Authoritative Problem
   

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Authoritative Problem

This is a discussion on Authoritative Problem within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        06-17-2013, 03:49 PM
      #1
    Foal
    Authoritative Problem

    Often times when I am grooming or taking up my horse, he turns his hip into me and gets that 'angry wrinkle' under his eye. I have been thinking it is an impatient habit that he does to tell me he just wants to be done, but obviously it is unacceptable behavior. Since he is tied up when this happens I don't have the rope to re-correct him immediately so I end up resorting to untying him and proceeding with groundwork. After I have changed his attitude, I can usually finish tacking him up.
    I would like some help with completely correcting this problem, its a drag not to be able to simply brush, tack up, and go. Thanks for the help!
         
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        06-17-2013, 04:03 PM
      #2
    Green Broke
    Smack him on the hip and yell "quit"
    Posted via Mobile Device
    FaydesMom and EquineObsessed like this.
         
        06-17-2013, 04:54 PM
      #3
    Super Moderator
    By the time you have untied him and proceeded to do some groundwork he wouldn't have a clue as to what it was all about.
    You do not need to be on their rope to correct. As said, give him a slap or, a good poke with your finger on his shoulder or neck with a word of correction.
    palogal, Cherie and waresbear like this.
         
        06-17-2013, 05:11 PM
      #4
    Trained
    If he can turn his hip into you, then he can turn it away from you. When he turns into you, tell him "NO" and move him back to where he was, or even a bit further away.
    Northern likes this.
         
        06-18-2013, 12:29 AM
      #5
    Super Moderator
    Use two lead-ropes -- one to tie him with and one you hold in your hand. This is how we handle ALL young and un-trained horses during grooming, doctoring, saddleing, etc. Then, any time the horse leans into the handler or takes even one step toward a handler, they can get a quick 'instant' jerk on the lead-rope and a sharp "Ah!". They learn very quickly what is unacceptable behavior. Manners should be one of the first things any horse learns. Untieing and chasing a horse around after they have done something wrong makes no sense to me or to the horse.

    You can smack a horse, but that is not what I have found most effective. I have found the quick instant jerk on the lead-rope and the "Ah!" to be so effective that most horses stand still and respectfully keep their attention on the handler after only a few sessions of being tied and groomed. Many of these horses are barely halter broke and almost unhandled when we first bring them in and start grooming them. We do this to gentle them and manner them before we start doing any other groundwork.
         
        06-18-2013, 12:34 PM
      #6
    Yearling
    Very simple. Carry a whip.
    Any sign of aggression, and that's what turning his butt to you is, pinning ears etc. POP! It may take once or twice, but he will quit.
         
        06-18-2013, 12:53 PM
      #7
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by palogal    
    Very simple. Carry a whip.
    Any sign of aggression, and that's what turning his butt to you is, pinning ears etc. POP! It may take once or twice, but he will quit.
    And don't annoy him with it either, MAKE IT COUNT.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    FaydesMom likes this.
         
        06-18-2013, 02:16 PM
      #8
    Foal
    Is he turning his hip, giving you the eye when you are grooming a particular spot?

    Quite often horses have intestional ulcers, even simple pleasure horses with an easy going lifestyle may have them. There are pressure points on the horse that we touch when we are grooming, when we touch these spots, it causes pain. He may actually just be trying to tell you that he's hurting, and not being troublesome.

    I really suggest you watch this video
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fr05hMmLCY4
    Northern likes this.
         
        06-18-2013, 03:00 PM
      #9
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GentleHandsEquine    
    Is he turning his hip, giving you the eye when you are grooming a particular spot?

    Quite often horses have intestional ulcers, even simple pleasure horses with an easy going lifestyle may have them. There are pressure points on the horse that we touch when we are grooming, when we touch these spots, it causes pain. He may actually just be trying to tell you that he's hurting, and not being troublesome.

    I really suggest you watch this video
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fr05hMmLCY4
    You have GOT to be kidding me. This is the reason horses become spoiled and unmanageable.

    This horse is being snotty. Horses don't turn their butts to people PERIOD. There is no excuse for this behavior. If he has ulcers there are other symptoms - eating rocks, biting while saddling.

    Turning his butt is disrespect.
         
        06-18-2013, 08:39 PM
      #10
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GentleHandsEquine    
    Is he turning his hip, giving you the eye when you are grooming a particular spot?

    Quite often horses have intestional ulcers, even simple pleasure horses with an easy going lifestyle may have them. There are pressure points on the horse that we touch when we are grooming, when we touch these spots, it causes pain. He may actually just be trying to tell you that he's hurting, and not being troublesome.

    I really suggest you watch this video
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fr05hMmLCY4
    Wow. Nope, not happening in my barn. Besides if a horse is in pain, they are not going to turn TOWARD the cause of the pain. The horse will flinch away. A fresh horse, or one not trained might kick out, but that's not acceptable either.

    This activity, posted by the OP, is about getting into her space and is not acceptable.
    palogal and Palomine like this.
         

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