Arena sour?
 
 

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Arena sour?

This is a discussion on Arena sour? within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • How to tell if my horse is arena sour
  • ARENA SOUR CROW HOPPING HORSE

 
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    03-12-2010, 05:58 PM
  #1
Weanling
Arena sour?

I am 90% sure my horse is arena sour. This has actually been going on for over 3 months. He all of a sudden started acting up in the arena, and hasn't been normal since then. I know at one point near the begining of this he was sore for some unknown reason. The vet gave me bute to give to him for a week until the soreness went away. Then I was able to take him on a trail ride where he was a perfect angel. My trainer, who came home for college break, was able to work with him and get him to work normally. Then I had surgery and he sat for a month before my friend was able to work with him. Now he is acting up again in the arena, and worse then he was before. She cannot get him to do more then a walk. He kicks out, then crow hops, then actually bucks if she keeps asking him to trot. She is a very experianced horse owner, but isn't a trainer, and she can't ride him more then once a week. I can't ride him at all because of my recent surgery if I was to get tossed I would be screwed.

So... all you people that know more about training then I do, what do you reccomend doing to train him out of this? My dad wants to sell him "because he's not safe," but I was hoping there was another way around this. The last resort would be to send him to a trainer because they cost 500+ a month (usually not including board) and I can't afford that right now.
     
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    03-12-2010, 11:20 PM
  #2
Foal
Horses act up when they are not worked with enough. I have experienced naughty horses & most of the time it is because they are only being ridden once a week. Ask your friend to work on lunging in a round pen (If you have one.) & walking around in the arena on foot (Halter & lead.) before mounting up. It is good to get your horse's mind on their rider before mounting up. To me, it really does sound like he is just full of energy from not being worked with. Don't worry about it too much, you'll be back in the saddle in no time & will be able to work him again. The more the horse is worked with, the better they get.
If he always has been bad in arenas, try doing different things in the arena besides riding. Try lunging him in it or let him loose in it for a little while to explore. Make it an enjoyable place & let him know that the arena always doesn't mean "riding."
Goodluck.
     
    03-13-2010, 12:10 AM
  #3
Weanling
He won't lunge either. He strikes out when being lunged. This behavior started when he was being worked 3+ times a week, and was excentuated because of not being worked. If I let him loose in it he tries to graze on the grass that's growing through the sand, and I'm worried about him ingesting the sand and colicing. If I ask him to walk on and not graze he strikes out.
Sorry if this sounds like I'm just being negative about everything, just trying to explane more fully what is going on.
     
    03-13-2010, 12:23 AM
  #4
Foal
I totally understand!
Try going back to basic ground work & working on building up his trust for you. Sounds like he is a naughty pony & has no respect for anyone (Sorry... gotta be honest.). I highly recommend looking into Clinton Anderson's natural horsemanship methods. They worked miracles on my paint mare who was also a pain in the back end. Take a look at this: Establishing Respect and Control :: Downunder Horsemanship
I have this book & have gone through all the steps in it. Its easy, a heck of a lot of fun, & I noticed a huge difference in my horse after a month of working on it with her.
If I owned your horse, I would be doing a lot of ground work with him before even thinking about putting the saddle on him. He needs to learn to respect you.
You can do it. Choose a goal. Be determined to achieve it. Don't give up. It will all be worth it in the end. Trust me.
     
    03-13-2010, 08:34 AM
  #5
Banned
If he was good trail riding why not just go for long walks in the bush?? He seems happy running trail and I don't blame him. Going round and round in the same old area gets boring for both of you.
If it was me and I was sore like you might be from the surgury I would bit him up with a curb, a tom thumb and good curb strap and take him out. The curb will give you ALOT more control and if used gently is no more then your snaffle but again with alot more control.. He starts anything you can quickly pull him up.
     
    03-13-2010, 09:17 AM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by RiosDad    
If he was good trail riding why not just go for long walks in the bush?? He seems happy running trail and I don't blame him. Going round and round in the same old area gets boring for both of you.
If it was me and I was sore like you might be from the surgury I would bit him up with a curb, a tom thumb and good curb strap and take him out. The curb will give you ALOT more control and if used gently is no more then your snaffle but again with alot more control.. He starts anything you can quickly pull him up.
Bigger bits never solve problems.
     
    03-13-2010, 10:53 AM
  #7
Weanling
Thank you. I will be working on ground work with him.

As for the bit, he works best in his hackamore then in his bit. He was orignally trained in it and just within the last year was trained to a bit. He has a soft mouth so I'm not using the bit during this time, because I don't want to accidentally pull too hard on his mouth.
     
    03-13-2010, 11:09 AM
  #8
Yearling
I have to say, I agree with RiosDad. You don't have to be harsh with it at all, it's just reinforcement. Yet again, Rowzy, if you're afraid of pulling too hard on his mouth, than you are right...you probably shouldn't use the curb until you are more familiar with it. I will say that I am all for natural horsemanship...or should I say I used to be. I realized that most of the time, you just don't have to time for natural horsemanship. Not because you don't literally have the time but because it won't come in handy if you are in an accident. You have to realize that horses are just plain out, freakin dangerous and frankly, I don't want to risk my life with natural horsemanship when I can get the job done in a more benefical way.
     
    03-13-2010, 11:49 AM
  #9
Foal
Good luck Rowzy! Keep him in the hackamore... that's the best thing to do for now until you build a strong bond with him through ground work. Now, to the person above me, you can avoid "accidents" if you take the time to work on natural horsemanship. There will be no accidents if you & your horse trust each other. Rowzy, keep him in the hackamore if you don't feel comfortable using the bit. Take your time with him. Putting more & more gear & harsher bits on him will not solve the problem... trust me.
If you want any tips on some of Clinton's groundwork techniques... message me! I'll be happy to help you & your horse out.
     
    03-13-2010, 11:53 AM
  #10
Trained
So, the horse was sore, you fed him bute and magically he is fine? I have a tough time believing that. Did you ever bother to find out why he was sore and actually treat it?
The reason I say this is because horses in general want to please us and will try their best to do what they think we want. When they are being blatantly disobedient, it is usually not a training issue (except in some extreme circumstances) but that they are in pain and responding to that.
The horse has had a "soreness" issue recently that went basically untreated, this is a huge red light. Get out a vet with more than just bute in his truck and get your horse comfortable. I would get flexion tests, a full physical and his teeth checked. While you're at it, check your saddle/tack fit.

Good luck!
     

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