Bad Ground Manners
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Training Horses > Horse Training

Bad Ground Manners

This is a discussion on Bad Ground Manners within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Dealing with a horse with bad ground manners
  • Lesson horse with bad groundmanners

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    06-05-2011, 05:57 PM
  #1
Foal
Bad Ground Manners

The horse than I usually ride (those of you who posted in my other thread will know about her) is very bad when it comes to ground manners. She is nasty to other horses, which wouldn't be so bad if she were good to humans. However, she kicks and bites humans as well as horses.

Usually, I find that being gentle and calm around her will keep her happy, and when she's not kicking or biting she is very sweet. However, she can tend to be moody, and often times just swings around and kicks/bites me for no reason at all. She does this even when I am merely grooming her gently. Yelling 'quit' and tugging the lead rope or crossties works for most horses, but not her. She just waits until my guard is down and then has another go. She even manages to nail me with a firm kick when I'm standing beside her without swinging her body around.

She's especially sensitive around the girth area. Even putting my hand there to feel if she has any dirt there results in an attempted kick or bite. It's even worse when I'm doing up the girth. She also hates it when I put tack on her back... even if its only a saddle pad. She has been checked by a vet and has no injuries or problems.

I ride her often, and so I need to know how to stop this behavior. She does this to everyone. What she needs is a trainer to help stop this unwanted behavior, but since she is a lesson horse that is not up to me to decide. But in the mean time, I need to know how to deal with it.

Thanks!
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    06-05-2011, 07:07 PM
  #2
Trained
Poor horse needs to NOT be a lesson horse and go to someone who will earn and keep her respect...period. She "may" learn how to behave/respect you, but that will not go across the board, so she will still be a danger to others who have no interest in gaining her respect and only want to ride. That's the problem with horses who are in alot of lesson situations...you have riders who aren't experienced in handling a horse, and then you have horses that shouldn't even BE in that situation in the first place...and this is what happens. It's not the horse's fault, is the owner's fault for putting her in that situation. Since you are not the owner of the animal you are kind of "Stuck"...since you aren't in a position to train or send the animal to a trainer.
     
    06-05-2011, 07:26 PM
  #3
Green Broke
Sounds like she is walking all over you and other people.

I know how to fix it, but your not going to listen to it so I'm not going to annoy you with it.
     
    06-05-2011, 10:12 PM
  #4
Weanling
+1 on Mom2Pride. I can easily imagine a horse that bites, kicks, is twitchy, and won't respond appropriately to leg aids (this is the horse that won't keep the canter, no?), and who has a history of other bad manners too. What I can't imagine is any responsible stable owner or trainer putting this horse out as a lesson horse.

I understand you have a special relationship with this animal, but this horse does not sound in the least bit appropriate for use in lessons. She's (this is a mare, IIRC) not going to give appropriate reinforcement to the riders when they do things *correctly* which is going to lead to the riders developing bad habits to get around her quirky stuff.

And from her standpoint, as a twitchy critter, it seems like being a lesson horse is the worst possible career! It sounds like this horse needs to be someone's one-and-only, and at this point, a project too.

She might be *your* project, but she shouldn't be getting farmed out to others for lessons, and given the amount of work it sounds like you're wanting (and needing) to put into her, you should be getting compensation. Some kind of lease, maybe? I don't know, but I do know that the effort you're putting in is likely to get undone as soon as she gets someone else in the saddle for another lesson. :(
     
    06-05-2011, 10:19 PM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray MacDonald    
Sounds like she is walking all over you and other people.

I know how to fix it, but your not going to listen to it so I'm not going to annoy you with it.
Excuse me? What did I do to deserve that kind of a response? I wouldn't ask the question if I didn't want answers. Right now I'm open to trying just about anything unless you tell me to beat her black and blue. If you know how to fix it, I'd be happy to hear it.
     
    06-05-2011, 10:27 PM
  #6
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by serafina    
+1 on Mom2Pride. I can easily imagine a horse that bites, kicks, is twitchy, and won't respond appropriately to leg aids (this is the horse that won't keep the canter, no?), and who has a history of other bad manners too. What I can't imagine is any responsible stable owner or trainer putting this horse out as a lesson horse.

I understand you have a special relationship with this animal, but this horse does not sound in the least bit appropriate for use in lessons. She's (this is a mare, IIRC) not going to give appropriate reinforcement to the riders when they do things *correctly* which is going to lead to the riders developing bad habits to get around her quirky stuff.

And from her standpoint, as a twitchy critter, it seems like being a lesson horse is the worst possible career! It sounds like this horse needs to be someone's one-and-only, and at this point, a project too.

She might be *your* project, but she shouldn't be getting farmed out to others for lessons, and given the amount of work it sounds like you're wanting (and needing) to put into her, you should be getting compensation. Some kind of lease, maybe? I don't know, but I do know that the effort you're putting in is likely to get undone as soon as she gets someone else in the saddle for another lesson. :(
I agree with you completely that she shouldn't be a lesson horse. I feel aweful for her. Though right now I don't have enough money to lease her, I am looking into part boarding her. That basically means that I'll be allowed to come and ride her two or three times a week plus one weekly lesson. I feel like if I give her enough time and love she'll become a great little pony, but at the moment that is very difficult when I can only see her once a week and have a bunch of other people riding her as well. :(
     
    06-05-2011, 11:22 PM
  #7
Trained
She needs to learn how to respect you first...don't coddle this horse; teach her that YOU are her leader, or she will continue to test your authority. A horse that kicks and bites like she sounds like she does, is a horse that is basically telling you "move it, get away from me, don't touch me, etc..."

Start taking her out of the barn to do your grooming, tacking up, etc...maybe a round pen if you have access. Every time she gets snotty on you, make her move her feet; yield her hips, back her, lunge her, do sending exercises, etc... every time she wants you to stop what you are doing, move her feet, and make her work (the harder you can work her, the quicker she will catch on that being 'quiet', and complient, is the best answer.). Keep in mind, she may take longer to grasp the concept, simply because you are not the only one handling her, and she may never be fully trustworthy (again, due to the inconsistancy in handlers). But with some time and consistency on your part, she should start to realize that you aren't going to accept her behavior.
     
    06-06-2011, 07:54 AM
  #8
Yearling
This horse is in a very sad situation. She needs to be taken out of being a school/lesson horse as she has put up with such inconsistent handling her mind is possibly damaged beyond rehabilitation.
     
    06-06-2011, 03:18 PM
  #9
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by mom2pride    
She needs to learn how to respect you first...don't coddle this horse; teach her that YOU are her leader, or she will continue to test your authority. A horse that kicks and bites like she sounds like she does, is a horse that is basically telling you "move it, get away from me, don't touch me, etc..."

Start taking her out of the barn to do your grooming, tacking up, etc...maybe a round pen if you have access. Every time she gets snotty on you, make her move her feet; yield her hips, back her, lunge her, do sending exercises, etc... every time she wants you to stop what you are doing, move her feet, and make her work (the harder you can work her, the quicker she will catch on that being 'quiet', and complient, is the best answer.). Keep in mind, she may take longer to grasp the concept, simply because you are not the only one handling her, and she may never be fully trustworthy (again, due to the inconsistancy in handlers). But with some time and consistency on your part, she should start to realize that you aren't going to accept her behavior.
This is one of the ways I like to fix the problem, the other way I was originally thinking of was to kick her in the butt like another more dominate horse would, or give a good swat with a dressage whip.

Sorry, I didn't mean to sound snarky to you, but I am not a believer that if you have a disrepectful horse you should just give more "love" to it and it will change for you.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Horse With No Manners rissaxbmth Horse Training 25 02-03-2010 04:09 AM
Lack of Manners ScarletRoyal Horse Training 8 10-14-2009 01:39 PM
Manners PLEASE! dreamrideredc Horse Talk 5 10-11-2009 08:25 PM
Bad manners? EquineLoverForever Horse Training 10 04-18-2009 03:36 PM
Manners! Spastic_Dove Horse Training 4 08-06-2008 05:21 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:08 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0