him on. To make a long story short, I helped him, as well as all the people who worked with him because he was very misunderstood. It took me a year to do so, but he is truelly a sweetheart of a horse.

6. Whats the most rewarding thing about training?
I am rewarded when I show clients WHY their horses are behaving a certain way and showing them the results from understanding them. It makes me happy when the horses are at ease. I believe that all horse problems are the direct fault of humans. Therefore, I spend a lot of time not only working on the horse itself, but with the owners and handlers of the horses. Most of the time, I first watch how the owners work with their horses so see where the issues are stemming from, then it's easy to come up with an explanation for the horses behavior, and a suitable training plan.

7. Do you plan to go professional in doing training.
I am currently a professional trainer.

8. How long does it take to traib a green horse? Or does it depend on the horse?
It depends on the horse. A new horse in training is doing well under saddle after about 90 days of consistant training. It takes a good 6 months to a year for horse show perfection in my opinion. It's the Exposure to things that really makes the difference though. This means lots of exposure to other arenas, trailering, going to some warm up shows and events, etc. This helps to put some experience into the horses training at a faster rate. A horse that is more "seasoned" does not neccessarily means it's older, but has had more exposure and experience with something other than it's own home barn and backyard.

9. Any other comments about training you think are important?
Looking back, I was fortunate enough to have ridden just about every breed of horse I could ride. I rode everything from mustangs to draft horses, shetlands to walking horses, arabians to thoroughbreds, etc. Through all of that, the more I worked with Quarter Horses, the more I realized as time went by that they were my breed of choice overall. As far as training, I was also very fortunate to work under many different trainers of all disciplines. This helped me not only to keep an open mind to different training, but I was able to incorporate different techniques together to help my own horses in training. It gave me perspective on how I want my own standards to be. This is because I have worked with some trainers who did things I do not agree with and would not repeat. Then there are some trainers who I am thankful for even more because of how wonderful they treated the horses. Through it all, I learned so much about the differences between trainers, yet figured out how I'd wanted my own style to be.....Training should be all about the horse and what the horse wants, especially if you want to be successful with that horse. When evaluating a new horse in training, I work on figuring out what event the horse is happiest and most comfortable with.doing, then I merge what they are the most talented in and have the most potential for and then go from there......I hope this helps
     
    12-10-2006, 08:13 AM
  #6
Foal
training

1.When did you start training horses?
I started tring horses when I was 15.

2. What was you first experiance working with a horse like?
I was with all 16-17 hand horses simce I was a baby. I now have 10 horses 2 colts that I have people booking their mares. I starterd showing when I was 13 I rode a black Quarter/morgan mare named Beauty I sitlll have her she is about 29 years old.

3. Is it harder to train older or younger horses?
I realy do not know because with the methods that I useit really dose not matter.

4. What made you wan to train horses? Necesity, or maybe a job oppertunity?
I love horses and I would not beable to work with out them so I desided to start training. For me it would be a necesity job.

5. What is the hardest thing you have ever taught a horse?
How to lisent to it owner and not tack advantage of it owner.

6. Whats the most rewarding thing about training?
You get to work with horses all day.

7. Do you plan to go professional in doing training.
Yes, because I do a jental method of traing. My method of traing is called Join up.

8. How long does it take to traib a green horse? Or does it depend on the horse?
It would depend on the horse. Some horses may take longer or they might not take log at all.

9. Any other comments about training you think are important?
Traing is not going to bring much mony I have to find a second job so I can cope with the money issues.
     
    12-27-2006, 03:24 AM
  #7
Foal
I'm new here, but figured I'd answer your questions anyway. Hope I'm not stepping on toes.

1.When did you start training horses? After a seven year career in the military, Idecided to start buckarooing and cowboying. I started specializing in training horses then. I was 25.

2. What was you first experiance working with a horse like?
I rode as a kid growing up, but not alot, and even less as a young adult. My first professional experience was on a cow outfit in utah. The horses were typical crappy cowboy horses. They'd run through the bit, and you had to really get after them with the spurs to get them to turn or work off your legs, if they would at all.

3. Is it harder to train older or younger horses? Older horses. A young horse is generally not difficult for a good horseman to start and educate properly. A spoiled pet horse or problem horse can be a nightmare to fix.

4. What made you wan to train horses? Necesity, or maybe a job oppertunity? I wanted to be outdoors and horseback. (too many Louis L'Amour novels as a kid. As a cowboy, I needed to create a niche for myself. Being a trainer was it.

5. What is the hardest thing you have ever taught a horse? I had an off the track TB that had broken two peoples' backs by flipping over backwards on them. Turning him into a solid all-around bridle horse was tough.

6. Whats the most rewarding thing about training? Taking a horse that other trainers have said is incorrigible and making him a safe and reliable mount.

7. Do you plan to go professional in doing training. No. I planned on cowboying, and starting ranch horses only. Then I realized I could make a lot more money as a full-time trainer.

8. How long does it take to traib a green horse? Or does it depend on the horse? Depends on the ultimate rider. I can have a cowboy horse ready for a cowboy to ride and rope off in a week or two. I can have most colts ready for an intermediate rider to trail ride on in 60 days, and to work cows and rope off in 90-120 days.

9. Any other comments about training you think are important? Good horsemanship is good horsemanship.. I've made cowhorses, English horses, and all around recreational horses. The fundamentals are the same. Don't get the idea that because someone doesn't label themselves with the hype of "Natural Horsemanship" that they are a bad horseman or are mean to their animals. [/quote]
     
    03-12-2009, 02:16 AM
  #8
Weanling
My input if it'll help. Lol

1) I actually started training horses on my own at 12.
2)Fun and scary at the same time. I was little.
3)Depends on the horse. Young ones can be boogers or sweet little things, and older ones can be sweet and easy to retrain or they could have had a bad trainer and be quite difficult to train.
4)Necessity. While my dad went off with his girlfriend, I was alone at the barn training a young horse by myself for a show. It was either learn quick or get hurt. Now it will give me opportunities for jobs too.
5)To not try to throw its rider every five minutes...literally.
6)Seeing an inexperienced rider go and have fun on a solid horse. :)
7)I hope to go into Vet school and become a vet. With a little training on the side maybe. ;)
8)Depends on the horse and sometimes its past. If it doesn't like men(or women) because it was beaten, that poses a problem.
9)Train them right or don't train them at all. Be kind to the animals, people, and be a good sport. It helps get you a good reputation which goes far.
     
    03-12-2009, 05:31 AM
  #9
Showing
Here are my answers to your questions.

1.When did you start training horses?
I rode my first green broke horse when I was 9. My Dad started giving me all his green broke ones to put miles on when I was 12. Started breaking them myself when I was 14.

2. What was you first experience working with a horse like?
The first green broke horse when I was 9 taught me a lot.........after he bucked me off and broke my arm. Taught me to keep my butt in the saddle and watch the horse's ears and feel his movements. It has been a very challenging and rewarding experience.

3. Is it harder to train older or younger horses?
I haven't really noticed a difference. I have started horses ranging in age from 2 to 6. The oldest being my bay Mustang Koda. I didn't get him until he was 5 and he had be labeled one of those "untrainable" horses by his owner and a professional trainer. Sometimes older horses have had more time to get set in their ways and pick up more bad habits but that is the only thing.

4. What made you wan to train horses? Necessity, or maybe a job opportunity?
It was just runs in my family. My Dad has been training horses for about 40 years and I absolutely idolize him. I would give my eyeteeth to have one third the horse sense he has. Plus, horses are my passion. They give me a sense of accomplishment, fulfillment, and confidence.

5. What is the hardest thing you have ever taught a horse?
Trust. My gray Mustang Dobe had never been touched when I got him except to brand him and give his first round shots. He was even still a stud at 3 when I brought him home. It took a long time to get him where I could just walk up to him without him freaking out. Now he will follow me anywhere and when something scares him, he looks to me for support, comfort, and protection.

6. Whats the most rewarding thing about training?
There is no feeling in the world than to take a horse that everyone else has deemed "dangerous" or "untrainable" and have him kid broke in a couple of years. I don't know how many times I get that look of doubt when I tell people that I can be riding a young horse within a few hours and working cattle on him in days.

7. Do you plan to go professional in doing training?
I would love to but unless you plan to train show horses, around here it is hard to make a living. If you are just training riding horses, most of what you get are the culls that everyone else and their brother has tried to ride and nearly ruined. It takes more time to untrain their bad habits than it does to teach them correctly. That is if they don't hurt you.

8. How long does it take to train a green horse? Or does it depend on the horse?
It really depends on the horse and what prior experience they have had with people. I prefer to work with a horse that has never been handled because they are a clean slate and can be taught everything correctly from the beginning. A horse that has been handled can take much longer as I mentioned in #7. Also, some horses are just more stubborn than others and you have to be creative in your training styles. What works for one horse will generally not work for the next one. You have to modify your training style for each horse to get the same result.

9. Any other comments about training you think are important?
The most important thing in my mind is to challenge a young horse but a good trainer must know when to stop before they ask to much. You also cannot let a young horse get bored because that is usually when they start causing problems just to have something to do. A tired horse learns more than a fresh horse and you must be assertive and firm but never cruel. Correct bad behavior but never punish out of anger. If you begin to get angry, then you need to just walk away and start again tomorrow.

If you have any other questions, feel free to e-mail me at smrobs84@yahoo.com :)
     
    03-12-2009, 11:03 AM
  #10
Weanling
Hope this helps!

1.When did you start training horses?
Started at 16. Started my business at 18

2. What was you first experiance working with a horse like?
Very rewarding. Establishing that level of communication for the first time was an unforgettable moment

3. Is it harder to train older or younger horses?
Definitely an older horse... they've had more time to develop negative behaviors (especially if coddled). Not to mention, they have more weight in which to injure you.

4. What made you want to train horses? Necesity, or maybe a job opportunity?
My first horse was 1 when I was 11 and I didn't want to pay someone else to do something I could very well do. I found out it is actually a lot easier than I thought. A job opportunity came from this.

5. What is the hardest thing you have ever taught a horse?
Upper level dressage moves.. Half Pass, Piaffe, etc. The level of communication is SO complex.. its easy for the horse or rider to get confused.

6. Whats the most rewarding thing about training?
The moment that the horse "gets it". They get so excited when they figure it out. Not to mention it is awesome to take an unruly, unbroke horse and turn it into a safe calm riding horse =)

7. Do you plan to go professional in doing training.
Already am!

8. How long does it take to traib a green horse? Or does it depend on the horse?
Definitely depends on the horse, and the trainers definition of Green Broke. My definition of Green Broke is: A horse that is safe to walk, trot and canter (no bucks)... I guess its like building a foundation for a house. You have to take your time and do it right or else the house will fall apart once it is being built. So, to answer the question.. it could be as fast as two weeks, or as long as 2 months (thats the longest horse I ever had).

9. Any other comments about training you think are important?
Someone who just "breaks horses" will never be a good trainer. Someone who can establish that communication line between horse and rider... THAT person will be a phenolinal trainer. And, a good trainer will always put the horse away happy.. and do something pleasent for the horse after the ride =)
     

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