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Bad Habits

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  • How to get rid of bad habbits with stallions?

 
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    03-07-2008, 12:47 PM
  #11
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by My2Geldings
Worth the waiting? It all depends what it is you want to do.
how old is the stallion, Small_Town? It does depend on what you want to do with him and the age. If you plan on doing jumping, and he's young and still growing, you'll have time to correct the problems for you don't want to start jumping a horse too young.

Getting rid of any bad habit isn't just a day thing, it takes time. Some horses learn quicker than others; yet others have gotten so used to the bad habit that it's become second nature to them.
     
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    03-07-2008, 01:41 PM
  #12
Yearling
Stallions are way more mouthy, nippy, mouth curious than geldings. Get him gelded before you make any decisions about selling/trading him for something else. MANY of your problems will disappear in a short time after he is gelded if you are consistent with your expectations.

Younger horses are also more mouthy, so if he is young, you will have to work with him and be very strict about not letting him nip, and he will grow out of it.

You may have to experiment a bit for how to correct his nipping. Depending on the horse, it might work to smack his neck, scold him loudly, back him, trot him in a couple of circles, or tug firmly on the lead while scolding NO every time he nips. Try whichever you think will work best a couple of times, and if you see no difference or even an increase in nipping - TRY SOMETHING ELSE! They like to make a game out of it - so be careful to avoid that.

When my stallion was 2, he made a game out of nipping/mouthing when I used smacking as a correction. I changed methods to more of a firm scolding with addition of work by backing, and he grew out of the problem.

He is still very mouth curious about clothes, tack, and everything, but I just monitor it and only let him do it under acceptable circumstances (to approved objects). Sometimes I give him my crop, and he will stand there holding it in his mouth until he gets bored with it and drops it. The other day, he actually was licking my coat (not sure what that was about, maybe salt on the coat from something, but he had never done that)- I kept a close eye on him, and his eyes were very soft - it was interesting. I used to have a gelding who licked also. :)
     
    03-07-2008, 04:04 PM
  #13
Foal
Excuse me for not agreeing you but I don't think a stallion should be gelded for minor behavioural faults.

Biting, being naughty, jumping and sometimes pulling... these are the way young unbroken colts usually do. It's probably he is just playing. He is not used to dealing with humans, he thinks you are one of his young stallion friends who he grew up with. Did he ever attacked you?

Of course these things could be tiresome. It's not the best way to educate him with smacking, especially because smacking him many times just makes him being nervous and he will hitch his head every time you want to touch his head. Beat him if you MUST, but only if he does some serious hurt against you.

Maybe you should change him for an elder, calmer gelding or mare.
Or if you stick to him, ask the man who breaks him for you to teach him these things and to teach you also how to handle him in everyday grooming.
     
    03-07-2008, 04:15 PM
  #14
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by daroczy
Excuse me for not agreeing you but I don't think a stallion should be gelded for minor behavioural faults.

Biting, being naughty, jumping and sometimes pulling... these are the way young unbroken colts usually do. It's probably he is just playing. He is not used to dealing with humans, he thinks you are one of his young stallion friends who he grew up with. Did he ever attacked you?

Of course these things could be tiresome. It's not the best way to educate him with smacking, especially because smacking him many times just makes him being nervous and he will hitch his head every time you want to touch his head. Beat him if you MUST, but only if he does some serious hurt against you.

Maybe you should change him for an elder, calmer gelding or mare.
Or if you stick to him, ask the man who breaks him for you to teach him these things and to teach you also how to handle him in everyday grooming.
She may have additional reasons for gelding him. Therefore, gelding him as soon as possible will be very helpful, as she can start working with him without all of those hormones.

Also, she may not have the skills or desire to handle a stallion. It is not to be taken lightly. They can be really good, sweet, talented, affectionate boys, but there is a whole different rule book (metaphor) for working with, training, handling, and riding them. :)
     
    03-07-2008, 04:33 PM
  #15
Foal
I agree with some things wrote. If she has additional reasons to geld him, then let it be :) But gelding is not a good treatment for behavioural anomalies.

My friend three years ago gelded his 3 sporthorse stallions because he had an uncompetent stableboy who handled them wrongly and they became unhandlable. One of them is still unhandable as a gelding, he's now 4 years old and no one rides on him. You still cannot go inside his box for feeding him or celaning his box until he is inside because he attacks you. You cannot lift his legs or touch his bottom.

The other one is a greater loss. Now he is five years old and have won all showjumping competitions he participated. He jumps on 150 and wins every time. But still the best riders can ride on him... and he will not have be able to throughpass any of his great genes because of being got gelded.

They live together with my two years old riding pony stallion who runs with me, comes with me without leading him on rope, lays down when asked. You can touch him ANYWHERE, you can touch his eyes too. I usually pull his tail or mane with all my force and he does not kick. At six mounths I bought him and I started to train him. He is now the best handable horse in the stable.
     
    03-07-2008, 06:25 PM
  #16
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by daroczy
I agree with some things wrote. If she has additional reasons to geld him, then let it be :) But gelding is not a good treatment for behavioural anomalies.
.
I firmly believe that anything that is top quality and in a barn with professionals that can market a stallion should be allowed to be kept a stallion; the others should be gelded.
And if a stallion has behavioural problems, he is not stallion quality - period. Only conformationally and behaviourally exemplary stallions should be allowed to be kept as stallions. The others should be gelded, because they can't advance their breed.

....

I'm sorry, Small_Town, I have followed your other thread and I know you have already decided to geld him regardless, which I commend you for - I am extremely happy that you are doing that. Please geld him before you sell, if you're going to sell him.
Back to the topic at hand:
I agree with Delete, if you aren't completely happy with him, then geld, sell and find something that you really like - you deserve a great horse, from the sounds of it!! If you want to be able to do whatever you want with a horse right away, he is not the horse for you - he is going to require a lot of training .. I am not saying this is a bad thing at all! It is extremely rewarding, and well worth it, but only if you want to do it. If not, it might not be a bad idea to sell him.
In the end, it is up to you! Let us know what your plans are!
     
    03-07-2008, 07:49 PM
  #17
Showing
I think everything that was said was well brought up.

Having a stallion is sometimes really nice but I think in the long run they cause a lot more time, money and there is so much more risk. You have to start carrying insurance just to have him as a stud. The facility you are out has to be able to accommodate a stallion along with the staff.

Like every one else has said I would rather hear you geld him but it is always possible to own a stallion just as along as you prepared to.
     
    03-08-2008, 09:46 AM
  #18
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by SonnyWimps
Quote:
Originally Posted by My2Geldings
Worth the waiting? It all depends what it is you want to do.
how old is the stallion, Small_Town? It does depend on what you want to do with him and the age. If you plan on doing jumping, and he's young and still growing, you'll have time to correct the problems for you don't want to start jumping a horse too young.

Getting rid of any bad habit isn't just a day thing, it takes time. Some horses learn quicker than others; yet others have gotten so used to the bad habit that it's become second nature to them.
He is 2 yrs.
All I really want to do is just pleasure ride with him
And maybe learn to barrel race later on.
     
    03-08-2008, 10:36 AM
  #19
Green Broke
Then geld geld geld geld. If your not breeding. Then save yourself the hassle.
     
    03-08-2008, 10:40 AM
  #20
Showing
If all you are doing is trails there is no reason to keep this horse as a stallion. Don't learn this the hard way.
     

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