Authoritative Problem - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 16 Old 06-17-2013, 03:49 PM Thread Starter
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Authoritative Problem

Often times when I am grooming or taking up my horse, he turns his hip into me and gets that 'angry wrinkle' under his eye. I have been thinking it is an impatient habit that he does to tell me he just wants to be done, but obviously it is unacceptable behavior. Since he is tied up when this happens I don't have the rope to re-correct him immediately so I end up resorting to untying him and proceeding with groundwork. After I have changed his attitude, I can usually finish tacking him up.
I would like some help with completely correcting this problem, its a drag not to be able to simply brush, tack up, and go. Thanks for the help!
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post #2 of 16 Old 06-17-2013, 04:03 PM
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Smack him on the hip and yell "quit"
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post #3 of 16 Old 06-17-2013, 04:54 PM
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By the time you have untied him and proceeded to do some groundwork he wouldn't have a clue as to what it was all about.
You do not need to be on their rope to correct. As said, give him a slap or, a good poke with your finger on his shoulder or neck with a word of correction.
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post #4 of 16 Old 06-17-2013, 05:11 PM
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If he can turn his hip into you, then he can turn it away from you. When he turns into you, tell him "NO" and move him back to where he was, or even a bit further away.
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post #5 of 16 Old 06-18-2013, 12:29 AM
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Use two lead-ropes -- one to tie him with and one you hold in your hand. This is how we handle ALL young and un-trained horses during grooming, doctoring, saddleing, etc. Then, any time the horse leans into the handler or takes even one step toward a handler, they can get a quick 'instant' jerk on the lead-rope and a sharp "Ah!". They learn very quickly what is unacceptable behavior. Manners should be one of the first things any horse learns. Untieing and chasing a horse around after they have done something wrong makes no sense to me or to the horse.

You can smack a horse, but that is not what I have found most effective. I have found the quick instant jerk on the lead-rope and the "Ah!" to be so effective that most horses stand still and respectfully keep their attention on the handler after only a few sessions of being tied and groomed. Many of these horses are barely halter broke and almost unhandled when we first bring them in and start grooming them. We do this to gentle them and manner them before we start doing any other groundwork.

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post #6 of 16 Old 06-18-2013, 12:34 PM
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Very simple. Carry a whip.
Any sign of aggression, and that's what turning his butt to you is, pinning ears etc. POP! It may take once or twice, but he will quit.
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post #7 of 16 Old 06-18-2013, 12:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by palogal View Post
Very simple. Carry a whip.
Any sign of aggression, and that's what turning his butt to you is, pinning ears etc. POP! It may take once or twice, but he will quit.
And don't annoy him with it either, MAKE IT COUNT.
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post #8 of 16 Old 06-18-2013, 02:16 PM
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Is he turning his hip, giving you the eye when you are grooming a particular spot?

Quite often horses have intestional ulcers, even simple pleasure horses with an easy going lifestyle may have them. There are pressure points on the horse that we touch when we are grooming, when we touch these spots, it causes pain. He may actually just be trying to tell you that he's hurting, and not being troublesome.

I really suggest you watch this video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fr05hMmLCY4
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Gentleness is the true strength of the world, not the threat of the whip. Violence always begets more violence. -Monty Roberts
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post #9 of 16 Old 06-18-2013, 03:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GentleHandsEquine View Post
Is he turning his hip, giving you the eye when you are grooming a particular spot?

Quite often horses have intestional ulcers, even simple pleasure horses with an easy going lifestyle may have them. There are pressure points on the horse that we touch when we are grooming, when we touch these spots, it causes pain. He may actually just be trying to tell you that he's hurting, and not being troublesome.

I really suggest you watch this video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fr05hMmLCY4
You have GOT to be kidding me. This is the reason horses become spoiled and unmanageable.

This horse is being snotty. Horses don't turn their butts to people PERIOD. There is no excuse for this behavior. If he has ulcers there are other symptoms - eating rocks, biting while saddling.

Turning his butt is disrespect.
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post #10 of 16 Old 06-18-2013, 08:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GentleHandsEquine View Post
Is he turning his hip, giving you the eye when you are grooming a particular spot?

Quite often horses have intestional ulcers, even simple pleasure horses with an easy going lifestyle may have them. There are pressure points on the horse that we touch when we are grooming, when we touch these spots, it causes pain. He may actually just be trying to tell you that he's hurting, and not being troublesome.

I really suggest you watch this video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fr05hMmLCY4
Wow. Nope, not happening in my barn. Besides if a horse is in pain, they are not going to turn TOWARD the cause of the pain. The horse will flinch away. A fresh horse, or one not trained might kick out, but that's not acceptable either.

This activity, posted by the OP, is about getting into her space and is not acceptable.
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