Avoiding the mount and it's my fault...
   

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Avoiding the mount and it's my fault...

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  • My horse moves away when i mount

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    02-27-2012, 04:35 PM
  #1
Foal
Avoiding the mount and it's my fault...

My barn owner/trainer agreed to help me today as I am having difficulty mounting. He either backs up or swing his hind quarters away from me. I thought that he was trying to get out of work and that was the problem. Well, she watched me mount and she says that I'm kneeing him in the flank. She said that he used to stand perfectly still before I got him (she had him for a few months prior to me buying him from her).

I'm so upset that I have caused this problem!! I never even feel my leg touch him. I just don't understand how I am doing this. So now I've got this horse that did great on the mount that now tries anything to avoid me getting on. She said that it will take about 100 mounts that are done correctly for him to get over this.

I've got on other horses with no problem, but for some reason I have a tough time with him. For now, I'm going to using a mounting block all the time with someone holding him, until he realizes that I'm not going to hurt him. Are there any other suggestions?
     
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    02-27-2012, 04:44 PM
  #2
Green Broke
Nonsense. This thing happens a lot and finished horses don't mind. I've been thoroughly enjoying Julie Goodnight's series on backing a young horse. Her advice to the first mounting session is to periodically toe the horse, knee the horse, drag your heel over the back side of the horse, etc. to desensitize the horse to those things that happen during mounting.
IMHO your horse doesn't respect you. PERHAPS you are fearful, perhaps you are not the leader in the relationship and he doesn't believe that he has to be ridden anymore, which is why he's acting up.
You need to learn how to mount correctly bc you could be dragged by the stirrup mounting in this way. I suggest practicing mounting a wooden rail fence. You should bend your knee to your chin on a trajectory that goes over the pommel and at a 45 degree angle to your horse's head, then feet together, then gently swing your right leg over to land gently on the saddle. It works from the other side, and your horse will need to learn to accept that, too.
If you're mounting incorrectly you'll be dragging yourself up the fence. If done correctly, 3 jumps and your feet are easily together. Fences don't move, so they are a good substitute.
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    02-27-2012, 04:55 PM
  #3
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Corporal    
Nonsense. This thing happens a lot and finished horses don't mind. I've been thoroughly enjoying Julie Goodnight's series on backing a young horse. Her advice to the first mounting session is to periodically toe the horse, knee the horse, drag your heel over the back side of the horse, etc. to desensitize the horse to those things that happen during mounting.
IMHO your horse doesn't respect you. PERHAPS you are fearful, perhaps you are not the leader in the relationship and he doesn't believe that he has to be ridden anymore, which is why he's acting up.
You need to learn how to mount correctly bc you could be dragged by the stirrup mounting in this way. I suggest practicing mounting a wooden rail fence. You should bend your knee to your chin on a trajectory that goes over the pommel and at a 45 degree angle to your horse's head, then feet together, then gently swing your right leg over to land gently on the saddle. It works from the other side, and your horse will need to learn to accept that, too.
If you're mounting incorrectly you'll be dragging yourself up the fence. If done correctly, 3 jumps and your feet are easily together. Fences don't move, so they are a good substitute.
That's what I originally thought too. He definitely doesn't seem to respect me as leader as good as I would like. He's great about some things, but there is a dominance struggle going on. He is very dominate with other horses. I am sooooooooo careful with my legs and that is why I don't think I could possibly be hurting him. I'm not a superstar athlete, but I'm in pretty good shape and it's not like I'm struggling to get up there either. I think I could mount in a heart beat if he would just stand still! That's a good idea to practice with a fence though. In the past, I've been told that I mount really well, so that's why it's hard to understand how I just started doing an awful job that "ruined" my horse for mounting. So very frustrating. Thanks for the tips!
     
    02-27-2012, 05:05 PM
  #4
Weanling
I whole heartedly agree with Corporal on this one. A well trained horse shouldn't be bothered by this enough to make it that difficult. Either the horse had very careful mounters or he's figured out how to get out of doing something he doesnt want to. With my mare, my first mounting sessions I had, I sacked her out with those types of things. Dragged my foot across her rump, mounted from both sides multiple times, kneed her a bit flapped the stirrips up and down on her side a bit back and forth and I quit when she was standing still as the reward. I got on a mare I was looking at that had 30 days under saddle, I dragged my toe while mounting and she spooked, that tells me a step was missed. If this guy is shying away from you, he likely has decided he doesn't like it and as figured out that by moving away from you he can win his 'game' of not having to work, or someone missed a step in his training and he has not dealt with anything but a really careful mount.

I would sack him out.

If he backs away from you...back him up a ways and when you decide to stop give him a chance to stand still while you mount. If he backs up again back him some more. If he moves away from you at the rump, push him around in a circle with his movement until you decide to stop -give him a chance to stand still while you mount, if he moves away again, make him work some more.

They will eventually learn that they have to do less work when they stand still.
     
    02-27-2012, 05:21 PM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by kstinson    
I whole heartedly agree with Corporal on this one. A well trained horse shouldn't be bothered by this enough to make it that difficult. Either the horse had very careful mounters or he's figured out how to get out of doing something he doesnt want to. With my mare, my first mounting sessions I had, I sacked her out with those types of things. Dragged my foot across her rump, mounted from both sides multiple times, kneed her a bit flapped the stirrips up and down on her side a bit back and forth and I quit when she was standing still as the reward. I got on a mare I was looking at that had 30 days under saddle, I dragged my toe while mounting and she spooked, that tells me a step was missed. If this guy is shying away from you, he likely has decided he doesn't like it and as figured out that by moving away from you he can win his 'game' of not having to work, or someone missed a step in his training and he has not dealt with anything but a really careful mount.


I would sack him out.

If he backs away from you...back him up a ways and when you decide to stop give him a chance to stand still while you mount. If he backs up again back him some more. If he moves away from you at the rump, push him around in a circle with his movement until you decide to stop -give him a chance to stand still while you mount, if he moves away again, make him work some more.

They will eventually learn that they have to do less work when they stand still.
My barn owner/trainer is of the mind set that 90% of all horse problems are rider error. She is convinced that it is my fault that there are mounting issues. My gut tells me that the only part that is my fault is that I haven't established the leader role firmly enough. Some ground work will definitely help. I don't even think he spooks at all, he just knows that mount = going to work. He's still pretty young and prior to me was probably not ridden in 3years. There seem to be some holes in his training or maybe just too much time has lapsed since. Either way, we have a lot of work ahead of us.
     
    02-27-2012, 05:35 PM
  #6
Weanling
I would agree with her there 9 times out of 10 it is the rider, but that doesnt mean that rider who made the mistake was you. Perhaps the rider who trained the horse and did not sack him out made the mistake here...Or maybe it is you, in which case you work through it and learn a bit more about horses by retraining him to stand still. If you just work him by spinning and backing him, allowing him the chance also to stand still for your mounting, you are establishing the authority and respect from your horse but you're also working with him not against him, it is a lot easier to convince a horse, than it is to force a horse. Either way it shouldn't be a terribly hard fix, just takes patience and you have to stick with it until you are satisfied with the results. The little holes in training most often show up because people didn't want to take the time to worry about them and would rather just ride. I have seen this many times, it isn't the horses fault so just remember that when you are working with him. Firm yet relaxed.

My theory - work on training your horse that day on the very first thing they show you that they need work on. If it is leading, lead them, if it is picking their hooves, pick their hooves, if it is standing still, make them stand. If it is cantering, canter them. To me that is some of the most effective ways to train a well rounded horse.
tbrantley and Newby32 like this.
     
    02-27-2012, 08:00 PM
  #7
Weanling
I have a 16 hand horse that I struggle getting on. I have a hard time streatching my foot high enough to reach the stirrup. I have a hard time swinging my leg over the saddle and saddle bags and it is more like a blop when I sit in the saddle. My poor horse stands there patiently waiting while I pull and tug to try to get on it. This is not a pretty site and I am sure that my horse does not like it but he just braces himself and waits . I am thinking that if my horse can put up with all I am putting him through and still stand there, then your horse should not mind a little touch of your knee as you are swinging on.
It does sound like he may need some more work on his mounting manners. I am sure as you work on retraining him and letting him know that you are the leader, you will see a difference on everything you do with him and his attitude will improve. Wish you the best!
mvinotime likes this.
     
    02-27-2012, 10:41 PM
  #8
Trained
Either back him up for a long ways, or do some sending exercises, or lunge him on the spot...like as SOON as he moves that hind end you move his feet hard and fast. IF he is indeed a well broke horse, he will catch on really quickly to the fact that, "dang, this woman means business, maybe I had best stand still at the mounting block!!!"

I don't put up with nonsense like that, especially out of a horse that I KNOW should know better! Like my mare the other day, started backing up when I went to put on her bell boots...I put her into a back up, and then started sending her back and forth, til she was puffing a bit, brought her back up to where we had originally started, dropped her lead back on the ground, and she stood like she knew she was supposed to in the first place.
     
    02-27-2012, 11:13 PM
  #9
Weanling
You are new to this horse and it is testing you. ;) Your job is to pass the test. As mom2pride suggested move his feet and let him know NOT standing still is more work for him than staying put it will click rather quickly. That is one of the most dangerous things a horse can do to you move out away when your mounting, if they bolt or take off before your situated guess what happens...you can end up hung in a stirrup or sliding off so get it fixed ASAP.
     
    02-27-2012, 11:17 PM
  #10
Foal
What has worked for me (I had a cronic mover) try and mount when he moves while your still on the ground pull his head torwards you and disengage his hindquarters make sure to let him repeatedly cross his back legs and turn on the shouler closer to you.
If he doesnt want to stand quietly make him work. Do this every time he moves while mounting and you will see results with in a few rides :)

It has worked on all the horses I have owned.
     

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