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Authoritative Problem

This is a discussion on Authoritative Problem within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category

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        06-18-2013, 08:48 PM
      #11
    Started
    OP can deduce whether the horse's action is connected to her being touched at a certain spot. The vet said that a horse will either get evasive, or aggressive. Aggression is not always "disrespect", but self-protection; a way to stop the action of another which is causing pain.
         
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        06-19-2013, 05:56 AM
      #12
    Yearling
    Making excuses for bad behavior is how people get hurt. Regardless of the reason, turning the butt toward you is not acceptable.
         
        06-19-2013, 08:16 PM
      #13
    Started
    You're saying that the vet in the video with the two horses who reacted both by evading & being aggressive should have reprimanded them for those? It was their only way of communicating, since they can't say, "OUCH! STOP IT!"

    There was no "disrespect", so a horse shouldn't be reprimanded AS IF he was "disrespectful".
         
        06-20-2013, 05:10 PM
      #14
    Yearling
    OP's horse is not moving away from pain or pressure, he's moving toward her without permission. That is blatant disrespect. Excusing his behavior as "oh he's in pain" when he is not is how horses become spoiled and disrespectful.
         
        06-20-2013, 05:13 PM
      #15
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Northern    
    You're saying that the vet in the video with the two horses who reacted both by evading & being aggressive should have reprimanded them for those? It was their only way of communicating, since they can't say, "OUCH! STOP IT!"

    There was no "disrespect", so a horse shouldn't be reprimanded AS IF he was "disrespectful".

    Horse's can communicate pain without being nasty to people. Pinning ears for example means 'I don't like that' and a good owner would observe that something is wrong with a horse that begins to display those behaviors. Disrespect is always disrespect and needs to be corrected. It doesn't need to be a severe correction if there is pain involved but at least a verbal correction so the horse knows that their action is not acceptable.
    NorthernMama and Cherie like this.
         
        06-21-2013, 07:10 PM
      #16
    Started
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by palogal    
    ... If he has ulcers there are other symptoms - eating rocks, biting while saddling, due to pressure on spots that become painful when ulcers are present, and doing evasions and/or aggressive acts, when palpated by a human in the spots the vet shows in the video.
    Fixed.

    I thank Gentlehands for this informative video. Perhaps OP'll palpate her horse & tell us what happened.
         

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