Barn sour
 
 

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Barn sour

This is a discussion on Barn sour within the Horse Training forums, part of the Training Horses category
  • Spooky barn sour horses
  • Spooky barn sour horse

 
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    06-20-2008, 09:24 AM
  #1
Foal
Barn sour

Aliha is extemely barn sour for a couple of reasons, 1. She is in her safety zone. She is very nervous when trying new things and very spooky. 2. Her only job right now is to make us happy. The real work hasn't started yet. I can get her to go forever away from the barn, but as soon as we turn around to go home, head start flying, crow hopping, side stepping, the whole 9 yards. I have tried having her stand still facing home, circles, working her butt on at home after a trail ride. Nothing seems to help. This is the only reason I won't let the kids take her out. I am afraid she would return without the kid!! Not good. Any suggestions?
     
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    06-20-2008, 12:27 PM
  #2
Trained
Wow... I'm not sure. YOu have already tried what I would have suggested...The hard work when she gets home, making her stand facing home etc. How long have you been doing this? Maybe you just need more time. Maybe you could try tieing her up when you get home...then she doesn't get to "be free" when she gets home.
     
    06-20-2008, 01:27 PM
  #3
Yearling
Working with a barn sour horse

I would say that you need to work her differently when you head for home...example, weaving through trees, going up hills ect. Get her mind off of it. Make her work. Is it because she is spooky? Is she ok with other horses, just like one other horses out on the trail with her? How old is she? I think that if you got her mind off the crow hopping, head throwing and stuff, then she might forget all about if if you work with her consistantly. Or else, get off of her right there and work with her on the ground as long as she isnt going to leap on you or something dangerous like that. My friends and I have done that: just dismount the horse and take a eight to twelve foot lead rope and work her in both directions, and getting her mind on you, not on her friends and the destination of home. Just some ideas.... :)
     
    06-20-2008, 02:23 PM
  #4
Yearling
Try working her really hard when you get back to the barn for about a week straight, then see if she enjoys 'racing' home only to work her butt off! It won't happen immediately, as she has to realize and expect to be worked when she comes home.
     
    06-20-2008, 03:08 PM
  #5
Showing
Besides all the above, and what has worked for me, is after you've worked her when you get home, cool her off and tie her up while she is still saddled (no bridle of course) for a few hours. Then when you untie her be sure she gets no feed for a while.

BTW, how old is she and how much training has she had? How much feed and hay does she get and what type? A lot of behavior problems like you have can be attributed to diet besides training.
     
    06-20-2008, 03:12 PM
  #6
Weanling
In additon to the other good ideas menitoned.

Try riding her away from the barn, and dismounting, dropping the bit (pack a halter) and let her graze for a few minutes. Lead her home, get back on and ride out again. Do it a bunch. It makes the area away from the barn a lot nicer. End with leaving the barn, dismounting, loosen the cinch and leading back and putting her up.

Also, riding away for a short distance, then back, leave a little farther, back, etc. and always dismount in a different areas AWAY FROM THE BARN. Don't feed her when you get back. Tie her up for a while, still saddled. Then come back and untack, water, etc and turn out. Or go for another ride. I think I'm repeating what everyone else mentioned but you get the idea.

Just keep at it, patience and persistence is what will work. It's not an instant miracle, you're trying to change a habit and will always be working to keep it "fixed". But she will get better in time.
     
    06-20-2008, 10:01 PM
  #7
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by iridehorses
Besides all the above, and what has worked for me, is after you've worked her when you get home, cool her off and tie her up while she is still saddled (no bridle of course) for a few hours. Then when you untie her be sure she gets no feed for a while.

BTW, how old is she and how much training has she had? How much feed and hay does she get and what type? A lot of behavior problems like you have can be attributed to diet besides training.
She is around 6. She has not had any professional training as I was told when I bought her. She is very spooky. We feed alfalfa hay and pellets.
     
    06-20-2008, 10:29 PM
  #8
Showing
Lets Ride, First I would cut out the Alfalfa hay. Race horses, high performance horses, speed horses, horses that are ridden hard every day, etc. are the only ones that need Alfalfa. That type of hay is a very high energy feed and can easily add to behavior problems.

How much feed are you giving her, what brand, and what % protein? Do you stall her or is she turned out?

After we have the answers to that then we look at her training (or retraining). It's important to know how much experience the rider has who is trying to correct her behavior has.
     
    06-21-2008, 03:17 PM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by iridehorses
Lets Ride, First I would cut out the Alfalfa hay. Race horses, high performance horses, speed horses, horses that are ridden hard every day, etc. are the only ones that need Alfalfa. That type of hay is a very high energy feed and can easily add to behavior problems.

How much feed are you giving her, what brand, and what % protein? Do you stall her or is she turned out?

After we have the answers to that then we look at her training (or retraining). It's important to know how much experience the rider has who is trying to correct her behavior has.
Because she was very underweight and wasn't getting good care, the vet has her on it until she gets back to ideal weight. She is worked everyday, either round pen or riding. I have had horses all my life and competed in local small town rodoes. I just don't have the training experience, my grandfather did that for us. She is still about 50-100 pounds lighter than she should be. After the weight has come back, we will go to bermuda or something like that. She is in a stall, but like I said gets lunging, round pen or riding everyday.
     

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