Asking horse to back up after stop? - The Horse Forum

 2Likes
  • 2 Post By smrobs
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 9 Old 03-12-2012, 02:29 PM Thread Starter
Foal
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 26
• Horses: 0
Asking horse to back up after stop?

I was visiting someone with horses yesterday and she told me her neighbor told her to back her horse up a few steps after a stop so it ends up on it's "butt" (I think she might of meant haunches? Lol)

When I did dressage I don't remember doing this. Can anyone explain? Is it a western thing or does it just depend on the horse?

Thanks!
sassaflash is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 9 Old 03-12-2012, 02:51 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Western Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,789
• Horses: 1
I do this with Lucky everytime I stop, aside from trail rides. She has a bouncy stop from a canter (games especially) and it's really hard on my back.

The basic is that the horse will anticipate being asked to back, so they'll stop on their haunches instead of hopping to a stop. A lot of western sport riders (aside from pleasure, trail, etc) don't normally slow down before they stop (stopping after the horse it reaches a walk/trot, versus a canter or run..kind of like sliding stops, without the excessive sliding..ya know?), so it's usually hard on both the horse and rider when the horse jams its front end down instead of rocking back and using its butt to stop, creating a smoother canter/stop transition.

I might not have explained that the best..but I'm sure it's enough to get the general idea across.
Posted via Mobile Device
Iseul is offline  
post #3 of 9 Old 03-12-2012, 02:55 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Higgins, TX. YeeHaw!!
Posts: 22,057
• Horses: 24
It only helps if you are getting the horse to go forward correctly and back up correctly. If the horse travels hollow and strung out going forward and is hollow and strung out while backing up, then they won't stop on their hind end no matter how many times you repeat the action.

However, if you are doing it right, backing up when you stop (not every single time, though) will help them learn to stop harder and faster with less cueing and if they are already nicely rounded up, it will help them to be more consistent about staying round and stopping on the rear end smoothly.
kevinshorses and AQHA13 like this.

Always remember that feeling of looking at a big, open country over the ears of a good horse, seeing a new trail unwind ahead of you, and that ever-spectacular view from the top of the ridge!!! Follow my training blog: http://robertsontraining.blogspot.com/
smrobs is offline  
post #4 of 9 Old 03-12-2012, 03:22 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 38,410
• Horses: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by smrobs View Post
It only helps if you are getting the horse to go forward correctly and back up correctly. If the horse travels hollow and strung out going forward and is hollow and strung out while backing up, then they won't stop on their hind end no matter how many times you repeat the action.

However, if you are doing it right, backing up when you stop (not every single time, though) will help them learn to stop harder and faster with less cueing and if they are already nicely rounded up, it will help them to be more consistent about staying round and stopping on the rear end smoothly.

I agree , word for word.
tinyliny is offline  
post #5 of 9 Old 03-12-2012, 03:26 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Edmonton, AB
Posts: 782
• Horses: 2
I also agree woth smrobs but I just wanted to add one thing.

I back my horse a couple steps after almost every stop. Lots of people forget to make sure the shoulders are up while backing. Backing a horse while the shoulders are down and back hallow like smrobs said will teach your horse nothing.
NicoleS11 is offline  
post #6 of 9 Old 03-12-2012, 03:31 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: left of center
Posts: 7,083
• Horses: 2
I also do, but that comes with reining training.

Signature undergoing edits. Please standby.......
franknbeans is offline  
post #7 of 9 Old 03-12-2012, 03:56 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Northern Utah
Posts: 5,455
• Horses: 1
There are some good tips in "The Hackamore Reinsman" by Ed Connell. It was written in the 30's or 40's so some of the terms aren't what we are used to but it's really good advice and a good way to make a horse.

There's nothing like the Rockies in the springtime... Nothing like the freedom in the air... And there ain't nothing better than draggin calves to the fire and there's nothing like the smell of burning hair. -Brenn Hill
kevinshorses is offline  
post #8 of 9 Old 03-12-2012, 04:20 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: The sandbox
Posts: 5,477
• Horses: 0
Agree with all the above....something to add...stopping and especially backing will tell you were your horse is stuck out or stiff. If your horse pulls on your hands during a stop he is stiffening somewhere else in his body. Same with a back up, however I little more telling especially when he backs crooked.
Posted via Mobile Device
COWCHICK77 is online now  
post #9 of 9 Old 03-12-2012, 07:26 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Australia
Posts: 8,175
• Horses: 3
It depends on what discipline you are doing. You mentioned you had some dressage lessons - in dressage, you should certainly not ask for rein back every time you halt. The horse cannot be thinking backwards in halt, only forwards, otherwise they anticipate the rein back and will step back in the halt - and you will lose big marks.

~Horse & Hound Artistry~.

Website: www.horseandhoundartistry.com
Kayty is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bringing a horse back after a year off, and a injury a few years back? HarleyWood Horse Training 4 04-10-2012 08:43 PM
Stop your horse vs "ask him to stop" tinyliny Horse Riding 38 02-17-2012 03:44 PM
My horse won't stop :( Chestnuts73 Horse Riding 6 10-18-2011 06:17 AM
Horse suddenly refuses to lift back hoof/ back up? Mickey4793 Horse Training 4 06-22-2010 01:08 AM
Can't stop my Horse teddyboy Horse Training 43 08-28-2009 09:26 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome