Barn/Buddy sour? ..what to do..
 
 

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Barn/Buddy sour? ..what to do..

This is a discussion on Barn/Buddy sour? ..what to do.. within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • What does it mean if a horse is buddy sour or barn sour?

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  • 2 Post By lilruffian
  • 2 Post By DanielDauphin
  • 1 Post By CowboyBob
  • 1 Post By DanielDauphin
  • 1 Post By oldoakfarm

 
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    03-13-2014, 02:33 PM
  #1
Foal
Barn/Buddy sour? ..what to do..

Due to time constraints, I am just now getting to train my mare. She is doing great under saddle with all the basics - stop/go, flexing, and moving off leg pressure.

My problem: when I take her away from the other horses to train, she freaks out a little. Usually her energy level seems to double and she becomes less responsive to my "slow down" cues and instead is focused on returning to her friends. She is responsive when I ask her to move out, but when asked to stop, she'll chill for a second before moving out without my command.

She has never gotten out of control, but she is obviously very worried about being separated. I feel this reaction might be from her lack of experience riding without the other horses.

Any ideas on how I can alleviate this problem and bring her focus back to me?
     
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    03-13-2014, 05:34 PM
  #2
Green Broke
If you do not have time to work with her and teach her confidence on her own, then the only thing I can suggest is to seperate her from other horses.
Horses that are buddy sour aren't actually yearning for their pasture mates, they are yearning for the safety and security of the herd as well as leadership.
If the horse gets nervous when you take it out on it's own, that is a clear sign that she does not see you as her leader, therefor she feels alone and vulnerable.
Try leadership exercises and work from the ground to teach her to pay attention to you and trust you. Lunging, getting her to go over obstacles, etc. Even take her for walks and if she becomes upset, bring her back and work her harder where she is comfortable, then take her out again to relax.
You could also teach her to ground drive. This helps with getting horses not only to respond to the bit but to go ahead on their own when they would normally follow you being led.
Blinkers may or may not be needed, depending on the horse.
But mostly, it comes down to time. If you don't have it, it is a hard problem to get over. Some horses just need more rides (even small ones and lots of practice leaving the yard and coming back until they get used to it and are no longer upset)
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    03-13-2014, 09:46 PM
  #3
Weanling
IMO this is pretty much always a leadership issue. If she really saw you as her leader, then riding away from the barn would be no issue, because her herd was still right there with her.
Getting and then maintaining her attention is the key here. Whenever, and I don't just mean when you leave the barn, whenever you feel her attention leave you, do as much as you have to, but as little as you need to to get her attention back, RIGHT NOW. If you are diligent about this, it will become easier and easier to get her attention and you'll be able to maintain it longer and longer. She needs to draw her confidence from her relationship with you, not from her buddies.
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    03-13-2014, 09:55 PM
  #4
Foal
Thanks for the input you guys! I'm sure you are right and I appreciate the thoughts. When I have taken her trail riding (no other horses), she does just fine. I only encountered this problem when I took her to a pasture to work in one specific area. I have done plenty of groundwork with her though not as much obstacle training so I will try to implement that as well as the other ideas.
     
    03-13-2014, 10:14 PM
  #5
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanielDauphin    
IMO this is pretty much always a leadership issue. If she really saw you as her leader, then riding away from the barn would be no issue, because her herd was still right there with her.
Getting and then maintaining her attention is the key here. Whenever, and I don't just mean when you leave the barn, whenever you feel her attention leave you, do as much as you have to, but as little as you need to to get her attention back, RIGHT NOW. If you are diligent about this, it will become easier and easier to get her attention and you'll be able to maintain it longer and longer. She needs to draw her confidence from her relationship with you, not from her buddies.
I didn't feel the need to rewrite my opinion so I just copied it. There really is nothing I would add this is great advice.
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    03-13-2014, 10:17 PM
  #6
Weanling
Gracias Cowboy Bob
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    03-29-2014, 11:43 PM
  #7
Foal
Just wanted to make an update and say I implemented your suggestions and we were able to conquer my horse's issues! :)
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